Top 184 Quotes

Browse top 42 famous quotes and sayings about 184 by most favorite authors.

Favorite 184 Quotes

1. "Insofar as we appreciate order, it is when we perceive it as being accompanied by complexity, when we feel that a variety of elements has been brought to order--that windows, doors and other details have been knitted into a scheme that manages to be at once regular and intricate. (p184)"
Author: Alain De Botton
2. "Sleep is a very capricious goddess, and it is precisely when she is invoked that she delays coming.- Page 184"
Author: Alexandre Dumas
3. "Even beyond the Middle East, the role of the independent women remains as warped as a Lewis Caroll novel. We may control $12 trillion of the world's $184 trillion in annual consumer spending (I read it in Newsweek), and yet our self-worth apparently ccomes in a shampoo bottle ("because you're worth it")."
Author: Amy Mowafi
4. "It was a masterpiece. Nobody bought it. (re: Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway, 1844)"
Author: Anthony Bailey
5. "...we, and I mean humans, are meaning makers. We do not discover the meanings of mysterious things, we invent them. We make meanings because meaninglessness terrifies us above all things. More than snakes, even. More than falling, or the dark. We trick ourselves into seeing meanings in things, when in fact all we are doing is grafting our meanings onto the universe to comfort ourselves. We gild the chaos of the universe with our symbols. To admit that something is meaningless is just like falling backward into darkness." (p184)"
Author: Benjamin Hale
6. "In the early 1800s there arose in England a fashion for inhaling nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, after it was discovered that its use ‘was attended by a highly pleasurable thrilling11'. For the next half-century it would be the drug of choice for young people. One learned body, the Askesian Society, was for a time devoted to little else. Theatres put on ‘laughing gas evenings'12 where volunteers could refresh themselves with a robust inhalation and then entertain the audience with their comical staggerings. It wasn't until 1846 that anyone got around to finding a practical use for nitrous oxide, as an anaesthetic. Goodness knows how many tens of thousands of people suffered unnecessary agonies under the surgeon's knife because no-one had thought of the gas's most obvious practical application."
Author: Bill Bryson
7. "Mrs Loudon was even more successful than her husband thanks to a single work, Practical Instructions in Gardening for Ladies, published in 1841, which proved to be magnificently timely. It was the first book of any type ever to encourage women of elevated classes to get their hands dirty and even to take on a faint glow of perspiration. This was novel almost to the point of eroticism. Gardening for Ladies bravely insisted that women could manage gardening independent of male supervision if they simply observed a few sensible precautions – working steadily but not too vigorously, using only light tools, never standing on damp ground because of the unhealthful emanations that would rise up through their skirts."
Author: Bill Bryson
8. "The poet Robert Browning caused considerable consternation by including the word twat in one of his poems, thinking it an innocent term. The work was Pippa Passes, written in 1841 and now remembered for the line "God's in His heaven, all's right with the world." But it also contains this disconcerting passage: Then owls and batsCowls and twatsMonks and nuns in a cloister's moods,Adjourn to the oak-stump pantry!Browning had apparently somewhere come across the word twat--which meant precisely the same then as it does now--but pronounced it with a flat a and somehow took it to mean a piece of headgear for nuns. The verse became a source of twittering amusement for generations of schoolboys and a perennial embarrassment to their elders, but the word was never altered and Browning was allowed to live out his life in wholesome ignorance because no one could think of a suitably delicate way of explaining his mistake to him."
Author: Bill Bryson
9. "Sydney's the kind of port that leaves a mark on a sailor," the old man mused. "Really?" Haakon said, wondering what the man meant. "It did on me," he said, opening up his shirt to display his chest. It was covered with tattoos! At the top, SYDNEY was printed in elaborate red and blue letters. Beneath that was an enticing selection of names and dates. "Mary, 1838...Adella, 1840..." The old sailor began laughing. "Beatrice, 1843...Helen, 1846." And then finally, "Mother." There was no date after "Mother." "Mothers you love forever," he said. Everybody laughed then, including Haakon, though the thought brought some sadness to his heart. He did love his mother forever, and he missed her as well."
Author: Bonnie Bryant Hiller
10. "8. Quoted in Clive Leatherdale, Dracula: The Novel and the Legend (Wellingborough, Northants: Aquarian Press, 1985), p. 80. 9. H. G. Wells, The War of the Worlds (Leipzig: Tauchnitz, 1898), Book II, Ch. II, p. 202. 10. Ibid., pp. 201, 200. 11. E. J. Hobsbawm, Industry and Empire (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1969), p. 192. 12. On this important subject, see Daniel Pick's Faces of Degeneration: A European Disorder c. 1848 – c. 1918 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989) and his ‘ "Terrors of the night": Dracula and "Degeneration" in the Late Nineteenth Century', Critical Quarterly (Winter 1988). 13. For an account of and extracts from books such as these, see The Victorian Imagination: A Sampler, ed. Richard Manton (New York: Grove"
Author: Bram Stoker
11. "I think records were just a little bubble through time and those who made a living from them for a while were lucky. There is no reason why anyone should have made so much money from selling records except that everything was right for this period of time. I always knew it would run out sooner or later. It couldn't last, and now it's running out. I don't particularly care that it is and like the way things are going. The record age was just a blip. It was a bit like if you had a source of whale blubber in the 1840s and it could be used as fuel. Before gas came along, if you traded in whale blubber, you were the richest man on Earth. Then gas came along and you'd be stuck with your whale blubber. Sorry mate – history's moving along. Recorded music equals whale blubber. Eventually, something else will replace it."
Author: Brian Eno
12. "My debut upon the world's stage occurred on February 26, 1845, in the State of Iowa."
Author: Buffalo Bill
13. "But will anyone again look at that tree, read that poem, love a dog in quite my way? I am a particular and, despite the commonness of all people, a unique person in the way I perceive and think and appreciate, and I am sad that this particularity shall before too long be gone. This is not arrogance; it is the simple truth, known to anyone who has loved a person dead in the fullness of her life: what we miss is the particularity, that unique voice. [pp. 184-185]"
Author: Carolyn G. Heilbrun
14. "Her nomination for vice president in 2008 represents the most desperate inclinations of the Republican Party. In two hundred years, I suspect historians will use Palin as an example of how insane America became in the decade following the destruction of the World Trade Center, and her origin story will seem as extraterrestrial and eccentric as Abe Lincoln jumping out of a window to undermine a voting quorum in 1840."
Author: Chuck Klosterman
15. "Al levantar los velos para mostrar como los mitos de la modernidad se iban formando a partir de la Resstauracion, Balzac nos ayuda a identificar la profunda continuidad que subyace en la aparente ruptura radical que se produce a partir de 1848."
Author: David Harvey
16. "How about this? Hong Kong had been appropriated by British drug pushers in the 1840s. We wanted Chinese silk, porcelain, and spices. The Chinese didn't want our clothes, tools, or salted herring, and who can blame them? They had no demand. Our solution was to make a demand, by getting large sections of the populace addicted to opium, a drug which the Chinese government had outlawed. When the Chinese understandably objected to this arrangement, we kicked the fuck out of them, set up a puppet government in Peking that hung signs on parks saying NO DOGS OR CHINESE, and occupied this corner of their country as an import base. Fucking godawful behavior, when you think about it. And we accuse them of xenophobia. It would be like the Colombians invading Washington in the early twenty-first century and forcing the White House to legalize heroin. And saying, "Don't worry, we'll show ourselves out, and take Florida while we're at it, okay? Thanks very much."
Author: David Mitchell
17. "Did I not feel that the time has come for the questions of women's wrongs to be laid before the public? Did I not believe that women herself must do this work, for women alone understand the height, the depth, the breadth of her degradation. - Seneca Falls Convention, 1848"
Author: Elizabeth Cady Stanton
18. "These estimates may well be enhanced by one from F. Klein (1849-1925), the leading German mathematician of the last quarter of the nineteenth century. 'Mathematics in general is fundamentally the science of self-evident things.' ... If mathematics is indeed the science of self-evident things, mathematicians are a phenomenally stupid lot to waste the tons of good paper they do in proving the fact. Mathematics is abstract and it is hard, and any assertion that it is simple is true only in a severely technical sense—that of the modern postulational method which, as a matter of fact, was exploited by Euclid. The assumptions from which mathematics starts are simple; the rest is not."
Author: Eric Temple Bell
19. "Like Molière's M. Jourdain, who spoke prose all his life without knowing it, mathematicians have been reasoning for at least two millennia without being aware of all the principles underlying what they were doing. The real nature of the tools of their craft has become evident only within recent times A renaissance of logical studies in modern times begins with the publication in 1847 of George Boole's 'The Mathematical Analysis of Logic'."
Author: Ernest Nagel
20. "In 1844, there was a balance of perhaps of a couple of thousand dollars on the cr side."
Author: Ezra Cornell
21. "Since 1849 I have studied incessantly, under all its aspects, a question which was already in my mind since 1832. I confess that my scheme is still a mere dream, and I do not shut my eyes to the fact that so long as I alone believe it to be possible, it is virtually impossible. ... The scheme in question is the cutting of a canal through the Isthmus of Suez. This has been thought of from the earliest historical times, and for that very reason is looked upon as impracticable. Geographical dictionaries inform us indeed that the project would have been executed long ago but for insurmountable obstacles. [On his inspiration for the Suez Canal.]"
Author: Ferdinand De Lesseps
22. "Dari semua yang tertulis, aku hanya mencintai apa yang ditulis seseorang dengan darahnya sendiri." --Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)"
Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
23. "Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) was a German philosopher. His writing included critiques of religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy, and science, using a distinctive style and displaying a fondness for aphorism. Nietzsche's influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism. Nietzsche began his career as a philologist before turning to philosophy. At the age of 24 he became Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, but resigned in 1879 due to health problems, which would plague him for most of his life. In 1889 he exhibited symptoms of a serious mental illness, living out his remaining years in the care of his mother and sister until his death in 1900."
Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
24. "1846)"
Author: Fyodor Dostoyevsky
25. "Then we kissed for about 25 years, I think." (184)"
Author: Geoff Herbach
26. "Is not this a true autumn day? Just the still melancholy that I love - that makes life and nature harmonise. The birds are consulting about their migrations, the trees are putting on the hectic or the pallid hues of decay, and begin to strew the ground, that one's very footsteps may not disturb the repose of earth and air, while they give us a scent that is a perfect anodyne to the restless spirit. Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it, and if I were a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns."[Letter to Miss Eliot, Oct. 1, 1841]"
Author: George Eliot
27. "Kita tak jadi bijaksana, bersih hati dan bahagia karena membaca buku petunjuk yang judulnya bermula dengan "How to"...Kita harus terjun kadang hanyut, kadang berenang dalam pengalaman. Kita harus berada dalam perbuatan, dalam merenung dan merasakan dalam laku. Ujian dan hasil ditentukan di sana (Caping 1, h. 184)"
Author: Goenawan Mohamad
28. "I am fascinated by all the new technology that creates places for us to meet in what is called cyberspace. I understand what it must have meant for the rebellions in the 19th century, especially in 1830 and 1848, when the mass circulated newspaper became so important for the spreading of information."
Author: Henning Mankell
29. "Mexico surrendered. There were calls among Americans to take all of Mexico. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, signed February 1848, just took half. The Texas boundary was set at the Rio Grande; New Mexico and California were ceded. The United States paid Mexico $15 million, which led the Whig Intelligencer to conclude that "we take nothing by conquest. . . . Thank God."
Author: Howard Zinn
30. "In the summer of 1845 Edward Little was sixteen years old and restless in his blood."
Author: James Carlos Blake
31. "We are born in this cemetery, but must not despair.-Piet Soron, 1847"
Author: Jesse Ball
32. "I must have wondered if the police were right, if the entire story was a figment of my imagination. This is the worst impact of severe trauma: the victim loses faith in the evidence of her own senses. And this is the great gift Paul Macone gave to me. He believed what I told the police back then. He believed me enough to try to solve the case, and he did.Perhaps because I've sought out evil in this world, attempting to understand and tame it, I am particularly moved by goodness. There is a light that animates an act of generosity, when a person is kind - not to call attention to his own goodness, or to make a pact with God, but just because he feels it's right. I see this light in Paul Macone. Still, his kindness is almost too much to bear. I feel shy around him, despite this conversation. I even feel shy writing this down. (184)"
Author: Jessica Stern
33. "Hietzingin eläintarhassa on vain yksi ruokkiperheen edustaja. Se on pienin ruokkilaji, jota kuvataan pienikokoiseksi ja nuivanaamaiseksi ja aika tyhmäksi; sen tiedetään vaeltaneen pitkin polkuja, missä sen päälle saatettiin heposti astua. Itse asiassa kuningasruokki oli niin typerä lintu, että se kuoli sukupuuttoon. Viimeinen isoruokki nähtiin elävänä vuonna 1844 ja viimeinen kuollut isoruokki huuhtoutui rantaan Trinity Bayssa Irlannissa vuonna 1853. Isoruokki oli tarinan mukaan sekä utelias että herttainen. Jos sitä lähestyi varovasti, se saattoi pysyä liikkumatta paikoillaan. Sitä pyydystettiin muonaksi kalastusaluksille: kalastajat vaanivat rannalla, lähestyivät äänettömästi ja nuijivat isoruokit hengiltä.Olipa mahtava juttu! Tarkoittaako se, että isoruokki kuoli sukupuuttoon omaa tyhmyyttään - vai että tyhmät ihmiset tappoivat sen sukupuuttoon?"
Author: John Irving
34. "I am above the forest region, amongst grand rocks & such a torrent as you see in Salvator Rosa's paintings vegetation all a scrub of rhodos. with Pines below me as thick & bad to get through as our Fuegian Fagi on the hill tops, & except the towering peaks of P. S. [perpetual snow] that, here shoot up on all hands there is little difference in the mt scenery—here however the blaze of Rhod. flowers and various colored jungle proclaims a differently constituted region in a naturalist's eye & twenty species here, to one there, always are asking me the vexed question, where do we come from?[Letter to Charles Darwin 24 Jun 1849]"
Author: Joseph Dalton Hooker
35. "??? ?? ???????? ???? ??????? ??????? ? ??? ????? ?????: ???? ?? ??? ??? ?? ????? ??? ????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ????? ???? ???? ????? ?? ??? ???? ?? "??? ????? ?????????" ??? ?????? ????? ????? ?? ??? 1844 ???? ???? ????? ?? ????? ? ?????? ????? ???? ????? ???? ? ???? ???? ??? ? ?? ????? ?????. ??? ????? ?? ?? ????? ??????? ???? ???. ?? ???? ????? ? ????? ????? ?? ?? ????? ? ?????? ?? ?? ?? ???? ??? ??? ???? ?? ??? ???. ????? ?? ????? ????? ??? ?????? ??? ??? ?? ??? ??? ???????? ???? ????? ?? ?????? ???????? ??????? ?? ??????????? ????? ??? ????? ? ???????? ??? ????? ?? ????? ???????. ?????? ????? ???? ?????? ?? ????? ????? ??? ? ?? ?? ???."
Author: Kurt Vonnegut
36. "How subservient to Jesus, or to a humane God Almighty, were the leaders of this country back in the 1840's, when Marx said such a supposedly evil thing about religion? They had made it perfectly legal to own human slaves, and weren't going to led women vote or hold public office, God forbid, for another eighty year."
Author: Kurt Vonnegut
37. "The late great Horace Lloyd Swithin (1844-1917), British essayist, lecturer, satirist, and social observer, wrote in his autobiographical Appointments, 1890-1901 (1902), "When one travels abroad, one doesn't so much discover the hidden Wonders of the World, but the hidden wonders of the individuals with whom one is traveling. They may turn out to afford a stirring view, a rather dull landscape, or a terrain so treacherous one finds it's best to forget the entire affair and return home."
Author: Marisha Pessl
38. "I cannot endure to waste anything so precious as autumnal sunshine by staying in the house."[Notebook, Oct. 10, 1842]"
Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne
39. "The problem in the 19th century with information was that we lived in a culture of information scarcity, and so humanity addressed that problem beginning with photography and telegraphy and the - in the 1840s. We tried to solve the problem of overcoming the limitations of space, time, and form."
Author: Neil Postman
40. "The future science of government should be called 'la cybernétique' (1843){Coining the French word to mean 'the art of governing,' from the Greek (Kybernetes = navigator or steersman), subsequently adopted as cybernetics by Norbert Wiener for the field of control and communication theory.}"
Author: Norbert Wiener
41. "We must not falter nor weary in well-doing. We must lengthen our stride. Not only is our own eternal welfare at stake, but also the eternal welfare of many of our brothers and sisters who are not now members of this, the true Church. I thrill to the words of the Prophet Joseph Smith in a letter that he sent to the Church from Nauvoo on September 6, 1842: 'Shall we not go on in so great a cause? Go forward. … Courage … and on, on to the victory!"
Author: Spencer W. Kimball
42. "Here's a 165-year old but still fitting comment on public officials who are so sure they're right that they'll drive over a cliff rather than compromise: "Always to be right, always to trample forward, and never to doubt – are not these the great qualities with which dullness takes the lead in the world?" William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair: a Novel without a Hero (1848).The author's middle name really was "Makepeace." As the quote shows, he disliked those who would not."
Author: William Makepeace Thackeray

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[...] so important to believe in a concept of goodness, even if we make it up ourselves. We don't really make it up. it's there, isn't it?""Oh, yes, it's there," she said. "It's there because we put it there."
Author: Anne Rice

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