Top 183 Quotes

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Favorite 183 Quotes

1. "{When Abraham Lincoln was 26 years old in 1835, he wrote a defense of Thomas Paine's deism; a political associate, Samuel Hill, burned it to save Lincoln's political career. Historian Roy Basler, the editor of Lincoln's papers, said Paine had a strong influence on Lincoln's style:}No other writer of the eighteenth century, with the exception of Jefferson, parallels more closely the temper or gist of Lincoln's later thought. In style, Paine above all others affords the variety of eloquence which, chastened and adapted to Lincoln's own mood, is revealed in Lincoln's formal writings."
Author: Abraham Lincoln
2. "Apprendre n'est pas savoir; il y a les sachants et les savants : c'est la mémoire qui fait les uns, c'est la philosophie qui fait les autres. (p. 183)"
Author: Alexandre Dumas
3. "Smiles that are meant to hide something never last very long, especially when the smile is hiding guilt (pg. 183)."
Author: Amy Kathleen Ryan
4. "Perhaps that was the point; life, if you did it right, meant learning and changing. If you didn't, you died- or stopped growing - which amounted to more or less the same thing. So I would slide in and out of different roles until I discovered the one that fit me best.-Deuce, (183)"
Author: Ann Aguirre
5. "Sydney's the kind of port that leaves a mark on a sailor," the old man mused. "Really?" Haakon said, wondering what the man meant. "It did on me," he said, opening up his shirt to display his chest. It was covered with tattoos! At the top, SYDNEY was printed in elaborate red and blue letters. Beneath that was an enticing selection of names and dates. "Mary, 1838...Adella, 1840..." The old sailor began laughing. "Beatrice, 1843...Helen, 1846." And then finally, "Mother." There was no date after "Mother." "Mothers you love forever," he said. Everybody laughed then, including Haakon, though the thought brought some sadness to his heart. He did love his mother forever, and he missed her as well."
Author: Bonnie Bryant Hiller
6. "I myself found a fascinating example of this in Nietzsche's book Thus Spake Zarathustra, where the author reproduces almost word for word an incident reported in a ship's log for the year 1686. By sheer chance I had read this seaman's yarn in a book published about 1835 (half a century before Nietzsche wrote); and when I found the similar passage in Thus Spake Zarathustra, I was struck by its peculiar style, which was different from Nietzsche's usual language. I was convinced that Nietzsche must also have seen the old book, though he made no reference to it. I wrote to his sister, who was still alive, and she confirmed that she and her brother had in fact read the book together when he was 11 years old. I think, from the context, it is inconceivable that Nietzsche had any idea that he was plagiarizing this story. I believe that fifty years later it has unexpectedly slipped into focus in his conscious mind."
Author: C.G. Jung
7. "And why does England thus persecute the votaries of her science? Why does she depress them to the level of her hewers of wood and her drawers of water? Is it because science flatters no courtier, mingles in no political strife? ... Can we behold unmoved the science of England, the vital principle of her arts, struggling for existence, the meek and unarmed victim of political strife?[Reviewing Charles Babbage's Book, Reflections on the Decline of Science in England (1830)]"
Author: David Brewster
8. "Many of them were familiar from childhood with the fables of La Fontaine. Or they had read Voltaire or Racine or Molière in English translations. But that was about the sum of any familiarity they had with French literature. And none, of course, could have known in advance that the 1830s and '40s in Paris were to mark the beginning of the great era of Victor Hugo, Balzac, George Sand, and Baudelaire, not to say anything of Delacroix in painting or Chopin and Liszt in music."
Author: David McCullough
9. "Steamboats by this time were becoming a familiar presence on the rivers and coastal waters of America, but not until 1838 did steam-powered ships cross the Atlantic."
Author: David McCullough
10. "Their roar is around me. I am on the brink Of the great waters—and their anthem voiceGoes up amid the rainbow and the mist.Their chorus shakes the ground. I feel the rocksO'er which my feet hang idly—as they hungO'er babbling brooks in boyhood—quiveringUnder the burst of music. Awful voice! And strong, triumphant waters! Do I standIndeed amid your shoutings! Is it mineTo shout on this gray summit, where the bird,The cloudy, monarch bird shrieks from his crag,O'er which he's wheeled for centuries? I lift upMy cry in echo; but no sound is there,And my shout seems but whisper. Extract from the poem "Niagara" by Grenville Mellen, 1839."
Author: Deborah L. Halliday
11. "Young poets are too apt to consider themselves "children of the mist" – they must dwell apart from men and contemn their kind, or they fear they shall be only taken for common-place characters. They forget that poetry is the language which speaks to all hearts—and that instead of cherishing the sacred fire as a lonely light, as one that burns in a charnel house, they should bring it forth in its beauty and brightness as a guide to the pleasant places and sparkling waters of earth's happiness and the radiant messenger of heaven's exalted hopes. And they should rejoice and be glad that to them the kindling of such high imagination is given. ~ Sarah Josepha Hale Ladies Magazine, November 1830From the Introduction to Cherishing the Sacred Fire"
Author: Deborah L. Halliday
12. "I intend to put up with nothing that I can put down."[Letter to J. Beauchamp Jones, August 8, 1839]"
Author: Edgar Allan Poe
13. "Since 1849 I have studied incessantly, under all its aspects, a question which was already in my mind since 1832. I confess that my scheme is still a mere dream, and I do not shut my eyes to the fact that so long as I alone believe it to be possible, it is virtually impossible. ... The scheme in question is the cutting of a canal through the Isthmus of Suez. This has been thought of from the earliest historical times, and for that very reason is looked upon as impracticable. Geographical dictionaries inform us indeed that the project would have been executed long ago but for insurmountable obstacles. [On his inspiration for the Suez Canal.]"
Author: Ferdinand De Lesseps
14. "Silentium![1]?????, ????????? ? ???? ??????? ? ????? ???? —?????? ? ???????? ????????????? ? ??????´? ????????????, ??? ??????´ ? ????, —??????? ??? — ? ?????.??? ?????? ????????? ???????????? ??? ?????? ??????????? ?? ??, ??? ?? ???????????? ??????´???? ???? ????.???????, ????????? ?????, —??????? ??? — ? ?????.???? ???? ? ???? ????? ???? —???? ????? ??? ? ???? ????????????????-????????? ???;?? ??????´? ???????? ???,??????? ???????´? ????, —?????? ?? ????? — ? ?????!..1830"
Author: Fyodor Tyutchev
15. "Immodest creature, you do not want a woman who will accept your faults, you want the one who pretends you are faultless – one who will caress the hand that strikes her and kiss the lips that lie to her."(Letter, 17 June 1837)"
Author: George Sand
16. "J'ai un but, une tâche, disons le mot, une passion. Le métier d'écrire en est une violente et presque indestructible."("I have an object, a task, let me say the word, a passion. The profession of writing is a violent and almost indestructible one.")[Letter to Jules Boucoiran, 4 March 1831]"
Author: George Sand
17. "England has her Stratford, Scotland has her Alloway, and America, too, has her Dresden. For there, on August 11, 1833, was born the greatest and noblest of the Western World; an immense personality, -- unique, lovable, sublime; the peerless orator of all time, and as true a poet as Nature ever held in tender clasp upon her loving breast, and, in words coined for the chosen few, told of the joys and sorrows, hopes, dreams, and fears of universal life; a patriot whose golden words and deathless deeds were worthy of the Great Republic; a philanthropist, real and genuine; a philosopher whose central theme was human love, -- who placed 'the holy hearth of home' higher than the altar of any god; an iconoclast, a builder -- a reformer, perfectly poised, absolutely honest, and as fearless as truth itself -- the most aggressive and formidable foe of superstition -- the most valiant champion of reason -- Robert G. Ingersoll."
Author: Greatest
18. "Znaš li da je mladi školski naraštaj silno glup ? Nekada je imao više pameti; zabavljao se ženama, macevanjem, orgijama; sad se doteruje po Bajronu, sanja o ocaju i do mile volje okiva sebi srce ... Utrkuju se ko ce imati blede lice i najlepše reci : sit sam sveta ! Sit sveta ! Žalosno zaista : sit sveta u osamnaestoj godini ! Zar ne postoji više ljubav, slava, poslovi ? Zar je sve umrlo ? Nema više prirode, nema cveca za mladog coveka ? Ostavimo se jednom toga. Dajmo se na tugu u umetnosti, pošto više osecamo tu stranu, ali dajmo se veselju u životu; neka puca zapušac, neka se drolja svlaci, sto mu muka ! Pa ako nam neke veceri, u sumrak, dok za jedan cas traju magla i sneg, dode neka dosada života, pustimo je neka dode, ali ne cesto. Treba sebi cešati srce s vremena na vreme sa malo bola, da sva gamad sa njega spadne. To je to što tebi savetujem, što se ja trudim da primenim. – Ernestu Ševalijeu, 15. Aprila 1839"
Author: Gustave Flaubert
19. "I am fascinated by all the new technology that creates places for us to meet in what is called cyberspace. I understand what it must have meant for the rebellions in the 19th century, especially in 1830 and 1848, when the mass circulated newspaper became so important for the spreading of information."
Author: Henning Mankell
20. "On March 4th, 1830, I arrived in London, where a new world seemed opened to me."
Author: Henry Bessemer
21. "In 1833, protection was abandoned, and a tariff was established by which it was provided that we should, in a few years, have a system of merely revenue duties."
Author: Henry Charles Carey
22. "In the period from 1824 to 1833, the tendency was steadily in the former direction, but it was only in the latter part of it that it was made really efficient."
Author: Henry Charles Carey
23. "Grant Foreman, the leading authority on Indian removal, estimates that during confinement in the stockade or on the march westward four thousand Cherokees died. In December 1838, President Van Buren spoke to Congress: It affords sincere pleasure to apprise the Congress of the entire removal of the Cherokee Nation of Indians to their new homes west of the Mississippi. The measures authorized by Congress at its last session have had the happiest effects."
Author: Howard Zinn
24. "It may not be easy, in every possible case, to trace the line of separation between the rights of religion and the Civil authority with such distinctness as to avoid collisions and doubts on unessential points. The tendency to usurpation on one side or the other, or to a corrupting coalition or alliance between them, will be best guarded agst. by an entire abstinence of the Govt. from interference in any way whatsoever, beyond the necessity of preserving public order, and protecting each sect agst. trespasses on its legal rights by others.[Letter to the Reverend Jasper Adams, January 1, 1832]"
Author: James Madison
25. "De ce sa scap? De prezent? Da, de acest prim-plan care-mi ascunde ce se intampla in perspectiva. Daca am spirit sau suflet, spuneti-i cum vreti, nu e unul singur, ci multiplu. Nu se poate multumi cu limitarea, el vrea spatiu. Poate sa locuiasca in numeroase trupuri schimbatoare, intrate in putrefactie, din viitor sau din trecut. (...) Otravita sau nu, mercurul ma face sa gandesc astfel. Daca-i dati drumul, va tremura in clone pe toata podeaua, dar il puteti aduna la loc si nu se va vedea nicio sutura, nicio urma c-ar fi fost imprastiat. Aveti o singura viata sau nenumarate vieti, depinde ce va doriti." (pag 183)"
Author: Jeanette Winterson
26. "My dad was a different person when he lectured: his eyes sparkled, his lips turned upward.... 'Think what it must have been like for Darwin, two hundred years ago. He took that voyage on the Beagle [1831] expecting to document the natural world and he stumbled across something impossible. A creature who could defy the laws of physics--straight out of the pages of mythology...In that one moment, the entire landscape of scientific investigation was drastically and irrevocably changed. The impossible became a widespread scientific reality, as omnipresent as gravity and in some cases, nearly as hard to see."
Author: Jennifer Lynn Barnes
27. "Lyell and Poulett Scrope, in this country, resumed the work of the Italians and of Hutton; and the former, aided by a marvellous power of clear exposition, placed upon an irrefragable basis the truth that natural causes are competent to account for all events, which can be proved to have occurred, in the course of the secular changes which have taken place during the deposition of the stratified rocks. The publication of 'The Principles of Geology,' in 1830, constituted an epoch in geological science. But it also constituted an epoch in the modern history of the doctrines of evolution, by raising in the mind of every intelligent reader this question: If natural causation is competent to account for the not-living part of our globe, why should it not account for the living part?"
Author: Lyell
28. "I came in with Halley's Comet in 1835. It is coming again next year, and I expect to go out with it. It will be the greatest disappointment of my life if I don't go out with Halley's Comet. The Almighty has said, no doubt: "Now here are these two unaccountable freaks; they came in together, they must go out together."
Author: Mark Twain
29. "?????? ? ????????? ?????? ???? 1835 ?. ?????????? ?????? ?? ???? ?????? ? ??????? ?? ?? ????? ? ???. ?? ???? ???-???????? ????????????? ? ?????? ??, ??? ?? ?? ????? ? ????????? ??????. ????????? ??? ???????? ? ?????: "??? ??? ?????????? ???????; ??????? ??????, ?????? ? ?? ?? ?????? ??????"."
Author: Mark Twain
30. "In the Steven F. Austin Colony, which was the first colony, Texans first established a provisional government in 1835 with the intention of writing a declaration of independence soon after."
Author: Michael McCaul
31. "The French writer Edmond About, who visited Greece in 1832, a dozen years after its independence, reports how peasants struggled with the metric system as it was completely unnatural to them and stuck to Ottoman standards instead."
Author: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
32. "The modern idea of testing a reader's "comprehension," as distinct from something else a reader may be doing, would have seemed an absurdity in 1790 or 1830 or 1860. What else was reading but comprehending?"
Author: Neil Postman
33. "By 1833 the largest publisher in America, Harper and Company, boasted one horse-powered printing press and seven hand presses while the American Bible Society owned 16 new state-of-the-art, steam-driven presses and 20 hand presses."
Author: Phil Cooke
34. "The Lord is much like the air around us. The air is all around us, it is everywhere. Even though we can't see it, it is there, we know it is there, because we are breathing. The Lord is everywhere too, you can't see Him, but He is there, we know He is there, because we are breathing. (Page 183)"
Author: Raymond D. Reifinger III
35. "From 1836, down to last year, there is no proof of the Government having any confidence in the duration of peace, or possessing increased security against war."
Author: Richard Cobden
36. "As a man without forethought scarcely deserves the name of a man, so forethought without reflection is but a metaphorical phrase for the instinct of a beast.- (1772-1834)"
Author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
37. "Dear Sixpence,I saved them all, you know. Every letter you ever sent, even those to which I never replied. I'm sorry for so many things, my love: that I leftyou; that I never came home; that it took me so long to realize that you were my home and that, with you by my side, none of the restmattered.But in the darkest hours, on the coldest nights, when I felt I'd lost everything, I still had your letters. And through them, in some small way,I still had you.I loved you then, my darling Penelope, more than I could imagine—just as I love you now, more than you can know.MichaelHell House, February 1831"
Author: Sarah MacLean
38. "Goethe died in 1832. As you know, Goethe was very active in science. In fact, he did some very good scientific work in plant morphology and mineralogy. But he was quite bitter at the way in which many scientists refused to grant him a hearing because he was a poet and therefore, they felt, he couldn't be serious."
Author: Stephen Jay Gould
39. "Babbage had most of this system sketched out by 1837, but the first true computer to use this programmable architecture didn't appear for more than a hundred years."
Author: Steven Johnson
40. "Many people in Nixon's camp had genuine faith in affirmative action. It wasn't designed to fail, but it wasn't designed to succeed, either; the intent behind it was not rooted in a desire to help black people attain equal standing in society. It was riot insurance. It was a financial incentive for blacks to stay in their own communities and out of the suburbs. (183)"
Author: Tanner Colby
41. "Ten years after the Boston Tea Party, tea was still far more popular than coffee, which only became the more popular drink in the mid-nineteenth century. Coffee's popularity grew after the duty on imports was abolished in 1832, making it more affordable. The duty was briefly reintroduced during the Civil War but was abolished again in 1872."
Author: Tom Standage
42. "At five in the morning, some policemen, unannounced, entered the house of a man named Pardon, later a member of the section of the Barricade-Merry, and still later killed in the insurrection of April 1834, found him standing not far from his bed, with cartridges in his hands, caught in the act."
Author: Victor Hugo
43. "Alamo has been a strong inspiration for nations striving for freedom all around the globe since 1836. Gvozdansko has not earned public reputation, but profoundly touched the heart of the bitter enemy Ferhat-paša alone in 1578. Croats have a duty and obligation to learn about Gvozdansko."
Author: Vinko Vrbanic
44. "The acquisition of knowledge always involves the revelation of ignorance - almost is the revelation of ignorance. Our knowledge of the world instructs us first of all that the world is greater than our knowledge of it. To those who rejoice in the abundance and intricacy in Creation, this is a source of joy, as it is to those who rejoice in freedom...To those would-be solvers of "the human problem," who hope for knowledge equal to (capable of controlling) the world, it is a source of unremitting defeat and bewilderment. The evidence is overwhelming that knowledge does not solve "the human problem." Indeed, the evidence overwhelmingly suggests - with Genesis - that knowledge is the problem. Or perhaps we should say instead that all our problems tend to gather under two questions about knowledge: Having the ability and desire to know, how and what should we learn? And, having learned, how and for what should we use what we know? (pg. 183, People, Land, and Community)"
Author: Wendell Berry
45. "Books let us into their souls and lay open to us the secrets of our own."[The Sick Chamber (The New Monthly Magazine , August 1830)]"
Author: William Hazlitt

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White people get nervous and speed things up. You don't have to be in a hurry because you ain't got nothing to gain and you ain't got nothin' to lose. And that's where the groove lies."
Author: Billy Gibbons

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