Top Emilia In Othello Quotes

Browse top 14 famous quotes and sayings about Emilia In Othello by most favorite authors.

Favorite Emilia In Othello Quotes

1. "And it's what you never will write," said the Controller. "Because, if it were really like Othello nobody could understand it, however new it might be. And if were new, it couldn't possibly be like Othello."
Author: Aldous Huxley
2. "I adore you, Emilia Ward, let me worship you and I will be your dog, your slave… anything you want. Just don't leave me."
Author: Amanda Lance
3. "–Los hombres son así desde que nacen –le comentó a su hija Emilia mientras la acomodaba en su cesta–. Quieren todo, pero no lo saben pedir."
Author: Ángeles Mastretta
4. "Let my memories of you be like water on the moon. A beautiful impossibility-but allowing me to sleep and dream of infinite beginnings rather than Othello endings."
Author: Carew Papritz
5. "Emilia typed in her password and checked her inbox. A review by the Secretariat de Gobernación of drug cartel activities across Mexico. A report of a robbery in Acapulco's poorest barrio neighborhood that would probably never be investigated. Notice of a reward for a child kidnapped in Ixtapa who was almost certainly dead by now. Her phone rang. It was the desk sergeant saying that a Señor Rooker wished to see her. Emilia avoided Rico's eye as she said, yes, the sergeant could let el señor pass into the detectives' area.A minute later Rucker was standing by her desk, sweat beaded on his forehead. The starched collar of his shirt was damp. "There's a head," he said breathlessly. "Someone's head in a bucket on the hood of my car."
Author: Carmen Amato
6. "Tampoco dice nada doña Carmen Bravo, a lo que he podido ver, de cuando doña Emilia Pardo Bazán se quitaba la dentadura postiza para hacerle mejores oficios a Perez-Galdós o a don Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, que ahí no llega mi erudición de monaguillo sobre el naturalismo español."
Author: Francisco Umbral
7. "Sufletul lui Othello era pur si simplu zdrobit si de aceea se dezechilibrase toata conceptia lui despre lume, pentru ca idealul lui era mort."
Author: Fyodor Dostoyevsky
8. "If the distinction is not held too rigidly nor pressed too far, it is interesting to think of Shakespeare's chief works as either love dramas or power dramas, or a combination of the two. In his Histories, the poet handles the power problem primarily, the love interest being decidedly incidental. In the Comedies, it is the other way around, overwhelmingly in the lighter ones, distinctly in the graver ones, except in Troilus and Cressida--hardly comedy at all--where without full integration something like a balance is maintained. In the Tragedies both interests are important, but Othello is decidedly a love drama and Macbeth as clearly a power drama, while in Hamlet and King Lear the two interests often alternate rather than blend."
Author: Harold Clarke Goddard
9. "Meredith,' interposed Celia, 'makes one of his women, Emilia in England, say that poetry is like talking on tiptoe; like animals in cages, always going to one end and back again."
Author: Harold Frederic
10. "Cordelia loved his explanations. She loved knowing words that belonged to things she'd never seen, even to things you couldn't see at all. She remembered those words carefully. "Magic," George had said, "is something unnatural, something that doesn't really exist. If I snap my fingers and Othello suddenly turns white, that's magic. If I fetch a bucket of paint and paint him white, it isn't." He laughed, and for a moment it looked as if he felt like snapping his fingers or fetching that bucket. Then he went on, "Everything that looks like magic is really a trick. There's no such thing as magic." Cordelia grazed with relish. "Magic" was her favorite word - for something that didn't exist at all."
Author: Leonie Swann
11. "'Othello' was my first Shakespearean discovery. I was obsessed with drama at school, and I studied the play for my English GCSE. Desdemona is the part that everyone wants, but Iago's wife Emilia is the one I've always been drawn to."
Author: Michelle Dockery
12. "I am no Othello, Othello was a lie."
Author: Tayeb Salih
13. "Coleridge's description of Iago's actions as "motiveless malignancy" applies in some degree to all the Shakespearian villains. The adjective motiveless means, firstly, that the tangible gains, if any, are clearly not the principal motive, and, secondly, that the motive is not the desire for personal revenge upon another for a personal injury. Iago himself proffers two reasons for wishing to injure Othello and Cassio. He tells Roderigo that, in appointing Cassio to be his lieutenant, Othello has treated him unjustly, in which conversation he talks like the conventional Elizabethan malcontent. In his soliloquies with himself, he refers to his suspicion that both Othello and Cassio have made him a cuckold, and here he talks like the conventional jealous husband who desires revenge. But there are, I believe, insuperable objections to taking these reasons, as some critics have done, at their face value."
Author: W.H. Auden
14. "OTHELLO [Rising.]                         O, she was foul!— I scarce did know you, uncle; there lies your niece, Whose breath, indeed, these hands have newly stopp'd: I know this act shows horrible and grim. GRATIANO Poor Desdemona! I am glad thy father's dead: Thy match was mortal to him, and pure grief Shore his old thread in twain: did he live now, This sight would make him do a desperate turn, Yea, curse his better angel from his side, And fall to reprobance. OTHELLO 'Tis pitiful; but yet Iago knows That she with Cassio hath"
Author: William Shakespeare

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To survive as a human being is possible only through love. And, when Thanatos is ascendant, the instinct must be to reach out to those we love, to see in them all the divinity, pity, and pathos of the human. And to recognize love in the lives of others - even those with whom we are in conflict - love that is like our own. It does not mean we will avoid war or death. It does not mean that we as distinct individuals will survive. But love, in its mystery, has its own power. It alone gives us meaning that endures. I alone allows us to embrace and cherish life. Love as power both to resist in our nature what we know we we must resist, and to affirm what we know we must affirm. And love, as the poets remind us, is eternal."
Author: Chris Hedges

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