Top Ernest Quotes

Browse top 62 famous quotes and sayings about Ernest by most favorite authors.

Favorite Ernest Quotes

1. "I fear you do not fully comprehend the danger of abridging the liberties of the people. Nothing but the very sternest necessity can ever justify it. A government had better go to the very extreme of toleration, than to do aught that could be construed into an interference with, or to jeopardize in any degree, the common rights of its citizens."
Author: Abraham Lincoln
2. "Whatever our official pieties, deep down we all believe in lives. The sternest formalists are the loudest gossips, and if you ask a cultural-studies maven who believes in nothing but collective forces and class determinisms how she came to believe in this doctrine, she will begin to tell you, eagerly, the story of her life."
Author: Adam Gopnik
3. "I had this coming. I just have to take my medicine. I think I'll spend the weekend brooding about what a shitty friend I am and mourning the loss of the friendship. I might have Ben & Jerry over to keep me company. Or maybe Ernest and Julio Gallo.""Hey, no threesomes unless I get to watch."
Author: Amelia C. Gormley
4. "Even with a Democratic president behind the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a far larger percentage of Republicans than Democrats voted for it. Eminent Democratic luminaries voted against it, including Senators Ernest Hollings, Richard Russell, Sam Ervin, Albert Gore Sr., J. William Fulbright (Bill Clinton's mentor) and of course, Robert Byrd. Overall, 82 percent of Senate Republicans supported the Civil Rights Act of 1964, compared to only 66 percent of Democrats. In the House, 80 percent of Republicans voted for it, while only 63 percent of Democrats did.Crediting Democrats for finally coming on board with Republicans civil rights policies by supporting the 1964 act would be nearly as absurd as giving the Democrats all the glory for Regan's 1981 tax cuts - which passed with the support of 99 percent of Republicans but only 29 percent of Democrats."
Author: Ann Coulter
5. "Jack London and Ernest Hemingway, confidence swaggering into the storm: Man against Nature. Of all the possible conflicts, that was the one that was hopeless. Even a slim education had taught her this much: Man loses."
Author: Barbara Kingsolver
6. "Sure he was great, but don't forget that Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, .. backwards and in high heels."From: Frank and Ernest by Bob Thaves, art by Bob Thaves."
Author: Bob Thaves
7. "Understand what Ernest Becker meant when he said something like ‘To live fully is to live with an awareness of the rumble of terror that underlies everything,"
Author: Calvin Trillin
8. "There are quiet victories and struggles, great sacrifices of self, and noble acts of heroism, in it - even in many of its apparent lightnesses and contradictions - not the less difficult to achieve, because they have no earthly chronicle or audience - done every day in nooks and corners, and in little households, and in men's and women's hearts - any one of which might reconcile the sternest man to such a world, and fill him with belief and hope in it"
Author: Charles Dickens
9. "You remember Ernest Angley? TV healer. He'd slap people's foreheads—whap!—and they'd flop over, quivering like fish." She hooted in laughter. "I used to love watching him. It was like professional wrestling for Baptists."
Author: Daryl Gregory
10. "I remember having to read 'The Old Man and the Sea,' and I didn't want to read it; I didn't want to like Ernest Hemingway. I was being a stubborn teenager."
Author: Dree Hemingway
11. "'The Sun Also Rises' by Ernest Hemingway is my favorite book. You feel manly reading it."
Author: Elizabeth Olsen
12. "Ernesto Palmer got the name Chili originally because he was hot-tempered as a kid...Now he was Chili, Tommy Carlo said, because he had chilled down and didn't need the hot temper. All he had to do was turn his eyes dead when he looked at a slow pay, not say more than three words, and the guy would sell his wife's car to make the payment."
Author: Elmore Leonard
13. "For her everything was red, orange, gold-red from the sun on the closed eyes, and it all was that color, all of it, the filling, the possessing, the having, all of that color, all in a blindness of that color."- Ernest Hemingway,"
Author: Ernest Hemingway
14. "I even read aloud the part of the novel I had rewritten, which is about as low as a writer can get and much more dangerous for him than glacier skiing unroped before the full winter snowfall has set over the crevices.When they said, 'It's great, Ernest. Truly, it's great. You cannot know the thing it has," I wagged my tail in pleasure and plunged into the fiesta concept of life to see if I could not bring some attractive stick back, instead of thinking, 'If these bastards like it what is wrong with it?' That was what I would think if I had been functioning as a professional although, if I had been functioning as a professional, I would never have read it to them."
Author: Ernest Hemingway
15. "Zelda was very beautiful and was tanned a lovely gold colour and her hair was a beautiful dark gold and she was very friendly. Her hawk's eyes were clear and calm. I knew everything was all right and was going to turn out well in the end when she leaned forward and said to me, telling me her great secret, 'Ernest, don't you think Al Jolson is greater than Jesus?'Nobody thought anything of it at the time. It was only Zelda's secret that she shared with me, as a hawk might share something with a man. But hawks do not share. Scott did not write anything any more that was good until after he knew that she was insane."
Author: Ernest Hemingway
16. "Ernest Rutherford [is]...a second Newton."
Author: Ernest Rutherford
17. "Y tenía noventa años cuando mencionó, por última vez, con sus ojos humedecidos, al remoto Ernestito. Lo que prueba que los años, las desdichas, las desilusiones, lejos de facilitar el olvido, como se suele creer, tristemente lo refuerzan."
Author: Ernesto Sabato
18. "Znaš li da je mladi školski naraštaj silno glup ? Nekada je imao više pameti; zabavljao se ženama, macevanjem, orgijama; sad se doteruje po Bajronu, sanja o ocaju i do mile volje okiva sebi srce ... Utrkuju se ko ce imati blede lice i najlepše reci : sit sam sveta ! Sit sveta ! Žalosno zaista : sit sveta u osamnaestoj godini ! Zar ne postoji više ljubav, slava, poslovi ? Zar je sve umrlo ? Nema više prirode, nema cveca za mladog coveka ? Ostavimo se jednom toga. Dajmo se na tugu u umetnosti, pošto više osecamo tu stranu, ali dajmo se veselju u životu; neka puca zapušac, neka se drolja svlaci, sto mu muka ! Pa ako nam neke veceri, u sumrak, dok za jedan cas traju magla i sneg, dode neka dosada života, pustimo je neka dode, ali ne cesto. Treba sebi cešati srce s vremena na vreme sa malo bola, da sva gamad sa njega spadne. To je to što tebi savetujem, što se ja trudim da primenim. – Ernestu Ševalijeu, 15. Aprila 1839"
Author: Gustave Flaubert
19. "Hace tiempo, cuando se estrenó Grupo salvaje, de Sam Peckinpah, en la rueda de prensa una periodista alzó la mano y preguntó en tono inquisitivo: «¿Qué necesidad creen que hay en mostrar tanta sangre?». Ernest Borgnine, uno de los actores, respondió con aire perplejó: «Pero, señora, es que, cuando te disparan, sangras». La película se filmó en plena época de la guerra del Vietnam.Me gusta esta frase. Posiblemente sea uno de los principios básicos de la realidad. Aceptar las cosas difíciles de desentrañar como cosas difíciles de desentrañar, aceptar el hecho de sangrar. Disparar y sangrar.Es que, cuando te disparan, sangras."
Author: Haruki Murakami
20. "At our age, surely there are better things to sustain us, to sustain a marriage, than the brief flame of passion?" ..."You are mistaken, Ernest," she said at last. "There is only the passionate spark. Without it, two people living together may be lonelier than if they lived quite alone."
Author: Helen Simonson
21. "When George Plimpton asked Ernest Hemingway what the best training for an aspiring writer would be in a 1954 interview, Hem replied, "Let's say that he should go out and hang himself because he finds that writing well is impossibly difficult. Then he should be cut down without mercy and forced by his own self to write as well as he can for the rest of his life. At least he will have the story of the hanging to commence with."
Author: Hemingway Ernest
22. "His work was so great that it cannot be compassed in a few words. His death is one of the greatest losses ever to occur to British science.{Describing Ernest Rutherford upon his death at age 66. Thomson, then 80 years old, was once his teacher.}"
Author: His
23. "What? 'Borderline patients play games'? That what you said? Ernest, you'll never be a real therapist if you think like that. That's exactly what I meant earlier when I talked about the dangers of diagnosis. There are borderlines and there are borderlines. Labels do violence to people. You can't treat the label; you have to treat the person behind the label. (17)"
Author: Irvin D. Yalom
24. "Ernest Hemingway did a great deal toward making the writer an acceptable public figure; obviously, he was no sissy."
Author: Irwin Shaw
25. "Muereté, mi amor, suplico Ernesto de rodillas junto a la cama. Muereté hija, agregue yo en silencio, porque no me salio la voz..."
Author: Isabel Allende
26. "In his funeral oration the spokesman of the most artistic and critical of European nations, Ernest Renan, hailed him as one of the greatest writers of our times: ‘The Master, whose exquisite works have charmed our century, stands more than any other man as the incarnation of a whole race,' because ‘a whole world lived in him and spoke through his mouth.' Not the Russian world only, we may add, but the whole Slavonic world, to which it was ‘an honour to have been expressed by so great a Master."
Author: Ivan Turgenev
27. "The Christian cannot be satisfied so long as any human activity is either opposed to Christianity or out of all connection with Christianity. Christianity must pervade not merely all nations, but also all of human thought. The Christian cannot therefore be indifferent to any branch of ernest human endeavor. It must all be brought into some relation to the gospel. It must be studied either in order to be demonstrated false or else in order to be made useful to the kingdom of God. The church must not only seek to conquer every man for Christ, but also the whole of the man."
Author: J. Gresham Machen
28. "Oh how nice!" the lady said. But not corny. She was just nice & all. "I must tell Ernest we met," she said. "May I ask your name, dear?" "Rudolf Schmidt," I told her. I didn't feel like giving her my whole life history. Rudolf Schmidt was the name of the janitor of our dorm."
Author: J.D. Salinger
29. "One gets the impression that this is how Ernest Hemingway would have written had he gone to Vassar."
Author: Jack Paar
30. "There is no horizontal stratification of society in this country like the rocks in the earth, that hold one class down below forevermore, and let another come to the surface to stay there forever. Our stratification is like the ocean, where every individual drop is free to move, and where from the sternest depths of the mighty deep any drop may come up to glitter on the highest wave that rolls."
Author: James A. Garfield
31. "Born Virginia Marshall but nicknamed Gig, my mother was a home economics teacher who had come all the way across the whole state of Virginia, from her home on the Eastern Shore to our little Appalachian coal town to marry my daddy, Ernest Smith, whose family had lived in these mountains for generations."
Author: Lee Smith
32. "Ernest Ransom: These are not the best if times...as your editorials remind us A.A. Hayes : Why not get a Democrat back in there? Ernest Ransom: These are not the worst of times eithers Dingley Falls"
Author: Michael Malone
33. "From Ernest Hemingway's stories, I learned to listen within my stories for what went unsaid by my characters."
Author: Nadine Gordimer
34. "I might like to have someone courting me. But it would have to be someone who is a square shooter and who has a train load of courage. And it would have to be someone who doesn't have to talk down to folks to feel good, or to tell a person they are worthless ifthey just made a mistake. And he'd have to be not too thin. Why, I remember hugging [my brother] Ernest was like warpping your arms around a fence post,and I love Ernest, but I want a man who can hold me down in a wind. Maybe he'd have to be pretty stubborn. I don't have any use for a man that isn't stubborn. Likely a stubborn fellow will stay with you through thick and thin, and a spineless one will take off, or let his heart wander."
Author: Nancy E. Turner
35. "Who hasn't thought about killing themselves, as a kid? How can you grow up in this world and not think about it? It's an option taken by a lot of successful people: Ernest Hemingway, Socrates, Jesus. Even before high school, I thought that it would be a cool thing to do if I ever got really famous. If I kept making my maps, for instance, and some art collector came across them and decided to make them worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, if I killed myself at the height of that, they'd be worth millions of dollars, and I wouldn't be responsible for them anymore. I'd have left behind something that spoke for itself."
Author: Ned Vizzini
36. "But you don't really mean to say that you couldn't love me if my name wasn't Ernest?GWENDOLEN: But your name is Ernest.JACK: Yes, I know it is. But supposing it was something else? Do you mean to say you couldn't love me then?GWENDOLEN (glibly): Ah! that is clearly a metaphysical speculation, and like most metaphysical speculations has very little reference at all to the actual facts of real life, as we know them."
Author: Oscar Wilde
37. "What are the unreal things, but the passions that once burned one like fire? What are the incredible things, but the things that one has faithfully believed? What are the improbable things? The things that one has done oneself. No, Ernest; life cheats us with shadows, like a puppet- master. We ask it for pleasure. It gives it to us, with bitterness and disappointment in its train. We come across some noble grief that we think will lend the purple dignity of tragedy to our days, but it passes away from us, and things less noble take its place, and on some grey windy dawn, or odorous eve of silence and of silver, we find ourselves looking with callous wonder, or dull heart of stone, at the tress of gold-flecked hair that we had once so wildly worshipped and so madly kissed."
Author: Oscar Wilde
38. "An admirable idea! Mr. Worthing, there is just one question I would like to be permitted to put to you. Where is your brother Ernest? We are both engaged to be married to your brother Ernest, so it is a matter of some importance to us to know where your brother Ernest is at present."
Author: Oscar Wilde
39. "Do you think that Hemingway knew he was a writer at twenty years old? No, he did not. Or Fitzgerald, or Wolfe. This is a difficult concept to grasp. Hemingway didn't know he was Ernest Hemingway when he was a young man. Faulkner didn't know he was William Faulkner. But they had to take the first step. They had to call themselves writers. That is the first revolutionary act a writer has to make. It takes courage. But it's necessary"
Author: Pat Conroy
40. "There was no back home any more, not in the essential way, and that was part of Paris too. Why we couldn't stop drinking or talking or kissing the wrong people no matter what it ruined. Some of us had looked into the faces of the dead and tried not to remember anything in particular. Ernest was one of these. He often said he'd died in the war, just for a moment; that his soul had left his body like a silk handkerchief, slipping out and levitating over his chest. It had returned without being called back, and I often wondered if writing for him was a way of knowing his soul was there after all, back in its place. Of saying to himself, if not to anyone else, that he had seen what he'd seen and felt those terrible things and lived anyway. That he had died but wasn't dead any more."
Author: Paula McLain
41. "I met the devil,' Ernest said, finishing his glass of wine, 'and he doesn't give a damn about art."
Author: Paula McLain
42. "It was the end of Ernest's struggle with apprenticeship, and an end to other things as well. He would never again be unknown. We would never again be this unhappy."
Author: Paula McLain
43. "We knew what we had and what it meant, and though so much had happened since for both of us, there was nothing like those years in Paris, after the war. Life was painfully pure and simple and good, and I believed Ernest was his best self then. I got the very best of him. We got the best of each other."
Author: Paula McLain
44. "Veronica ran out to tell Amber the shocking news - and returned in less than a minute with another message for Yo-Yoji: "Amber says she was watching and she knows you got in detention on purpose," she said breathlessly. "Because you have a crush on Cass!" Cass's ears instantly turned red.Max-Ernest looked like he'd been hit by a truck."
Author: Pseudonymous Bosch
45. "Your problem, it is not here' - he pointed the pen at Max-Ernest's throat - 'it is here' - he pointed the pen at Max-Ernest's chest. 'My heart is heavy, too. But you must be strong. This situation, it is very serious. It is not only Cass's life that is at stake. If she dies, the Secret, it will die too."
Author: Pseudonymous Bosch
46. "The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives. She went on olden-day sailing ships with Joseph Conrad. She went to Africa with Ernest Hemingway and to India with Rudyard Kipling. She travelled all over the world while sitting in her little room in an English village."
Author: Roald Dahl
47. "One can,' said Ernest 'remain unmoved before a cloud as before an automatic ticket machine. I don't like poetry, I don't like flowers, I don't like machines, I don't like sugar, I don't like pepper, I don't like what you like.' This was addressed to whoever attacked Ernest."
Author: Robert Desnos
48. "Today, as in the past, we ought to remind ourselves that the true natural law is not a mere congeries of appetites, and that it is not from the vagrant musings of the hour's judges that the natural law derives its high authority. . . .The Catholic tradition of natural law, to borrow a phrase from Sir Ernest Barker, holds that "law--in the sense of last resort--is somehow above lawmaking." This understanding, in effect, still prevails among many Americans, not all of them Catholics. They agree with Justice Frankfurter that natural law is "what sensible and right-minded men do every day."Yet often the public's apprehension of the teachings of natural law is much decayed, in part because of the total secularization of instruction in public schools. . . .Human nature is not vulpine nature, leonine nature, or serpentine nature. Natural law is bound up with the concept of the dignity of man, and with the experience of humankind ever since the beginning of social community."
Author: Russell Kirk
49. "I'm not a writer. Ernest Hemingway was a writer. I just have a vivid imagination and type 90 WPM."
Author: Tiffany Madison
50. "To be or not to be tethered to the sordid, sickly, stinking, sappy apron strings of Hollywood and its endless fondness for fu**ing your sh** up. If Shakespeare were alive today, I bet he'd write a scintillating soliloquy about the Broken Brood of Big Shots. I bet he'd help you out, Micky Affias, ol' Will the Bard would. Listen, we'll come visit you. Okay? I'll dress up as William Shakespeare, Lucent as Emily Dickinson, and beautiful ‘Ray' as someone dashing and manly like Jules Verne or Ernest Hemingway, and we'll write on your white-room walls. We'll write you out of your supposed insanity. I love you, Micky Affias.-James (from "Descendants of the Eminent")"
Author: Tim Cummings

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Films with a message just make me laugh."
Author: Claude Chabrol

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