Leo Tolstoy Quotes About Use

Browse 91 famous quotes of Leo Tolstoy about Use.

"I assure you that I sleep anywhere, and always like a dormouse." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"All, everything that I understand, I understand only because I love." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"She felt for him with her whole heart, the more because she was pitying him for suffering from the pain she had caused." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Lorsque cinq semaines plus tard ces hommes quittèrent Moscou, ils ne formaient plus une armée; c'était une foule de maraudeurs, chacun portait sur lui ou transportait en voiture quantité d'objets qui lui sembaient précieux ou nécessaires. Leur but à tous en quittant Moscou n'était pas de conquérir, comme autrefois, mais de garder ce qu'ils avaient pris. Comme un singe qui, ayant introduit sa main dans l'étroit col d'une cruche et saisi une poignée de noix, se refuse à ouvrir son poing pour ne pas lâcher ce qu'il a saisi, et par là périt, ainsi les Français devaient périr parce qu'ils traînaient avec eux leur butin, et qu'abandonner ce butin leur était aussi impossible qu'au singe de lâcher la poignée de noix. (Guerre et Paix, livre troisième, 3ième partie, ch. XXVI)" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Wrong does not cease to be wrong because the majority share in it." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Answer me two more questions,' said the King. ‘The first is, Why did the earth bear such grain then and has ceased to do so now? And the second is, Why your grandson walks with two crutches, your son with one, and you yourself with none? Your eyes are bright, your teeth sound, and your speech clear and pleasant to the ear. How have these things come about?'And the old man answered:‘These things are so, because men have ceased to live by their own labour, and have taken to depending on the labour of others. In the old time, men lived according to God's law. They had what was their own, and coveted not what others had produced." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Formerly, when I was told to consider him wise, I kept trying to, and thought I was stupid myself because I was unable to perceive his wisdom; but as soon as I said to myself, he's stupid (only in a whisper of course), it all became quite clear!  Don't you think so?' 'How malicious you are to-day!''Not at all.  I have no choice.  One of us is stupid, and you know it's impossible to say so of oneself." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"I simply want to live; to cause no evil to anyone but myself." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"The more mental effort he made the clearer he saw that it was undoubtedly so: that he had really forgotten and overlooked one little circumstance in life - that Death would come and end everything, so that it was useless to begin anything, and that there was no help for it, Yes it was terrible but true" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"He meditated on the use to which he should put all the energy of youth which comes to a man only once in life. Should he devote this power, which is not the strength of intellect or heart or education, but an urge which once spent can never return, the power given to a man once only to make himself, or even – so it seems to him at the time – the universe into anything he wishes: should he devote it to art, to science, to love, or to practical activities? True, there are people who never have this urge: at the outset of life they place their necks under the first yoke that offers itself, and soberly toil away in it to the end of their days." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Let them judge me as they like, I could deceive them, but myself I cannot deceive...and strange to say, in this acknowledgement of his baseness there was something painful yet joyful and quieting. More than once in Nekhlyudov's life there had been what he called, 'a cleansing of the soul.' A state of mind in which, after a long period of sluggish inner life...he began to clear out all the rubbish that had accumulated in his soul and caused the cessation of true life. After such an awakening, Nekhlyudov always made some rules for himself...wrote in his diary, began afresh..." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Remember then: there is only one time that is important-- Now! It is the most important time because it is the only time when we have any power. The most necessary man is he with whom you are, for no man knows whether he will ever have dealings with any one else: and the most important affair is, to do him good, because for that purpose alone was man sent into this life!" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"at one time, a freethinker was a man who had been brought up in the conceptions of religion, law and morality, who reached freethought only after conflict and difficulty. But now a new type of born freethinkers has appeared, who grow up without so much as hearing that there used to be laws of morality, or religion, that authorities existed... In the old days, you see, if a man - a Frenchman, for instance- wished to get an education, he would have set to work to study the classics, the theologians, the tragedians, historians and philosophers- and you can realize all the intellectual labour involved. But nowadays he goes straight for the literature of negation, rapidly assimilates the essence of the science of negation, and thinks he's finished." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people to whom it is easy to do good, and who are not accustomed to have it done to them; then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbor — such is my idea of happiness." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"The Bible legend tells us that the absence of toil - idleness - was a condition of the first man's state of bliss before the Fall. This love of idleness has remained the same in the fallen man, but the curse still lies heavy on the human race....because our moral nature is such that we are unable to be idle and at peace. p 590" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Napoleon, the man of genius, did this! But to say that he destroyed his army because he wished to, or because he was very stupid, would be as unjust as to say that he had brought his troops to Moscow because he wished to and because he was very clever and a genius" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Kitty got up to fetch a table, and, as she passed, her eyes met Levin's. She felt for him with her whole heart, the more because she was pitying him for a suffering of which she was herself the cause. "If you can forgive me, forgive me," said her eyes, "I am so happy.""I hate them all, and you, and myself," his eyes responded, and he took up his hat. But he was not destined to escape. Just as they were arranging themselves round the table, and Levin was on the point of retiring, the old Prince came in, and, after greeting the ladies, addressed Levin." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Oare nu e limpede, pentru toti in afara de mine, ca ma sfarsesc ? Si nu e vorba decat de saptamani, de zile ? poate chiar acum mor. A fost lumina si-acum e intuneric. Am fost aici si-acum plec acolo! Unde ?" Il trecura fiori, respiratia i se opri. Nu auzea decat bataile inimii. "N-am sa mai exist ? si-atunci ce-o sa fie? N-o sa fie nimic. Unde am sa fiu cand n-am sa mai exist? Cum? Chiar moartea? Nu, nu vreau!" Se ridica din pat, vru sa aprinda lumanarea, bajbai cu mainile tremuratoare, scapa lumanarea si sfesnicul pe jos si cazu din nou in pat, pe perna. "De ce ? Totuna e, isi spuse, privind cu ochii deschisi in intuneric. Moartea. Da, moartea. Si nimeni din ei nu stie si nici nu vrea sa stie, si nu le e mila. Ei canta! (auzea ca din departare, de dupa usa, glasuri si refrene.) Lor le e totuna, dar si ei o sa moara. Natangii! Eu mai devreme, ei mai tarziu; dar si ei o sa pateasca la fel. Acum se veselesc. Dobitocii!" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Rostov was not listening to the soldier. He looked at the snowflakes dancing above the fire and remembered the Russian winter with a warm, bright house, a fluffy fur coat, swift sleighs, a healthy body, and all the love and care of a family. "And why did I come here?" he wondered." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Love is life. All, everything that I understand, I understand only because I love. Everything is, everything exists, only because I love. Everything is united by it alone. Love is God, and to die means that I, a particle of love, shall return to the general and eternal source." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"[...] but just as formerly these pursuits and ideas had seemed petty and insignificant in comparison with the darkness that overshadowed all existence, so now they seemed as petty and insignificant in comparison with the brilliant sunshine in which the future was bathed. He went on with his work but now he felt that the centre of gravity of his attention had shifted, making him look at his work quite differently and with greater clarity. Formerly this work had been an escape from life: he used to feel that without it life would be too gloomy. Now he needed it so that life might not be too uniformly bright." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"When an apple has ripened and falls, why does it fall? Because of its attraction to the earth, because its stalk withers, because it is dried by the sun, because it grows heavier, because the wind shakes it, or because the boy standing below wants to eat it?" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"And so liberalism had become a habit of Stepan Arkadyevitch's, and he liked his newspaper, as he did his cigar after dinner, for the slight fog it diffused in his brain." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"If there was a reason why he preferred the liberal tendency to the conservative one (also held to by many of his circle), it was not because he found the liberal tendency more sensible, but it more closely suited his manner of life." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Because of the self-confidence with which he had spoken, no one could tell whether what he said was very clever or very stupid." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Attack me, I do this myself, but attack me rather than the path I follow and which I point out to anyone who asks me where I think it lies. If I know the way home and am walking along it drunkenly, is it any less the right way because I am staggering from side to side!" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"[Pierre] involuntarily started comparing these two men, so different and at the same time so similar, because of the love he had for both of them, and because both had lived and both had died." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"wisdom needs no violence...As it is we have played at war – that's what's vile! We play at magnanimity and all that stuff. Such magnanimity and sensibility are like the magnanimity and sensibility of a lady who faints when she sees a calf being killed: she is so kindhearted that she can't look at blood, but enjoys eating the calf served up with sauce…If there was none of this magnanimity in war, we should go to war only when it was worth while going to certain death, as it is now. Then there would not be war because Paul Ivanovich had offended Michael Ivanovich." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Was it through reason that I arrived at the necessity of loving my neighbor and not throttling him?...Not reason. Reason discovered the struggle for existence and the law which demands that everyone who hinders the satisfaction of my desires should be throttled. That is the conclusion of reason. Reason could not discover love for the other, because it's unreasonable." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Children's and Household Tales (German: Kinder- und Hausmärchen) is a collection of German origin fairy tales first published in 1812 by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, the Brothers Grimm. The collection is commonly known today as Grimms' Fairy Tales (German: Grimms Märchen)." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"How can he talk like that?" thought Pierre. He considered his friend a model of perfection because Prince Andrew possessed in the highest degree just the very qualities Pierre lacked, and which might be best described as strength of will." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"This was his acknowledgment of the impossibility of changing a man's convictions by words, and his recognition of the possibility of everyone thinking, feeling, and seeing things each from his own point of view. This legitimate peculiarity of each individual which used to excite and irritate Pierre now became a basis of the sympathy he felt for, and the interest he took in, other people. The difference, and sometimes complete contradiction, between men's opinions and their lives, and between one man and another, pleased him and drew from him an amused and gentle smile." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"«But you are talking of physical love. Do you not admit a love based upon a conformity of ideals, on a spiritual affinity?»«Why not? But in that case it is not necessary to procreate together (excuse my brutality).»" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"When the examination was over, the doctor looked at his watch, and then Praskovya Fyodorovna informed Ivan Ilyich that it must of course be as he liked, but she had sent today for a celebrated doctor, and that he would examine him, and have a consultation with Mihail Danilovich (that was the name of his regular doctor). 'Don't oppose it now, please. This I'm doing entirely for my own sake,' she said ironically, meaning it to be understood that she was doing it all for his sake, and was only saying this to give him no right to refuse her request. He lay silent, knitting his brows. He felt that he was hemmed in by such a tangle of falsity that it was hard to disentangle anything from it. Everything she did for him was entirely for her own sake, and she told him she was doing for her own sake what she actually was doing for her own sake as something so incredible that he would take it as meaning the opposite." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Therefore, all these causes-billions of causes-coincided so as to bring about what happened. And consequently none of them was the exclusive cause of the event, but the event had to take place simply because it had to take place." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Yet time and again, from different approaches, I kept coming to the same conclusion, that I could not have come into the world without any cause, reason, or meaning; that I could not be the fledgeling fallen from the nest that I felt myself to be. If I lie on my back crying in the tall grass, like a fledgeling, it is because I know that my mother brought me into the world, kept me warm, fed me and loved me. But where is she, that mother? If I am abandoned, then who has abandoned me? I cannot hide myself from the fact that someone who loved me gave birth to me. Who is this someone? Again, God." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"I saw that all who do not profess an identical faith with themselves are considered by the Orthodox to be heretics, just as the Catholics and others consider the Orthodox to be heretics. And i saw that the Orthodox (though they try to hide this) regard with hostility all who do not express their faith by the same external symbols and words as themselves; and this is naturally so; first, because the assertion that you are in falsehood and I am in truth, is the most cruel thing one man can say to another; and secondly, because a man loving his children and brothers cannot help being hostile to those who wish to pervert his children and brothers to a false belief. And that hostility is increased in proportion to one's greater knowledge of theology. And to me who considered that truth lay in union by love, it became self-evident that theology was itself destroying what it ought to produce." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"The wife did not leave her own room, the husband had not been at home for three days. The children ran wild all over the house; the English governess quarreled with the housekeeper, and wrote" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Vronsky saw nothing and no one. He felt himself as a king, not because she had made an impression on Anna-he did not yet believe that-but because the impression she had made on him gave him happiness and pride." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"As long as he followed the fixed definition of obscure words such as spirit, will, freedom, essence, purposely letting himself go into the snare of words the philosophers set for him, he seemed to comprehend something. But he had only to forget the artificial train of reasoning, and to turn from life itself to what had satisfied him while thinking in accordance with the fixed definitions, and all this artificial edifice fell to pieces at once like a house of cards, and it became clear that the edifice had been built up out of those transposed words, apart from anything in life more important than reason." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"The next Post brought a reply from the starets, who wrote to him that the cause of all his trouble lay in his pride. His Wrathful Outburst, the starets explained, had come about because it was not for God that he had humbled himself, rejecting honours and advancement in the church - not for God, but to satisfy his own pride, to be able to tell himself how virtuous he was, seeking nothing for self. That was why he had not been able to endure the Superior's conduct. Because he felt that he had given up everything for God, and now he was being put on display, like some strange beast."If it were for God you had given up advancement, you would have let it pass.worldly pride is still alive in you." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"He saw either death or the approach of it everywhere. But his undertaking now occupied him all the more. He had to live his life to the end, until death came. Darkness covered everything for him; but precisely because of this darkness he felt that his undertaking was the only guiding thread in this darkness, and he seized it and held on to it with all his remaining strength." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"In order to undertake anything in family life, it is necessary that there be either complete discord between the spouses or loving harmony." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Before any definite step can be taken in a household, there must be either complete division or loving accord between husband and wife." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Who am I? I am that which thou hast searched for since thy baby eyes gazed wonderingly upon the world, whose horizon hides this real life from thee. I am that which in thy heart thou hast prayed for, demanded as thy birthright, although thou hast not known what it was. I am that which has lain in thy soul for hundreds and thousands of years. Sometimes I lay in thee grieving because thou didst not recognize me; sometimes I raised my head, opened my eyes, and extended my arms calling thee either tenderly and quietly, or strenuously, demanding that thou shouldst rebel against the iron chains which bound thee to the earth." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Well, pray if you like, only you'd do better to use your judgment." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"But to us of a later generation...it is inconceivable that millions of Christian men should have killed and tortured each other, because Napoleon was ambitious, Alexander firm, English policy crafty, and the Duke of Oldenburg hardly treated. We cannot grasp the connections between these circumstances and the bare fact of murder and violence, nor why the duke's wrongs should induce thousands of men from the other side of Europe to pillage and murder the inhabitants of the Smolensk and Moscow provinces and to be slaughtered by them." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Here it is. Let's say you're married, you love your wife, but you're attracted by another woman.''Excuse me, but I absolutely cannot understand how after eating my fill here I could go past a bakery and steal a roll." ~ Leo Tolstoy
"Her maternal instinct told her Natasha had too much of something, and because of this she would not be happy" ~ Leo Tolstoy
"What is reason given me for, if I am not to use it to avoid bringing unhappy beings into the world!" ~ Leo Tolstoy
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There's a lot of interesting words, nomenclatures, in science."
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