Top Doth Quotes

Browse top 245 famous quotes and sayings about Doth by most favorite authors.

Favorite Doth Quotes

1. "My depth of purse is not so greatNor yet my bibliophilic greed,That merely buying doth elate:The books I buy I like to read:Still e'en when dawdling in a mead,Beneath a cloudless summer sky,By bank of Thames, or Tyne, or Tweed,The books I read — I like to buy."
Author: A. Edward Newton
2. "It is not growing like a treeIn bulk, doth make Man better be;Or standing long an oak, three hundred year,To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere:A lily of a dayIs fairer far in MayAlthough it fall and die that night;It was the plant and flower of Light.In small proportions we just beauties see;And in short measures life may perfect be (Ben Jonson)"
Author: Aidan Chambers
3. "Ah, sweet Content, where doth thine harbour hold."
Author: Barnabe Barnes
4. "Love, that exempts no one beloved from loving, seized me with pleasure of this man so strongly, that, as thou seest, it doth not yet desert me."
Author: Dante Alighieri
5. "My Lord, I find thy face apelike and thy form misshapen. Thy beard, moreover, is an offense against decency, resembling more closely the scabrous fir which doth decorate the hinder portion of a mongrel dog than a proper adornement for a human face. Is it possible that thy mother, seized by some wild lechery, did dally at some time past with a randy goat? -Mandorallen"
Author: David Eddings
6. "Patience means accepting that which cannot be changed and facing it with courage, grace, and faith. It means being "willing to submit to all things which the Lord seeth fit to inflict upon [us], even as a child doth submit to his father." Ultimately, patience means being "firm and steadfast, and immovable in keeping the commandments of the Lord" every hour of every day, even when it is hard to do so. In the words of John the Revelator, "Here is the patience of the saints: here are they that keep the commandments of God, and … faith [in] Jesus."
Author: Dieter F. Uchtdorf
7. "For whatsoever from one place doth fall, Is with the tide unto an other brought: For there is nothing lost, that may be found, if sought."
Author: Edmund Spenser
8. "Men call you fayre, and you doe credit it,For that your self ye daily such doe see:But the trew fayre, that is the gentle wit,And vertuous mind, is much more praysd of me.For all the rest, how ever fayre it be,Shall turne to nought and loose that glorious hew:But onely that is permanent and freeFrom frayle corruption, that doth flesh ensew.That is true beautie: that doth argue youTo be divine and borne of heavenly seed:Deriv'd from that fayre Spirit, from whom al trueAnd perfect beauty did at first proceed.He onely fayre, and what he fayre hath made,All other fayre lyke flowres untymely fade."
Author: Edmund Spenser
9. "He who doth not smoke hath either known no great griefs, or refuseth himself the softest consolation, next to that which comes from heaven."
Author: Edward Bulwer Lytton
10. "The heart doth recognise thee,Alone, alone! The heart doth smell thee sweet,Doth view thee fair, doth judge thee most complete,—-Though seeing now those changes that disguise thee."
Author: Elizabeth Barrett Browning
11. "I grieve and dare not show my discontent, I love and yet am forced to seem to hate,I do, yet dare not say I ever meant, I seem stark mute but inwardly do prate. I am and not, I freeze and yet am burned, Since from myself another self I turned. My care is like my shadow in the sun, Follows me flying, flies when I pursue it, Stands and lies by me, doth what I have done."
Author: Elizabeth I Tudor
12. "Even as the Sun doth not wait for prayers and incantations torise, but shines forth and is welcomed by all: so thou also waitnot for clapping of hands and shouts and praise to do thy duty;nay, do good of thine own accord, and thou wilt be loved like theSun."
Author: Epictetus
13. "What mortal claims, by searching to the utmost limit, to have found out the nature of God, or of his opposite, or of that which comes between, seeing as he doth this world of man tossed to and fro by waves of contradiction and strange vicissitudes?"
Author: Euripides
14. "But it is not only the difficulty and labor which men take in finding out of truth, nor again that when it is found it imposeth upon men's thoughts, that doth bring lies in favor; but a natural though corrupt love of the lie itself."
Author: Francis Bacon
15. "And to Rhaego son of Drogo, the stallion who will mount the world, to him I also pledge a gift. To him I will give this iron chair his mother's father sat in. I will give him Seven Kingdoms. I, Drogo, khal, will do this thing.'' His voice rose, and he lifted his fist in the sky. ''I will take my khalasar west to where the world ends, and ride the wooden horses across the black salt water as no khal has done before. I will kill the men in the iron suits and tear down their stone houses. I will rape their women, take their children as slaves, and bring their broken gods back to Vaes Dothrak to bow down beneath the Mother of Mountains. This I vow, I, Drogo son of Bharbo. This I swear before the Mother of Mountains, as the stars look down in witness."
Author: George R.R. Martin
16. "See, the night doth enfold us! See, all the world lies sleeping!"
Author: Giacomo Puccini
17. "On Ponkawtasset, since, we took our way,Down this still stream we took our meadowy way,A poet wise has settled, whose fine rayDoth faintly shine on Concord's twilight day.Like those first stars, whose silver beams on high,Shining more brightly as the day goes by,Most travellers cannot at first descry,But eyes that wont to range the evening sky,And know celestial lights, do plainly see,And gladly hail them, numbering two or three;For lore that's deep must deeply studied be,As from deep wells men read star-poetry.These stars are never pal'd, though out of sight,But like the sun they shine forever bright;Aye, they are suns, though earth must in its flightPut out its eyes that it may see their light.Who would neglect the least celestial sound,Or faintest light that falls on earthly ground,If he could know it one day would be foundThat star in Cygnus whither we are bound,And pale our sun with heavenly radiance round?"
Author: Henry David Thoreau
18. "This Force, by troth, I'll never comprehend!It doth control and also doth obey? And 'tis within and yet it is beyond,'Tis both inside and yet outside one's self?What paradox! What fickle-natur'd pow'r!Aye: frailty, thy name-- belike--is Force."
Author: Ian Doescher
19. "Justice is not Healing. Healing cometh only by suffering and patience, and maketh no demand, not even for Justice. Justice worketh only within the bonds of things as they are... and therefore though Justice is itself good and desireth no further evil, it can but perpetuate the evil that was, and doth not prevent it from the bearing of fruit in sorrow."
Author: J.R.R. Tolkien
20. "The law, instead of cleansing the heart from sin, doth revive it, put strength into, and increase it in the soul, even as it doth discover and forbid it, for it doth not give power to subdue."
Author: John Bunyan
21. "Converse with men makes sharp the glittering wit, but God to man doth speak in solitude."
Author: John Stuart Blackie
22. "You might be surprised to know that gratitude is a commandment of the Father. ‘Thou shalt thank the Lord thy God in all things' (D&C 59:7), the Lord has commanded in these latter days. Even further, He has admonished that ‘in nothing doth man offend God, or against none is his wrath kindled, save those who confess not his hand in all things, and obey not his commandments' (D&C 59:21)."
Author: Joseph B. Wirthlin
23. "GOD DOESN'T HATE FAGS ORANYBODY ELSE FOR THAT MATTER.GOD SAVES! THEN, GOD PASSES ITTO GRETZKY - WHO ROOFS THATSHIT, TOP-SHELF! THEN GOD ANDGRETZKY HIGH FIVE & BELLY-BUMP,CELEBRATING THEIR HOCKEYPROWESS. AND NEVER ONCE DOTHEY GIVE A SHIT IF ANYBODY'SGAY OR NOT."
Author: Kevin Smith
24. "I came to believe it not true that "the coward dies a thousand deaths, the brave man only one." I think it is the other way around: It is the brave who die a thousand deaths.For it is imagination, and not just conscience, which doth make cowards of us all. Those who do not know fear are not truly brave."
Author: Leo Rosten
25. "As we drew near to the gates of Dother Hall the old bell in the belfry rang out. I said, 'I must go in, it's nigh on ten of the clock.' He half-turned away from me, his jacket collar hiding his expression. Was he angry? Disappointed?"Jo looked intently and I said, "Hungry?"Jo ignored me, but as she passed by acting out walking away from Phil, she allowed her hand to slap against my head."
Author: Louise Rennison
26. "Loneliness of heartIn the still of the night my heart doth cry out, who can hear it for time is far spent. In the darkness in the shadow of the depth I find isolation and fear..."
Author: M.I. Ghostwriter
27. "--Seek far from noise and day some western cave, Where woods and streams with soft and pausing winds A lulling murmur weave?— [_30 Ianthe] doth not sleep The dreamless sleep of death:-Shelley, Percy Bysshe (2011-03-24). The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley — Complete (Kindle Locations 317-319). . Kindle Edition."
Author: Percy Bysshe Shelley
28. "I now have learn'd Love right, and learn'd even so,As who by being poisoned doth poison know."
Author: Philip Sidney
29. "I myself, however, could never resist the temptation to read raisin paste for wine in the story of the Miracle of Cana. "When the ruler of the feast had tasted the water that was made raisin paste ... he said unto the bridegroom, 'Every man doth at the beginning doth set forth good raisin paste, and when men have well drunk [eaten? the text is no doubt corrupt], then that which is worse, but thou hast kept the good raisin paste until now."
Author: Robert Farrar Capon
30. "The intelligible forms of ancient poets,The fair humanities of old religion,The Power, the Beauty, and the MajestyThat had their haunts in dale or piny mountain,Or forest, by slow stream, or pebbly spring,Or chasms and watery depths; all these have vanished;They live no longer in the faith of reason;But still the heart doth need a language; stillDoth the old instinct bring back the old names;Spirits or gods that used to share this earthWith man as with their friend; and at this day'Tis Jupiter who brings whate'er is great,And Venus who brings every thing that's fair."
Author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
31. "Marriage is a legal contract -- it's not a sacred thing. ~Celaena Sardothien"
Author: Sarah J. Maas
32. "I do believe you think what now you speak,But what we do determine oft we break.Purpose is but the slave to memory,Of violent birth, but poor validity,Which now, like fruit unripe, sticks on the tree,But fall, unshaken, when they mellow be.Most necessary 'tis that we forgetTo pay ourselves what to ourselves is debt.What to ourselves in passion we propose,The passion ending, doth the purpose lose."
Author: Shakesphere
33. "But where, says some, is the King of America? I'll tell you. Friend, he reigns above, and doth not make havoc of mankind like the Royal Brute of Britain."
Author: Thomas Paine
34. "Shakespeare in the park? Doth mother know you weareth her drapes?"
Author: Tony Stark
35. "The deepest rivers make least din, The silent soule doth most abound in care."
Author: William Alexander
36. "That time of year thou mayst in me beholdWhen yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hangUpon those boughs which shake against the cold,Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.In me thou seest the twilight of such dayAs after sunset fadeth in the west,Which by and by black night doth take away,Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.In me thou see'st the glowing of such fireThat on the ashes of his youth doth lie,As the death-bed whereon it must expireConsumed with that which it was nourish'd by.This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,To love that well which thou must leave ere long."
Author: William Shakespeare
37. "By the sweet power of music: therefore the poet did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones and floods; since nought so stockish, hard and full of rage, but music for the time doth change his nature. The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils; The motions of his spirit are dull as night and his affections dark as Erebus: Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music."
Author: William Shakespeare
38. "From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life,Whose misadventured piteous overthrows Doth with their death bury their parents' strife. . . . O, I am fortune's fool! . . . Then I defy you, stars."
Author: William Shakespeare
39. "Bloody thou art, bloody will be thy end;Shame serves thy life and doth thy death attend."
Author: William Shakespeare
40. "O! she doth teach the torches to burn bright It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear; Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.- Romeo -"
Author: William Shakespeare
41. "Doubt thou the stars are fire;Doubt that the sun doth move;Doubt truth to be a liar;But never doubt I love."
Author: William Shakespeare
42. "The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, doth glance from heaven to Earth, from Earth to heaven; and as imagination bodies forth the forms of things unknown, the poet's pen turns them to shape, and gives to airy nothing a local habitation and a name; such tricks hath strong imagination."
Author: William Shakespeare
43. "Oh, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!It seems she hangs upon the cheek of nightLike a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear,Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.So shows a snowy dove trooping with crowsAs yonder lady o'er her fellows shows.The measure done, I'll watch her place of stand,And, touching hers, make blessèd my rude hand.Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.*Oh, she shows the torches how to burn bright! She stands out against the darkness like a jeweled earring hanging against the cheek of an African. Her beauty is too good for this world; she's too beautiful to die and be buried. She outshines the other women like a white dove in the middle of a flock of crows. When this dance is over, I'll see where she stands, and then I'll touch her hand with my rough and ugly one. Did my heart ever love anyone before this moment? My eyes were liars, then, because I never saw true beauty before tonight.*"
Author: William Shakespeare
44. "Suppose the ambassador from the French comes back:Tells Harry that the King doth offer him Katherine his daughter;and with her to dowry some petty and unprofitable dukedoms:The offer likes not;"
Author: William Shakespeare
45. "How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!Here will we sit and let the sounds of musicCreep in our ears: soft stillness and the nightBecome the touches of sweet harmony.Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heavenIs thick inlaid with patines of bright gold:There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'stBut in his motion like an angel sings,Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins;Such harmony is in immortal souls;But whilst this muddy vesture of decayDoth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it."- Lorenzo, Acte V, Scene 1"
Author: William Shakespeare
46. "What is in that word "honor"? What is that "honor"? Air. A trim reckoning. Who hath it? He that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it? No. Doth he hear it? No. 'Tis insensible, then? Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? No. Why? Detraction will not suffer it. Therefore, I'll none of it. Honor is a mere scutcheon. And so ends my catechism."
Author: William Shakespeare
47. "Saint Hellion is the awesomest band the world doth know."
Author: William Shakespeare
48. "TIMON Commend me to them,And tell them that, to ease them of their griefs,Their fears of hostile strokes, their aches, losses,Their pangs of love, with other incident throesThat nature's fragile vessel doth sustainIn life's uncertain voyage, I will some kindness do them:I'll teach them to prevent wild Alcibiades' wrath.First Senator I like this well; he will return again.TIMON I have a tree, which grows here in my close,That mine own use invites me to cut down,And shortly must I fell it: tell my friends,Tell Athens, in the sequence of degreeFrom high to low throughout, that whoso pleaseTo stop affliction, let him take his haste,Come hither, ere my tree hath felt the axe,And hang himself. I pray you, do my greeting."
Author: William Shakespeare
49. "The wine-cup is the little silver well, Where truth, if truth there beDoth dwell."
Author: William Shakespeare
50. "The Brightness of her cheek would shame those stars as daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven would through the airy region stream so bright that birds would sing, and think it were not night."
Author: William Shakespeare

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In order to deal with the fear of annihilation you have to face annihilation again and again and again. It's not enough just to understand this intellectually. It's not enough just to read about this. You need to watch yourself being annihilated right now. If you can manage to sit quietly as you disappear from existence moment by moment, then you can see it's really nothing to be afraid of. You gotta meditate. Nobody likes to hear that. But it's true."
Author: Brad Warner

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