F. Scott Fitzgerald Quotes About Mark

Browse 12 famous quotes of F. Scott Fitzgerald about Mark.

"Very few of the people who accentuate the futility of life remark the futility of themselves. Perhaps they think that in proclaiming the evil of living they somehow salvage their own worth from the ruin - but they don't, even you and I..." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"I suppose there has been nothing like the airports since the age of the stage-stops - nothing quite as lonely, as sombre-silent. The red-brick depots were built right into the towns they marked - people didn't get off at those isolated stations unless they lived there. But airports lead you way back in history like oases, like the stops on the great trade routes. The sight of air travellers strolling in ones and twos into midnight airports will draw a small crowd any night up or two. The young people look at the planes, the older ones look at the passengers with a watchful incredulity." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"Happiness, remarked Maury Noble one day, is only the first hour after the alleviation of some especially intense misery." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"There!" she said, as she spread the tablecloth and put the sandwiches in a neat pile upon it. "Don't they look tempting? I always think that food tastes better outdoors."With that remark," remarked Kismine, "Jasmine enters the Middle class." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"But to be included in Dick Diver's world for a while was a remarkable experience: people believed he made special reservations about them, recognizing the proud uniqueness of their destinies, buried under the compromises of how many years. He won everyone quickly with an exquisite consideration and a politeness that moved so fast and intuitively that it could be examined only in its effect. Then, without caution, lest the first bloom of the relation wither, he opened the gate to his amusing world. So long as they subscribed to it completely, their happiness was his preoccupation, but at the first flicker of doubt as to its all- inclusiveness he evaporated before their eyes, leaving little communicable memory of what he had said or done." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"Amory wondered how people could fail to notice that he was a boy marked for glory, and when faces of the throng turned toward him and ambiguous eyes stared into his, he assumed the most romantic of expressions and walked on the air cushions that lie on the asphalts of fourteen..." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"But I hate to get anywhere by working for it. I'll show the marks, don't you know." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"She was about twenty-four, Rosemary guessed - her face could have been described in terms of conventional prettiness, but the effect was that it had been made first on the heroic scale with strong structure and marking, as if the features and vividness of brow and coloring, everything we associate with temperament and character had been molded with a Rodinesque intention, and then chiseled away in the direction of prettiness to a point where a single slip would have irreparably diminished its force and quality. With the mouth the sculptor had taken desperate chances - it was the cupid's bow of a magazine cover, yet it shared the distinction of the rest." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"She's got an indiscreet voice," I remarked. "It's full of-"I hesitated."Her voice is full of money," he said suddenly.That was it. I'd never understood before. It was full of money-that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals' song of it." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"Doctor Dougall was wrong. It was tempermentally impossible for Amory to get the best marks in school." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"She had achieved the elusiveness that gives hidden significance to the least significant remarks."Is it like you felt toward me in Paris?""I feel comfortable and happy when I'm with you. In Paris it was different. But you never know how you once felt. Do you?" ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
"One writes of scars healed, a loose parallel to the pathology of the skin, but there is no such thing in the life of the individual. There are open wounds, shrunk sometimes to the size of a pin-prick but wounds still. The marks of suffering are more comparable to the loss of a finger, or of the sight of an eye." ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
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Anything that raises any internal honesty about gay life is inherently suspect."
Author: Andrew Sullivan

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