Bertrand Russell Quotes About Once

Browse 16 famous quotes of Bertrand Russell about Once.

"During the war, the holders of power in all countries found it necessary to bribe the populations into cooperation by unusual concessions. Wage-earners were allowed a living wage, Hindus were told they were men and brothers, women were given the vote, and young people were allowed to enjoy those innocent pleasures of which the old, in the name of morality, always wish to rob them. The war being won, the victors set to work to deprive their tools of advantages temporarily conceded." ~ Bertrand Russell
"Religious toleration, to a certain extent, has been won, because people have ceased to consider religion so important as it was once thought to be. But in politics and economics, which have taken the place formerly occupied by religion, there is a growing tendency to persecution, which is not by any means confined to one party." ~ Bertrand Russell
"El impulso natural de la persona vigorosa y decente es tratar de hacer el bien, pero si se ve privada de todo poder político y de toda oportunidad de influir en los acontecimientos, se verá desviada de su curso natural, y decidirá que lo importante es ser bueno. Eso es lo que les ocurrió a los primeros cristianos; ha conducido a un concepto de santidad personal como algo completamente independiente de la acción benéfica, ya que la santidad tenía que ser algo que podía ser logrado por personas impotentes en la acción. Por lo tanto, la virtud social llegó a estar excluida de la ética cristiana. Hasta hoy los cristianos convencionales piensan que un adúltero es peor que un político que acepta sobornos, aunque este último probablemente hace un mal mil veces mayor." ~ Bertrand Russell
"In science, an observer states his results along with the "probable error"; but who ever heard of a theologian or a politician stating the probable error in his dogmas, or even admitting that any error is conceivable? That is because in science, where we approach nearest to real knowledge, a man can safely rely on the strength of his case, whereas, where nothing is known, blatant assertion and hypnotism are the usual ways of causing others to share our beliefs. If the fundamentalist thought they had a good case against evolution, they would not make the teaching of it illegal." ~ Bertrand Russell
"Secondo me la religione si basa, essenzialmente, sulla paura. In parte è il terroredell'ignoto, in parte, come ho già detto, il bisogno istintivo di immaginare qualcunoche ci aiuti e ci protegga nei pericoli: suppergiù una specie di fratello maggiore. Inprincipio, dunque, fu la paura: paura dell'occulto, paura dell'insuccesso, paura dellamorte. La paura porta alla crudeltà, ed è per questo che crudeltà e religione stannobene insieme. Oggi, tanti fenomeni non sono più misteriosi grazie alla scienza, che siè opposta alla religione cristiana, alle Chiese, e a tutti i princìpi anacronistici. Lascienza può aiutare l'umanità a superare questa vile paura, nella quale ha vissuto pertante generazioni. Con l'aiuto della scienza e del nostro cuore, impareremo a noncercare aiuti immaginari, a non inventare alleati in Cielo, ma piuttosto a valerci dellenostre forze per rendere questo mondo più piacevole e diverso da quello che èdivenuto, in questi secoli, sotto l'influsso delle Chiese." ~ Bertrand Russell
"The antidote, in so far as it is a matter of individual psychology, is to be found in history, biology, astronomy, and all those studies which, without destroying self-respect, enable the individual to see himself in his proper perspective. What is needed is not this or that specific piece of information, but such knowledge as inspires a conception of the ends of human life as a whole: art and history, acquaintance with the lives of heroic individuals, and some understanding of the strangely accidental and ephemeral position of man in the cosmos - all this touched with an emotion of pride in what is distinctively human, the power to see and to know, to feel magnanimously and to think with understanding. It is from large perceptions combined with impersonal emotion that wisdom most readily springs." ~ Bertrand Russell
"Intellectually, what is stimulating to a young man is a problem of obvious practical importance. A young man learning economics, for example, ought to hear lectures from individualists and socialists, protectionists and free-traders, inflationists and believers in the gold standard. He ought to be encouraged to read the best books of the various schools, as recommended by those who believe in them. This would teach him to weigh arguments and evidence, to know that no pinion is certainly right, and to judge men by their quality rather than by their consonance with preconceptions." ~ Bertrand Russell
"If we were all given by magic the power to read each other's thoughts, I suppose the first effect would be almost all friendships would be dissolved; the second effect, however, might be excellent, for a world without any friends would be felt to be intolerable, and we should learn to like each other without needing a veil of illusion to conceal from ourselves that we did not think each other absolutely perfect." ~ Bertrand Russell
"As against solipsism it is to be said, in the first place, that it is psychologically impossible to believe, and is rejected in fact even by those who mean to accept it. I once received a letter from an eminent logician, Mrs. Christine Ladd-Franklin, saying that she was a solipsist, and was surprised that there were no others. Coming from a logician and a solipsist, her surprise surprised me." ~ Bertrand Russell
"Noone has yet succeeded in inventing a philosophy at once credible and self-consistent. Locke aimed at credibility, and achieved it at the expense of consistency. Most of the great philosophers have done the opposite. A philosophy which is not self-consistent cannot be wholly true, but a philosophy which is self-consistent can very well be wholly false. The most fruitful philosophies have contained glaring inconsistencies, but for that very reason have been partially true. There is no reason to suppose that a self-consistent system contains more truth than one which, like Locke's, is more or less wrong." ~ Bertrand Russell
"Not all superstitions are dark and cruel. I once received a communication from the god Osiris. He was living at that time in a suburb of Boston." ~ Bertrand Russell
"Philosophy which does not seek to impose upon the world its own conceptions of good and evil is not only more likely to achieve truth, but is also the outcome of a higher ethical standpoint than one which, like evolutionism and most traditional systems, is perpetually appraising the universe and seeking to find in it an embodiment of present ideals." ~ Bertrand Russell
"There was once upon a time a census officer who had to record the names of all householders in a certain Welsh village. The first that he questioned was called William Williams; so were the second, third, fourth.... At last he said to himself: ‘This is tedious; evidently they are all called William Williams. I shall put them down so and take a holiday'. But he was wrong; there was just one whose name was John Jones. This shows that we may go astray if we trust too implicitly to induction by simple enumeration." ~ Bertrand Russell
"Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric." ~ Bertrand Russell
"Is a man what he seems to the astronomer, a tiny lump of impure carbon and water crawling impotently on a small and unimportant planet? Or is he what he appears to Hamlet? Is he perhaps both as once?" ~ Bertrand Russell
"Two things are to be remembered: that a man whose opinions and theories are worth studying may be presumed to have had some intelligence, but that no man is likely to have arrived at complete and final truth on any subject whatever. When an intelligent man expresses a view which seems to us obviously absurd, we should not attempt to prove that it is somehow true, but we should try to understand how it ever came toseemtrue. Thisexercise of historical and psychological imagination at once enlarges the scope of our thinking, and helps us to realize how foolish many of our own cherished prejudices will seem to an age which has a different temper of mind." ~ Bertrand Russell
Quotes About once

Today's Quote

There was a darkness, a melancholy, that people had trouble accepting. Maybe now, it would work better."
Author: Alain Resnais

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