Top Arianne Quotes

Browse top 48 famous quotes and sayings about Arianne by most favorite authors.

Favorite Arianne Quotes

1. "With every fragment of rock that fall from me, I can hear the voice of Marianne Engle. I love you. Aishiteru. Ego amo te. Ti amo. Eg elska pig. Ich liebe dich. It is moving across time, coming to me in every language of the world, and it sounds like pure love."
Author: Andrew Davidson
2. "My words were Egyptian hieroglyphics before the discovery of the Rosetta stone; my words were wounded soldiers limping home, guns spent, from a lost battle; my words were dying fish, flipping hysterically as the net is opened and the pile spreads across the boat deck like a slippery mountain trying to become a prairie.My words were, and are, unworthy of Marianne Engel."
Author: Andrew Davidson
3. "This will mark the third time that an arrow has entered my chest. The first time brought me to Marianne Engel. The second time separated us.The third time will reunite us."
Author: Andrew Davidson
4. "Why don't you like getting close?' Marianne insisted. 'Is it because you might get hurt?' Owen shook his head. He still couldn't look at her. 'It's because it's never permanent. Everything dies. Everything gets destroyed. Even love. So we just make the best of it-get our pleasure where we can."
Author: Andrew Lane
5. "Marianne had sharp, cold eyes and she was spiteful but her father loved her."
Author: Angela Carter
6. "Two things put me in the spirit to give. One is that I have come to think of everyone with whom I come into contast as a patient in the emergency room. I see a lot of gaping wounds and dazed expressions. Or, as Marianne Moore put it, "The world's an orphan's home." And this feels more true than almost anything else I know. But so many of us can be soothed by writing: think of how many times you have opened a book, read one line, and said, "Yes!" And I want to give people that feeling, too, of connection, communication."
Author: Anne Lamott
7. "That thing ruined my favorite T-shirt," complains Mario."Whatever." It's Marianne's voice. "You were just looking for a reason to get your shirt off." I try to look around for her, but my neck refuses."
Author: Bill Blais
8. "[Marianne Moore] once remarked, after a visit to her brother and his family, that the state of being married and having children had one enormous advantage: "One never has to worry about whether one is doing the right thing or not. There isn't time. One is always having to go to the market or drive the children somewhere. There isn't time to wonder 'Is this right or isn't it?"
Author: Elizabeth Bishop
9. "Marianne Dashwood looks at gray skies and sees blue. That's all very well, and it's not something you ever want entirely to lose. But you must lose a little of it; otherwise you're going to get wet."
Author: Emma Thompson
10. "Shooting Willoughby carrying Marianne up the path. ... Male strength -- the desire to be cradled again? ... I'd love someone to pick me up and carry me off. Frightening. Lindsay assures me I'd start to fidget after a while. She's such a comfort."
Author: Emma Thompson
11. "Words are like arrows, Arianne. Once loosed, you cannot call them back. - Areo Hotah"
Author: George R.R. Martin
12. "My uncle always said that it was the sword in a man's hand that determined his wroth, not the one between his legs. - Arianne"
Author: George R.R. Martin
13. "Ser Arys was pleasant company abed, but wit and he were strangers. (Arianne Martell)"
Author: George R.R. Martin
14. "Las palabras son como flechas, Arianne. Una vez lanzadas no hay manera de hacerlas volver."
Author: George R.R. Martin
15. "Must you be in such haste to don your clothes, ser? I prefer you as you are. Abed, unclad, we are our truest selves, a man and a woman, lovers, one flesh, as close as two can be. Our clothes make us different people. - Arianne"
Author: George R.R. Martin
16. "Must I say it, ser? You call me love, yet you refuse me, when I have most desperate need of you. Is it so wrong of me to want a knight to keep me safe? - Arianne"
Author: George R.R. Martin
17. "I told them to place a cyvasse table in your chambers.""Who was I supposed to play with?""Yourself. Sometimes it is best to study a game before you attempt to play it. How well do you know the game, Arianne?""Well enough to play.""But not to win. My brother loved the fight for its own sake, but I only played such games as I can win."
Author: George R.R. Martin
18. "No, no," cried Marianne, "misery such as mine has no pride. I care not who knows that I am wretched. The triumph of seeing me so may be open to all the world. Elinor, Elinor, they who suffer little may be proud and independent as they like-may resist insult, or return mortification-but I cannot. I must feel-I must be wretched-and they are welcome to enjoy the consciousness of it that can."
Author: Jane Austen
19. "Dear, dear Norland,' said Elinor, 'probably looks much as it always does at this time of year. The woods and walks thickly covered with dead leaves.' 'Oh!' cried Marianne, 'with what transporting sensations have I formerly seen them fall! How have I delighted, as I walked, to see them driven in showers about me by the wind! What feelings have they, the season, the air altogether inspired! Now there is no one to regard them. They are seen only as a nuisance, swept hastily off, and driven as much as possible from the sight.' 'It is not everyone,' said Elinor, 'who has your passion for dead leaves."
Author: Jane Austen
20. "Elinor, for shame!" said Marianne, "money can only give happiness where there is nothing else to give it. Beyond a competence, it can afford no real satisfaction, as far as mere self is concerned."
Author: Jane Austen
21. "I cannot, I cannot,' cried Marianne; 'leave me, leave me, if I distress you; leave me, hate me, forget me! But do not torture me so. Oh! how easy for those who have no sorrow of their own to talk of extertion!"
Author: Jane Austen
22. "Me!" returned Elinor in some confusion; "indeed, Marianne, I have nothing to tell." "Nor I," answered Marianne with energy, "our situations then are alike. We have neither of us anything to tell; you, because you do not communicate, and I, because I conceal nothing." (27.17)"
Author: Jane Austen
23. "Marianne would have thought herself very inexcusable had she been able to sleep at all the first night after parting from Willoughby. She would have been ashamed to look her family in the face the next morning, had she not risen from her bed in more need of repose than when she lay down in it. But the feelings which made such composure a disgrace, left her in no danger of incurring it. She was awake the whole night, and she wept the greatest part of it. She got up with an head-ache, was unable to talk, and unwilling to take any nourishment; giving pain every moment to her mother and sisters, and forbidding all attempt at consolation from either. Her sensibility was potent enough!"
Author: Jane Austen
24. "The immediate advantage to herself was by no means inconsiderable, for it supplied her with endless jokes against them both. At the park she laughed at the colonel, and in the cottage at Marianne. To the former her raillery was probably, as far as it regarded only himself, perfectly indifferent; but to the latter it was at first incomprehensible; and when its object was understood, she hardly knew whether most to laugh at its absurdity, or censure its impertinence, for she considered it as an unfeeling reflection on the colonel's advanced years, and on his forlorn condition as an old bachelor."
Author: Jane Austen
25. "But I must object to your dooming Colonel Brandon and his wife to the constant confinement of a sick chamber, merely because he chanced to complain yesterday (a very cold damp day) of a slight rheumatic feel in one of his shoulders." "But he talked of flannel waistcoats," said Marianne; "and with me a flannel waistcoat is invariably connected with the aches, cramps, rheumatisms, and every species of ailment that can afflict the old and the feeble."
Author: Jane Austen
26. "At first sight, his address is certainly not striking; and his person can hardly be called handsome, till the expression of his eyes, which are uncommonly good, and the general sweetness of his countenance, is perceived. At present, I know him so well, that I think him really handsome; or at least, almost so. What say you, Marianne?"
Author: Jane Austen
27. "And yet two thousand a year is a very moderate income," said Marianne. "A family cannot well be maintained on a smaller. I am sure I am not extravagant in my demands. A proper establishment of servants, a carriage, perhaps two, and hunters, cannot be supported on less."
Author: Jane Austen
28. "From a night of more sleep than she had expected, Marianne awoke the next morning to the same consciousness of misery in which she had closed her eyes."
Author: Jane Austen
29. "Marianne was vexed at it for her sister's sake, and turned her eyes towards Elinor to see how she bore these attacks, with an earnestness which gave Elinor far more pain than could arise from such common-place raillery as Mrs. Jennings's."
Author: Jane Austen
30. "His emotion on entering the room, in seeing her altered looks, and in receiving the pale hand which she immediately held out to him, was such as, in Elinor's conjecture, must arise from something more than his affection for Marianne, or the consciousness of its being known to others; and she soon discovered, in his melancholy eye and varying complexion as he looked at her sister, the probable recurrence of many past scenes of misery to his mind, brought back by that resemblance between Marianne and Eliza already acknowledged, and now strengthened by the hollow eye, the sickly skin, the posture of reclining weakness; and the warm acknowledgment of peculiar obligation."
Author: Jane Austen
31. "Ama Marianne serbestlik gerçek bir utanç ihtimali tasimiyorsa her türlü gizlilikten nefret ediyordu; kendi içlerinde ayip olmayan duygulari kisitlamayi amaçlamak ona sadece gereçksiz bir çaba degil, ayni zamanda aklin bayagi ve hatali görüslere utanç verici bir biçimde köle edilmesi gibi geliyordu."
Author: Jane Austen
32. "Marianne was silent; it was impossible for her to say what she did not feel, however trivial the occasion…"
Author: Jane Austen
33. "Many were the tears shed by them in their last adieus to a place so much beloved. "Dear, dear Norland!" said Marianne, as she wandered alone before the house, on the last evening of their being there; "when shall I cease to regret you!—when learn to feel a home elsewhere!—Oh! happy house, could you know what I suffer in now viewing you from this spot, from whence perhaps I may view you no more!—And you, ye well-known trees!—but you will continue the same.—No leaf will decay because we are removed, nor any branch become motionless although we can observe you no longer!—No; you will continue the same; unconscious of the pleasure or the regret you occasion, and insensible of any change in those who walk under your shade!—But who will remain to enjoy you?"
Author: Jane Austen
34. "But it was a matter of great consolation to her, that what brought evil to herself would bring good to her sister; and Elinor, on the other hand, suspecting that it would not be in her power to avoid Edward entirely, comforted herself by thinking, that though their longer stay would therefore militate against her own happiness, it would be better for Marianne than an immediate return into Devonshire."
Author: Jane Austen
35. "Cold-hearted Elinor! Oh! Worse than cold-hearted! Ashamed of being otherwise.--Marianne Dashwood"
Author: Jane Austen
36. "A woman of seven and twenty, said Marianne, after pausing a moment, can never hope to feel or inspire affection again."
Author: Jane Austen
37. "Dancing? You, Poppy?" Marianne shook her head slowly. I never thought..."Rose looked concerned. She even felt Poppy's head for fever, but Poppy shook her off."I don't know about you, Rose, but I'm done letting creatures like Under Stone and the Corley dictate my life. I enjoy dancing, and I will blasted well dance at my wedding!""Poppy! Language!"Poppy didn't answer; she just threw her arms around Christian and kissed him soundly."
Author: Jessica Day George
38. "Marianne's mouth was open in surprise, but Poppy looked murderous. She clutched her reticule as though it contained a weapon. Realizing that it probably held some very sharp knitting needles, Christian reflected that it did."
Author: Jessica Day George
39. "Even now, Dickon was upstairs, writing sonnets to his new love, while back at Seadown House, Marianne was writing 'Ella' on scraps of paper and then burning them."
Author: Jessica Day George
40. "Did you know, Marianne: how by breaking the code that day, you broke it forever? For us all?"
Author: Joyce Carol Oates
41. "Go." Granmare pointed at the door. "Let me work in peace."Balthazar didn't look back when he left."Now, my dear," the witch turned to her, "let me give you what that foolish boy paid for.""He's not foolish," Arianne said. For giving a drop of his blood, the least she could do was defend the annoying oaf. "He's going out of his way to help me, so if there's anyone foolish here it's me.""My, my, my." Granmare Baba gasped, spreading her hand at the center of her chest. "You have a mouth on you. I will so enjoy watching what happens to you when the time comes."A chill went down Arianne's back. She'd almost been afraid to ask, "What do you mean?"Granmare Baba only smiled her yellow toothy smile before she went about putting things together in a large cauldron that seemed to have magically appeared in the center of the round room."
Author: Kate Evangelista
42. "They stood absolutely still for the longest minute of Arianne's life. She barely breathed while Balthazar's eyes roamed her body. She swallowed, feeling each part of her that his gaze landed turn pink, like he was actually touching her. How was that even possible? When Arianne thought she could breathe a sigh of relief because his eyes locked with hers again, the most devilish grin she'd ever seen formed on Balthazar's lips. She inhaled sharply. When had his grin become less arrogant and more…sexy?"
Author: Kate Evangelista
43. "Your heart is not a wound to be poked at to see if the scab is ready to come off. You can be healed of that very old pain, if you'll just let it happen. (Marianne)"
Author: Laurell K. Hamilton
44. "This is not wise!" one of the Scale burbled through the wet plaster."We're making you monuments to Justice!" Annabelle shouted."You know, I think I prefer the Scale when they're plastered." Arianne laughed, betraying more than a tinge of vengeful glee.The girls kept pouring bucket after bucket-a full bucket over each of the threatening angels' heads, until their voices did not carry anymore-until the Outcasts had no need to stand over the Scale with their starshots."
Author: Lauren Kate
45. "Arianne had her feet up on the table, wearing a striped conductor's cap.Arriane was fixated on the game. A chocolate cigar bobbed between her lips as she contemplated her next move. Roland was giving Arianne the hawk eye."Checkmate, bitch," Arianne said triumphantly, knocking over Roland's king."
Author: Lauren Kate
46. "By giving words the latitude she does, (Marianne) Van Hirtum emphasizes their contagious qualities: they become almost like viruses, with which it is necessary to put oneself in harmony by sympathetic magic if one is not to be overwhelmed. ... What is essential is to become one with the sickness, that is, in the context of language as a whole, to enter into contact with words."
Author: Michael Richardson
47. "The poet Marianne Moore famously wrote of 'real toads in imaginary gardens,' and the labyrinth offers us the possibility of being real creatures in symbolic space...In such spaces as the labyrinth we cross over [between real and imaginary spaces]; we are really travelling, even if the destination is only symbolic."
Author: Rebecca Solnit
48. "Writers didn't usually draw a crowd of paparazzi. As the service progressed, however, journalists began to enter the church. When it was over, they pushed their way toward him. Gillon, Marianne, and Martin tried to run interference. One persistent gray fellow (gray suit, gray hair, gray face, gray voice) got through the crowd, shoved a tape recorder toward him, and asked the obvious questions. "I'm sorry," he replied. "I'm here for my friend's memorial service. It's not appropriate to do interviews.""You don't understand," the gray fellow said, sounding puzzled. "I'm from the Daily Telegraph. They've sent me down specially.""Gillon, I need your help," he said.Gillon leaned down toward the reporter from his immense height and said, firmly, and in his grandest accent, "Fuck off.""You can't talk to me like that," the man from the Telegraph said. "I've been to public school."
Author: Salman Rushdie

Arianne Quotes Pictures

Quotes About Arianne
Quotes About Arianne
Quotes About Arianne

Today's Quote

The dearest days in one's life are those that seem very far and very near at once."
Author: Abraham Cahan

Famous Authors

Popular Topics