Ian McDonald Quotes About King

Browse 3 famous quotes of Ian McDonald about King.

"A joyful task,' he says and she realizes that he welcomes the idea of years of searching, tile by tile, inscription by inscription, cornice by cornice and niche by niche, that the painstaking search of Sinan's greatest achievement, decades long, is the holy task; that the secret letter is cut in every stone and tile. By the time you find it, you have realized the supreme unimportance of finding it. A Sufi lesson." ~ Ian McDonald
"Well, the human genome has massive redundancy - that means that two per cent of the DNA does all the work of instructing the ribosomes that build the proteins that make up the cells of your body. Ninety-eight per cent of your DNA just sits there doing nothing. Taking up space in the gene." ~ Ian McDonald
"The army doctor who had patched up his hands and examined him after the rescue at Kayisdagi told him a story about the Mevlana, the great saint whose order built this tekke. The Mevlana had a friend, Sams of Tabriz, a spiritual friend, the other half of his soul, one spirit in two bodies. Together they explored the depth of God in ceaseless conversation. The dervishes grew jealous of the one-in-twoness and quietly killed Sams of Tabriz. When the Mevlana was unable to find his friend, the only possible conclusion was that they had merged and Sams was now part of him.Why should I seek?I am the same as he.His essence speaks through me.I have been looking for myself.Necdet knows how long Hizir will be with him." ~ Ian McDonald
Quotes About king

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I have met . . . every week a clever undergraduate, every quarter a dull American don, discovers for the first time what some Shakespeare play really meant. . . . The revolution in thought and sentiment which has occurred in my own lifetime is so great that I belong, mentally, to Shakespeare's world far more than to that of these recent interpreters. I see--I feel it in my bones--I know beyond argument--that most of their interpretations are merely impossible; they involve a way of looking at things which was not known in 1914, much less in the Jacobean period. This daily confirms my suspicion of the same approach to Plato or the New Testament. The idea that any man or writer should be opaque to those who lived in the same culture, spoke the same language, shared the same habitual imagery and unconscious assumptions, and yet transparent to those who have none of these advantages, is in my opinion preposterous."
Author: C.S. Lewis

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