Top Dublin Quotes

Browse top 45 famous quotes and sayings about Dublin by most favorite authors.

Favorite Dublin Quotes

1. "The physician had asked the patient to read aloud a paragraph from the statutes of Trinity College, Dublin. ‘It shall be in the power of the College to examine or not examine every Licentiate, previous to his admission to a fellowship, as they shall think fit.' What the patient actually read was: ‘An the bee-what in the tee-mother of the trothodoodoo, to majoram or that emidrate, eni eni krastei, mestreit to ketra totombreidei, to ra from treido a that kekritest.' Marvellous! Philip said to himself as he copied down the last word. What style! What majestic beauty! The richness and sonority of the opening phrase! ‘An the bee-what in the tee-mother of the trothodoodoo.' He repeated it to himself. ‘I shall print it on the title page of my next novel,' he wrote in his notebook."
Author: Aldous Huxley
2. "It's still possible to find pockets of old Dublin - but its becoming more and more rarified."
Author: Anjelica Huston
3. "250,000 people turned up in Dublin to cheer me on an open-topped bus along O'Connell St after my world title winning fight in 1985. I'll never forget the sea of smiling faces that greeted me that day."
Author: Barry McGuigan
4. "Fabulous place, Dublin is. The trouble is, you work hard and in Dublin you play hard as well."
Author: Bonnie Tyler
5. "I love it here in Boston and I love studying medicine. Butit's not home. Dublin is home. Being back with you felt like home. I miss mybest friend.I've met some great guys here, but I didn't grow up with any of themplaying cops and robbers in my back garden. I don't feel like they are realfriends. I haven't kicked them in the shins, stayed up all night on Santawatch with them, hung from trees pretending to be monkeys, played hotel,or laughed my heart out as their stomachs were pumped. It's kind of hard tobeat that."
Author: Cecelia Ahern
6. "(CBI lecture, Dublin, 2008. Speaking on the challenges presented by The Moorehawke Trilogy to the YA reader)You can't choose any of these characters and say, 'Yes! I'm completely on your side. You are the good guy! You are the one I agree with.' Because at some stage along the way every single one of these characters will let you down. They may not want to. They may have no choice. But they will let you down."
Author: Celine Kiernan
7. "Dans l'automne de l'année 1816, John Melmoth, élève du collège de la Trinité, à Dublin, suspendit momentanément ses études pour visiter un oncle mourant, et de qui dépendaient toutes ses espérances de fortune. John, qui avait perdu ses parents, était le fils d'un cadet de famille, dont la fortune médiocre suffisait à peine pour payer les frais de son éducation ; mais son oncle était vieux, célibataire et riche. Depuis sa plus tendre enfance, John avait appris, de tous ceux qui l'entouraient, à regarder cet oncle avec ce sentiment qui attire et repousse à la fois, ce respect mêlé du désir de plaire, que l'on éprouve pour l'être qui tient en quelque sorte en ses mains le fil de notre existence."
Author: Charles Robert Maturin
8. "When I come home, I say I'm coming home to Dublin. When I'm in Dublin, I say I'm going home to New York. I'm sort of a man of two countries."
Author: Colum McCann
9. "So they were pen pals now, Emma composing long, intense letters crammed with jokes and underlining, forced banter and barely concealed longing; two-thousand-word acts of love on air-mail paper. Letters, like compilation tapes, were really vehicles for unexpressed emotions and she was clearly putting far too much time and energy into them. In return, Dexter sent her postcards with insufficient postage: ‘Amsterdam is MAD', ‘Barcelona INSANE', ‘Dublin ROCKS. Sick as DOG this morning.' As a travel writer, he was no Bruce Chatwin, but still she would slip the postcards in the pocket of a heavy coat on long soulful walks on Ilkley Moor, searching for some hidden meaning in ‘VENICE COMPLETELY FLOODED!!!!"
Author: David Nicholls
10. "Come on. I know you're not a stupid man.''I'm quite stupid. Ask anyone.''Finbar, are there superheroes living among us?' Finbar snorted with laughter and Kenny started to feel a little thick. 'Superheroes? In tights and capes, flying around? If there were superheroes, Mr. Journalist, don't you think they'd be in New York or somewhere like that? There's not that many tall buildings for Spiderman to swing from in Dublin, you know? He'd have maybe two good swings and then hang there looking disappointed.' 'These people don't wear tights and capes, Finbar.''So they're naked superheroes? That's grand for now, but when the good weather is over they're going to regret it.''They look like us. They dress like us. But they're not like us. They're different.''You,' Finbar said. 'Are sounding very racist right now."
Author: Derek Landy
11. "For me, it's all about The Dubliners by James Joyce. I love The Dead."
Author: Evan Dando
12. "For a startling period of my life, I reported the Troubles in Ireland for the BBC. I lived in Dublin and was called out to all sorts of incidents that, if taken together, add up to a war - bombings, assassinations, riots, shootings, robberies, jailbreaks, kidnappings, and sieges."
Author: Frank Delaney
13. "If a woman can by careful selection of a father, and nourishment of herself produce a citizen with efficient senses, sound organs and a good digestion, she should clearly be secured a sufficient reward for that natural service to make her willing to undertake and repeat it. Whether she be financed in the undertaking by herself, or by the father, of by a speculative capitalist, or by a new department of , say, the Royal Dublin Society, or (as at present) by the War Office maintaining her ‘on the strength' and authority under a by-law directing that women may under certain circumstances have a year's leave of absence on full salary, or by the central government, does not matter provided the results be satisfactory."
Author: George Bernard Shaw
14. "The Good Friday Agreement and the basic rights and entitlements of citizens that are enshrined within it must be defended and actively promoted by London and Dublin."
Author: Gerry Adams
15. "I came to Ireland 20 years ago as a student, hitch-hiking round for a week and staying in Dublin."
Author: Greta Scacchi
16. "But one of the most fantastic things about Ireland and Dublin is that the pubs are like Paris and the cafe culture. And Dublin, in many ways, is a pub culture."
Author: Hugh Dancy
17. "When I die, Dublin will be written on my heart."
Author: James Joyce
18. "His sensitive nature was still smarting under the lashes of an undivided and squalid way of life. His soul was still disquieted and cast down by the dull phenomenon of Dublin. He had emerged from a two years' spell of revery to find himself in the midst of a new scene, every event and figure of which affected him intimately, disheartened him or allured and, whether alluring or disheartening, filled him always with unrest and bitter thoughts. All the leisure which his school life left him was passed in the company of subversive writers whose jibes and violence of speech set up a ferment in his brain before they passed out of it into his crude writings."
Author: James Joyce
19. "Good puzzle would be cross Dublin without passing a pub."
Author: James Joyce
20. "Food in Dublin has gotten immeasurably better than it was. When I was a kid, there weren't a lot of options. Now you're overwhelmed with options."
Author: James Vincent McMorrow
21. "It's not easy making a living as a writer, and for many years I worked at a Waterstones in Dublin. It was a good environment for an aspiring writer, with lots of events and authors appearing."
Author: John Boyne
22. "...I live in Ireland every day in a drizzly dream of a Dublin walk..."
Author: John Geddes
23. "I didn't say, You are such a stuffy asshole. And he didn't say, If you ever burn one of my quarter-of-a-million dollar rugs again I'll take it out of your hide, and I didn't say, Oh, honey, wouldn't you like to? And he didn't say Grow up, Ms. Lane, I don't take little girls to my bed, and I didn't say I wouldn't go there if it was the only safe place from the Lord Master in all of Dublin."
Author: Karen Marie Moning
24. "My city. I pondered that phrase, wondered why Barrons felt that way. He never said "our world." He always said "your world." But he called Dublin his city. Merely because he'd been in it so long? Or had Barrons, like me, been beguiled by her tawdry grace, fallen for her charm and colorful dualities?I looked around "my" bookstore. That was what I called it. Did we call the things of our heart our own, whether they were or not?"
Author: Karen Marie Moning
25. "There are more balls in twenty feet of street here then there are in all of Dublin, and I'm proud to be swaying in the nut sack."
Author: Karen Marie Moning
26. "Barrons' lips twitched. I'd almost made him smile. Barrons smiles about as often as the sun comes out in Dublin, and it has the same effect on me; makes me feel warm and stupid."
Author: Karen Marie Moning
27. "He doesn't get that I'm not interested in a superhero boyfriend. I'm going to be the superhero that can kick his ass from one end of Dublin to the other."
Author: Karen Marie Moning
28. "Dublin people think they are the center of the world and the center of Ireland. And they don't realize that people have to leave Ireland to get work, and they look down on people who do."
Author: Martin McDonagh
29. "I sure love Ireland. The first trip I ever made was last year when I did this record in Dublin."
Author: Michael W. Smith
30. "Night fell clean and cold in Dublin, and wind moaned beyond my room as if a million pipes played the air."
Author: Patricia Cornwell
31. "For it is a mad world and it will get madder if we allow the minorities, be they dwarf or giant, orangutan or dolphin, nuclear-head or water conservationalist, pro-computerologist or Neo-Luddite, simpleton or sage, to interfere with aesthetics. The real world is the playing ground for each and every group, to make or unmake laws. But the tip of the nose of my book or stories or poems is where their rights end and my territorial imperatives begin, run and rule. If Mormons do not like my plays, let them write their own. If the Irish hate my Dublin stories, let them rent typewriters. If teachers and grammar school editors find my jawbreaker sentences shatter their mushmilk teeth, let them eat stale cake dunked in weak tea of their own ungodly manufacture. If the Chicano intellectuals which to re-cut my "Wonderful Ice Cream Suit" so it shapes "Zoot," may the belt unravel and the pants fall."
Author: Ray Bradbury
32. "Sometime later, I stood watching the cold rain fall, when suddenly I felt Daemon's arms around me and his lips on my neck. He loved my pregnant body and his hands roamed over it under the warm terrycloth of my bathrobe. I was lost in the moment, content to stay here forever...lost in the cold rain and welcoming warmth of Dublin, and lost in the arms of my husband. Since we arrived early this morning we were in our room, making love and sleeping, lost in a fairy tale moment, savoring every caress."
Author: Rebecca Boucher
33. "Belgrade has kind of a Dublinesque, dear-dirty charm."
Author: Rian Johnson
34. "I was happy in Dublin because it is very cosmopolitan."
Author: Rick Allen
35. "As a kid growing up in the back streets of Dublin I used to pretend I was playing in the World Cup with my mates out on the streets, and now I will be doing it for real."
Author: Robbie Keane
36. "I'm not recognised that much. I'm just a bald man in glasses and there's a rash of them in Dublin. It'd be different if I had a mohican."
Author: Roddy Doyle
37. "It's a big con job. We have sold the myth of Dublin as a sexy place incredibly well; because it is a dreary little dump most of the time."
Author: Roddy Doyle
38. "I go off into Dublin and two days later I'm spotted walking by the Liffey with a whole bunch of new friends."
Author: Ron Wood
39. "Dublin university contains the cream of Ireland: Rich and thick."
Author: Samuel Beckett
40. "I don't think I recognize you, sir, said Camier.I am Watt, said Watt. As you say, I'm unrecognizable.Watt? said Camier. The name means nothing to me.I am not widely know, said Watt, true, but I shall be, one day. Not universally, perhaps, my notoriety is not likely ever to penetrate to the denizens of Dublin's fair city, or of Cuq-Toulza."
Author: Samuel Beckett
41. "This tired abstract anger; inarticulate passive opposition; always the same thing in dublin"
Author: Samuel Beckett
42. "In 'Open City,' there is a passage that any reader of Joyce will immediately recognise as a very close, formal analogue of one the stories in 'Dubliners.' That is because a novel is also a literary conversation."
Author: Teju Cole
43. "What we consume now is not objects or events, but our experience of them. Just as we never need to leave our cars, so we never need to leave our own skulls. The experience is already out there, as ready-made as a pizza, as bluntly objective as a boulder, and all we need to do is receive it. It is as though there is an experience hanging in the air, waiting for a human subject to come alone and have it. Niagara Falls, Dublin Castle and the Great Wall of China do our experiencing for us. They come ready-interpreted, thus saving us a lot of inconvenient labour. What matters is not the place itself but the act of consuming it. We buy an experience like we pick up a T-shirt."
Author: Terry Eagleton
44. "I never asked Tolstoy to write for me, a little colored girl in Lorain, Ohio. I never asked [James] Joyce not to mention Catholicism or the world of Dublin. Never. And I don't know why I should be asked to explain your life to you. We have splendid writers to do that, but I am not one of them. It is that business of being universal, a word hopelessly stripped of meaning for me. Faulkner wrote what I suppose could be called regional literature and had it published all over the world. That's what I wish to do. If I tried to write a universal novel, it would be water. Behind this question is the suggestion that to write for black people is somehow to diminish the writing. From my perspective there are only black people. When I say 'people,' that's what I mean."
Author: Toni Morrison
45. "I always went to Ireland as a child. I remember trips to Dundalk, Wexford, Cork and Dublin. My gran was born in Dublin, and we had a lot of Irish friends, so we'd stay on their farms and go fishing. They were fantastic holidays - being outdoors all day and coming home to a really warm welcome in the evenings."
Author: Vinnie Jones

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Do what you feel compelled to do and follow in the direction that your heart feels pulled.Whatever your calling is, FIND IT."
Author: Bambi Dean

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