Top Aston Quotes

Browse top 564 famous quotes and sayings about Aston by most favorite authors.

Favorite Aston Quotes

1. "So, preferring death to capture, I accomplished the most astonishing deeds, and which, more then once, showed me that the too great care we take of our bodies is the only obstacle to the sucess of those projects which require rapid decision, and vigorous and determined execution. In reality, when you have once devoted your life to your enterprises, you are no longer the equal of other men, or, rather, other men are no longer your equals, and whosoever has taken this resolution, feels his strength and resources doubled."
Author: Alexandre Dumas
2. "In literature as in love, we are astonished at what is chosen by others."
Author: Andre Maurois
3. "SHERLOCK HOLMES - I SUOI LIMITI1. Conoscenza della letteratura - Zero.2. Conoscenza della filosofia - Zero.3. Conoscenza dell'astronomia - Zero.4. Conoscenza della politica - Scarsa.5. Conoscenza della botanica - Variabile. Sa molte cose sulla belladonna, l'oppio e i veleni in genere. Non sa niente di giardinaggio.6. Conoscenza della geologia - Pratica, ma limitata. Distingue a colpo d'occhio un tipo di terreno da un altro. Rientrando da qualche passeggiata mi ha mostrato delle macchie di fango sui pantaloni e, in base al colore e alla consistenza, mi ha detto in quale parte di Londra se l'era fatte.7. Conoscenza della chimica - Profonda.8. Conoscenza dell'anatomia - Accurata, ma non sistematica.9. Conoscenza della letteratura scandalistica - Immensa. Sembra conoscere ogni particolare di tutti i misfatti più orrendi perpetrati in questo secolo.10. Buon violinista.11. Esperto schermidore col bastone, pugile, spadaccino.12. Ha una buona conoscenza pratica del diritto britannico."
Author: Arthur Conan Doyle
4. "Money! Would that make it better for them? Yes, it would make it easy. But no, the money wouldn't be enough… That means there must be something bigger than money… An answer came to Katie. It was so simple that a flash of astonishment that felt like a pain shot through her head. Education!"
Author: Betty Smith
5. "I could see it under the heavy moustache, was fixed and rather cruel-looking, with peculiarly sharp white teeth; these protruded over the lips, whose remarkable ruddiness showed astonishing vitality in a man of his years."
Author: Bram Stoker
6. "Al termine di una notte di luna un cane ulula e poi ammutolisce. La luce del fuoco tremola e la sentinella sbadiglia. Un uomo vecchissimo passa silenzioso davanti alle tende, e saggia il terreno con un bastone per accertarsi di non inciampare nelle corde tese. Poi prosegue. La sua gente si trasferisce in una regione più verde. Mosè si reca all'appuntamento con gli sciacalli e gli avvoltoi."
Author: Bruce Chatwin
7. "And so what? I just killed a demon in my own house, and you're going to be a dickhead about it because I'm not some spoiled-rotten rich brat like you and your sister?" Alec looked astonished. "What did you call me?"
Author: Cassandra Clare
8. "The way to do research is to attack the facts at the point of greatest astonishment."
Author: Celia Green
9. "That which is not slightly distorted lacks sensible appeal; from which it follows that irregularity – that is to say, the unexpected, surprise and astonishment, are a essential part and characteristic of beauty."
Author: Charles Baudelaire
10. "During the 1992 election I concluded as early as my first visit to New Hampshire that Bill Clinton was hateful in his behavior to women, pathological as a liar, and deeply suspect when it came to money in politics. I have never had to take any of that back, whereas if you look up what most of my profession was then writing about the beefy, unscrupulous 'New Democrat,' you will be astonished at the quantity of sheer saccharine and drool. Anyway, I kept on about it even after most Republicans had consulted the opinion polls and decided it was a losing proposition, and if you look up the transcript of the eventual Senate trial of the president—only the second impeachment hearing in American history—you will see that the last order of business is a request (voted down) by the Senate majority leader to call Carol and me as witnesses. So I can dare to say that at least I saw it through."
Author: Christopher Hitchens
11. "In truth, the only restrictions on our capacity to astonish ourselves and each other are imposed by our own minds."
Author: David Blaine
12. "Music is like girlfriends to me; I'm continually astonished by the choices other people make."
Author: David Lee Roth
13. "Panama still more extraordinary machines would work an even more astonishing success. The wonderful thing was that the American dredges did"
Author: David McCullough
14. "Depose him,' said Will Scott, astonished. ‘The Grand Master's holy office terminates with his life.' ‘And can nobody think of an answer to that?' said Will Scott."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
15. "Some of life's moments mark a break in consciousness; others give rise to streams of scintillating, philosophical ideas or astonishing works of art; still others, to important meeting or profound personal upheavals."
Author: Elie Wiesel
16. "It is at the family fireside, often under the shelter of the law itself, that the real tragedies of life are acted; in these days traitors wear gloves, scoundrels cloak themselves in public esteem, and their victims die broken-hearted, but smiling to the last. What I have just related to you is almost an every-day occurrence; and yet you profess astonishment."
Author: Émile Gaboriau
17. "Israel was thinking of warm beer, and muffins, and Wensleydale cheese, and Wallace and Gromit, and the music of Elgar, and the Clash, and the Beatles, and Jarvis Cocker, and the white cliffs of Dover, and Big Bend, and the West End, and Stonehenge, and Alton Towers, and the Last Night of the Proms, and Glastonbury, and William Hogarth, and William Blake, and Just William, and Winston Churchill, and the North Circular Road, and Grodzinski's for coffee, and rubbish, and potholes, and a slice of Stilton and a pickled onion, and George Orwell. And Gloria, of course. He was almost home to Gloria. G-L-O-R-I-A."
Author: Ian Sansom
18. "Mother Goose will show newcomers to this world how astonishing, beautiful, capricious, dancy, eccentric, funny, goluptious, haphazard, intertwingled, joyous, kindly, loving, melodious, naughty, outrageous, pomsidillious, querimonious, romantic, silly, tremendous, unexpected, vertiginous, wonderful, x-citing, yo-heave-ho-ish, and zany it is."
Author: Iona Opie
19. "Elinor looked at him with greater astonishment than ever. She began to think that he must be in liquor..."
Author: Jane Austen
20. "Elinor placed all that was astonishing in this way of acting to his mother's account; and it was happy for her that he had a mother whose character was so imperfectly known to her, as to be the general excuse for every thing strange on the part of her son."
Author: Jane Austen
21. "And although the W came along in the tenth century, modern Germans still seem to manage perfectly well by using a V instead. Except when the German managing director of Aston Martin tries to say ‘vanquish'."
Author: Jeremy Clarkson
22. "He'd been toting it, and checking it, and packing and unpacking, all the way since fate was on the river - that's how long - the Big River" - Fate Marable and his riverboat caliope (Cleo seemed to recall), who hadastonished the landings between New Orleans and St. Louis with the wild, harsh, skirling Gypsy music, and left there, echoing in the young and restless even as it dies off round the bed; to linger with them thereafter, in the pelting roar of November midnights and the clickety-clack of lonesome valley freights, until they up one night and go after it in a battered bus, following the telephone wires that make a zigzag music staff against the evening sky - some variation of that basic beginning could be told for everyone who jazz has touched and altered."
Author: John Clellon Holmes
23. "Thomas Wollaston, in the Annals and Magazine of Natural History, complained that Darwin did no seem to know what a species actually was. The British Quarterly, deliberately sitting up trouble, speculated that a time might come when a monkey could propose marriage to a genteel British lady. Perhaps cruelest of all was a cartoon in Punch magazine, depicting a gorilla with a sign on its neck. Deliberately evoking the anti-slavery tract of Darwin's Wedgwood forbears, the sign read:"Am I a Man and a Brother?"
Author: Jonathan Clements
24. "When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies in me; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion; when I see the tombs of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow; when I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind. When I read the several dates of the tombs, of some that died yesterday, and some six hundred years ago, I consider that great Day when we shall all of us be contemporaries, and make our appearance together"
Author: Joseph Addison
25. "The Doctor snorted. 'Wimp!' He squared his shoulders and turned towards the fire, grinning. 'Race you.' And he was off, running. Jack hesitated, sighed, swore, and ran after him. Levin and Krylek, Catherine and the villagers stared after them in astonishment. Two dark figures running though fire..."
Author: Justin Richards
26. "Haunting the library as a kid, reading poetry books when I was not reading bird books, I had been astonished at how often birds were mentioned in British poetry. Songsters like nightingales and Sky Larks appeared in literally dozens of works, going back beyond Shakespeare, back beyond Chaucer. Entire poems dedicated to such birds were written by Tennyson, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, and many lesser-known poets. I had run across half a dozen British poems just about Sky Larks; Thomas Hardy had even written a poem about Shelley's poem about the Sky Lark. The love of birds and of the English language were intermingled in British literary history.Somehow we Americans had failed to import this English love of birds along with the language, except in diluted form. But we had imported a few of the English birds themselves — along with birds from practically everywhere else."
Author: Kenn Kaufman
27. "I groaned,holding my stomach. "Easton Heights never covered this.Cue dramatic voice-over: 'On the next all-new episode: Halloween gone dangerously wrong. Carys consumes lethal amounts of sugar. Will she live to see Homecoming? And,more terrifying,Will anyone ask her now that she's gained three pounds?'"Arianna frowned as she pinned my wig into place. "No one made you eat an entire bag of Tootsie Rolls."
Author: Kiersten White
28. "And then Holt, the Queen's Guard, placed his maps on the desk, neatly so they would not fall, tipped Thiel over one shoulder, tipped Death over the other, and stood under his load. In the astonished silence that followed, Holt lumbered toward Runnemood, who, understanding, let out a snort and stalked from the room of his own accord. Then Holt carried his outraged burdens away on either shoulder, just as they got their voices back. Bitterblue could hear them screaming their indignation all the way down the stairs."
Author: Kristin Cashore
29. "Thea! I was looking for you."It was Eric's voice. Warm, eager-everything that Thea wasn't. She turned to see green eyes flecked with dancing gray and an astonishing smile. A smile that drew her in, changing the world.Maybe everything was going to be all right, after all."
Author: L.J. Smith
30. "The uniformity of the earth's life, more astonishing than its diversity, is accountable by the high probability that we derived, originally, from some single cell, fertilized in a bolt of lightning as the earth cooled. It is from the progeny of this parent cell that we take our looks; we still share genes around, and the resemblance of the enzymes of grasses to those of whales is a family resemblance."
Author: Lewis Thomas
31. "It is the rank and file - the average woman - for whom the world has opened up so astonishingly."
Author: Mary Augusta Ward
32. "Of course I didn't think I'd heard him correctly. Why would he have told me something so important now, so casually, in the middle of a street fair?Before I could stop myself, I blurted out the first thing I thought."Just one?"The look he gave me was shattering.Given everything I knew about him, though, I'd expected him to have killed a man.It was the fact that his having taken a single life had resulted in his banishment to the Underworld for all eternity that I found so astonishing."I had no idea," he said, with a dry smile, "that you were so bloodthirsty, Pierce. Should we try to find you one of those pirate costumes?"
Author: Meg Cabot
33. "Camels can go many weeks without drinking anything at all. The notion that they cache water in their humps is pure myth—their humps are made of fat, and water is stored in their body tissues. While other mammals draw water from bloodstreams when faced with dehydration, leading to death by volume shock, camels tap the water in their tissues, keeping their blood volume stable. Though this reduces the camel's bulk, they can lose up to a third of their body weight with no ill effects, which they can replace astonishingly quickly, as they are able to drink up to forty gallons in a single watering." (pp.69-70)"
Author: Michael Benanav
34. "I am frequently astonished that it so often results in correct predictions of experimental results."
Author: Murray Gell Mann
35. "Many have never risked losing the normalcy of their daily existence to gain the astonishing experience of having to see God come through or die."
Author: Murray Pura
36. "It was the drawing that led me to architecture, the search for light and astonishing forms."
Author: Oscar Niemeyer
37. "I prayed hard and only gradually became aware that this fierce praying was a way of finding prologue and entrance into my own writing. This came as both astonishment and relief. When I thought God had abandoned me, I discovered that He had simply given me a different voice to praise the inexhaustible beauty of the made world."
Author: Pat Conroy
38. "Bret Easton Ellis is a social satirist; I consider myself aligned with how he does things. Bret doesn't write about that which he loves about the world, he writes about what disgusts him. You'd be a disturbed individual if you came out and said, 'I love these characters'."
Author: Roger Avary
39. "But, astonishingly, I'm not broken. I'm not destroyed. Terrified witless, shaking, retching with fear, yes. But no longer insecure. Because during my search for how you died, I somehow found myself to be a different person. ... Living my life. And it wouldn't be my grief for you that toppled the mountain, but love."
Author: Rosamund Lupton
40. "Interviewer: The other day, when we first talked, you said that you felt that, when you were writing, you were often following invisible patterns.Stone: I don't see them so much as hear them, and I know that a poem will happen and later I will look at it, and say: Wow, where did that come from? how did I do that? I didn't set out to do that, but the neural connections are so fast, the body, the self is so slow, (laughs) that you're kind of astonished. It's odd."
Author: Ruth Stone
41. "For men, I think, love is a thing formed of equal parts lust and astonishment. The astonishment part women understand. The lust part they only think they understand."
Author: Stephen King
42. "At forty-two, I had never done anything that took my own breath away, and I suppose now that was part of the problem--my chronic inability to astonish myself. I promise you, no one judges me more harshly than I do myself; I caused a brilliant wreckage. Some say I fell from grace; they're being kind. I didn't fall. I dove."
Author: Sue Monk Kidd
43. "I marvel at how good I was before I met him, how I lived molded to the smallest space possible, my days the size of little beads that passed without passion through my fingers. So few people know what they're capable of. At forty-two I'd never done anything that took my own breath away, and I suppose now that was part of the problem - my chronic inability to astonish myself."
Author: Sue Monk Kidd
44. "ASTONISHING, said Death. REALLY ASTONISHING. LET ME PUT FORWARD ANOTHER SUGGESTION: THAT YOU ARE NOTHING MORE THAN A LUCKY SPECIES OF APE THAT IS TRYING TO UNDERSTAND THE COMPLEXITIES OF CREATION VIA A LANGUAGE THAT EVOLVED IN ORDER TO TELL ONE ANOTHER WHERE THE RIPE FRUIT WAS."
Author: Terry Pratchett
45. "Astonishing. In the morning, when she sat working at that table of correspondence, silhouetted by sunlight . . . Her hair truly did look like an octopus. It was the way she wore it, he thought. Or maybe the way it wore her. It all sat perched atop her head in that big, inky blob. And no matter how strenuously she pinned it, dark, heavy curls worked loose on all sides, like tentacles. Of course, it was an entrancing, strangely erotic octopus. Ransom worried this might be how fetishes developed."
Author: Tessa Dare
46. "On an evening in the latter part of May a middle-aged man was walking homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining Vale of Blakemore, or Blackmoor. The pair of legs that carried him were rickety, and there was a bias in his gait which inclined him somewhat to the left of a straight line. He occasionally gave a smart nod, as if in confirmation of some opinion, though he was not thinking of anything in particular. An empty egg-basket was slung upon his arm, the nap of his hat was ruffled, a patch being quite worn away at its brim where his thumb came in taking it off. Presently he was met by an elderly parson astride on a gray mare, who, as he rode, hummed a wandering tune."
Author: Thomas Hardy
47. "I met Zach's wife today.""Ah, the once and future Mrs. Easton. What did you think of her?""I think he'll go back to her."Søren nodded. "That was inevitable."Nora swallowed. "And last night meant nothing.""I'm sure your night together meant a great deal to him. More than you may ever know. The same wind that blows us off course can turn and carry us home.""She is his home. I could see that in her eyes. She's perfect, Søren.""Perfect for him perhaps. To me, Eleanor, it is you who is flawless."Nora's heart beat heavy in her chest. Søren's love never ceased to humble her."I'm as flawed as it gets.""You are human. And that is the better part of your beauty. But you always knew your editor longed for his wife more than anything. This can't be a surprise to you. What else?"
Author: Tiffany Reisz
48. "He walked on down the dark, empty street. Suddenly an idea came to him. Immediately, with his whole being, he knew it was true. He had glimpsed a new and improbable explanation for the atomic phenomena that up until now had seemed so hopelessly inexplicable; abysses had suddenly changed into bridges. What clarity and simplicity! This idea was astonishingly graceful and beautiful. It seemed to have given birth to itself – like a white water-lily appearing out of the calm darkness of a lake. He gasped, reveling in its beauty…And how strange, he thought suddenly, that this idea should have come to him when his mind was far away from anything to do with science, when the discussions that so excited him were those of free men, when his words and the words of his friends had been determined only by freedom, by bitter freedom."
Author: Vasily Grossman
49. "... David began to argue, with the whining intonations of German astonishment, (...) that everyone did it."
Author: Vladimir Nabokov
50. "And I may not omit here a special work of God's providence. There was a proud and very profane young man [aboard the Mayflower], one of the seamen, of a lusty, able body, which made him the more haughty; he would always be contemning the poor people in their [sea]sickness, and cursing them daily with grievous execrations, and did not let to tell them, that he hoped to help cast half of them overboard before they came to their journey's end, and to make merry with what they had; and if he were by any gently reproved, he would curse and swear most bitterly.But it pleased God before they came half seas over, to smite this young man with a grievous disease, of which he died in a desperate manner, and so was himself the first that was thrown overboard. Thus his curses light on his own head; and it was an astonishment to all his fellows, for they noted it to be the just hand of God upon him."
Author: William Bradford

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Author: Antonin Scalia

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