Top Good Humour Quotes

Browse top 34 famous quotes and sayings about Good Humour by most favorite authors.

Favorite Good Humour Quotes

1. "From the stage I've seen people of all ages absolutely roaring at really good toilet humour."
Author: Adrian Edmondson
2. "Ook, though very clever, was the worst fighter in the tribe. That is how he ended up with Grot-Grot as his woman. Grot-Grot had a bald patch on the top of her head, she was missing an eye and she smelled like a dead skunk. She did have a good sense of humour though."
Author: Aussiescribbler
3. "This gave me occasion to observe, that when Men are employ'd they are best contented. For on the Days they work'd they were good-natur'd and chearful; and with the consciousness of having done a good Days work they spent the Evenings jollily; but on the idle Days they were mutinous and quarrelsome, finding fault with their Pork, the Bread, and in continual ill-humour. (Autobiography, 1771)"
Author: Benjamin Franklin
4. "My father had a good sense of humour about a lot of things, including life, which I think I inherited."
Author: Brian Dennehy
5. "It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humour."
Author: Charles Dickens
6. "Comedy is the most difficult. Comic timing is something which you either have it in you, or you don't. You have to have a good sense of humour to be able to understand it. A split second can make you lose the punch."
Author: Deepika Padukone
7. "I was in the Square at the time. The crowd was a most good-humoured, easy going, smiling crowd; but presently it was transformed. A regiment of mounted police came cantering up."
Author: Edward Carpenter
8. "...there was less of the peevish temper of a child which frets and teases on purpose to be soothed, and more of the self-absorbed moroseness of a confirmed invalid, repelling consolation, and ready to regard the good-humoured mirth of others, as an insult."
Author: Emily Brontë
9. "Linton did not appear to remember what she talked of and he had evidently great difficulty in sustaining any kind of conversation. His lack of interest in the subjects she started, and his equal incapacity to contribute to her entertainment, were so obvious that she could not conceal her disappointment. An indefinite alteration had come over his whole person and manner. The pettishness that might be caressed into fondness, had yielded to a listless apathy; there was less of the peevish temper of a child which frets and teases on purpose to be soothed, and more of the self-absorbed moroseness of a confirmed invalid, repelling consolation, and ready to regard the good-humoured mirth of others as an insult. Catherine perceived, as well as I did, that he held it rather a punishment, than a gratification, to endure our company."
Author: Emily Brontë
10. "I like men with quick wit, good conversation and a great sense of humour. I love banter. I want a man to like me for me - I want him to be authentic."
Author: Emma Watson
11. "And what's a-trouble to you, Jackie?""Father," I said, feeling I might as well get it over while I had him ingood humour, "I had it all arranged to kill my grandmother."He seemed a bit shaken by that, all right, because he said nothingfor quite a while."My goodness," he said at last, "that'd be a shocking thing to do.What put that into your head?"Father," I said, feeling very sorry for myself, " she's an awful woman."
Author: Frank O'Connor
12. "Australians are geniuses with a good sense of humour."
Author: Fred Schneider
13. "Or rather, it made him into two people. He was by nature a cheerful almost irrepressible person with a great zest for life. He loved good talk and physical activity. He had a deep sense of humour and a great capacity for making friends. But from now onwards there was to be a second side, more private but predominant in his diaries and letters. This side of him was capable of bouts of profound despair. More precisely, and more closely related to his mother's death, when he was in this mood he had a deep sense of impending loss. Nothing was safe. Nothing would last. No battle would be won for ever."
Author: Humphrey Carpenter
14. "Her [Mrs Croft's] manners were open, easy, and decided, like one who had no distrust of herself, and no doubts of what to do; without any approach to coarseness, however, or any want of good humour. Anne gave her credit, indeed, for feelings of great consideration towards herself, in all that related to Kellynch; and it pleased her."
Author: Jane Austen
15. "Anne always contemplated them as some of the happiest creatures of her acquaintance; but still, saved as we all are, by some comfortable feeling of superiority from wishing for the possibility of exchange, she would not have given up her own more elegant and cultivated mind for all their enjoyments; and envied them nothing but that seemingly perfect good understanding and agreement together, that good-humoured mutual affection, of which she had known so little herself with either of her sisters."
Author: Jane Austen
16. "He is just what a young man ought to be," said she, "sensible, good-humoured, lively; and I never saw such happy manners!—so much ease, with such perfect good breeding!"
Author: Jane Austen
17. "Fanny Price was at this time just ten years old, and though there might not be much in her first appearance to captivate, there was, at least, nothing to disgust her relations. She was small of her age, with no glow of complexion, nor any other striking beauty; exceedingly timid and shy, and shrinking from notice; but her air, though awkward, was not vulgar, her voice was sweet, and when she spoke her countenance was pretty. Sir Thomas and Lady Bertram received her very kindly; and Sir Thomas, seeing how much she needed encouragement, tried to be all that was conciliating: but he had to work against a most untoward gravity of deportment; and Lady Bertram, without taking half so much trouble, or speaking one word where he spoke ten, by the mere aid of a good-humoured smile, became immediately the less awful character of the two."
Author: Jane Austen
18. "I shall be sure to say three dull things as soon as ever I open my mouth, shan't I? (looking round with the most good-humoured dependence on every body's assent)— Do not you all think I shall?" Emma could not resist. "Ah! ma'am, but there may be a difficulty. Pardon me— but you will be limited as to number—only three at once."
Author: Jane Austen
19. "Oh! very well," exclaimed Miss Bates, "then I need not be uneasy. 'Three things very dull indeed.' That will just do for me, you know. I shall be sure to say three dull things as soon as ever I open my mouth, shan't I?—(looking round with the most good-humoured dependence on every body's assent)—Do not you all think I shall?"Emma could not resist."Ah! ma'am, but there may be a difficulty. Pardon me—but you will be limited as to number—only three at once."Miss Bates, deceived by the mock ceremony of her manner, did not immediately catch her meaning; but, when it burst on her, it could not anger, though a slight blush shewed that it could pain her."
Author: Jane Austen
20. "Good-humoured, unaffected girls, will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women. They are two distinct orders of being."
Author: Jane Austen
21. "I think it's like music for the sake of music, and a lot of the words stem from liking music a lot, wanting to be a good band and having a good sense of humour, and living in a situation where we're free to pretty much do what we want."
Author: Jon Fishman
22. "Do you actually state what a pain in the ass I am in these songs?""Not those words exactly. No." He chuckled, his good humour returned. "You don't want me to lie and say everything's always fucking unicorns and rainbows, do you?" "Maybe. Yes. People are going to know these are about me. I have a reputation as a constant delight to protect."
Author: Kylie Scott
23. "When I was in film school, it was said that all good films were characterised by some form of humour."
Author: Lars Von Trier
24. "There he was. The infant Titus. His eyes were open but he was quite still. The puckered-up face of the newly-born child, old as the world, wise as the roots of trees. Sin was there and goodness, love, pity and horror, and even beauty for his eyes were pure violet. Earth's passions, earth's griefs, earth's incongruous, ridiculous humours - dormant, yet visible in the wry pippin of a face."
Author: Mervyn Peake
25. "And remember your promise," said Sam, wagging a finger at him. "Don't follow us." The man glared at him but kept silent...."What?" asked Sam, slightly confused by his good humour. "I can't believe you said that." "What?" "You wouldn't like me when I'm angry. Do you think you're the hulk or something?" He laughed again. Sam found himself smiling although he was just telling the man the truth. He wouldn't like him when he was angry. No-one did."
Author: Phillip W. Simpson
26. "Captivated by youth and beauty, and that appearance of good humour which youth and beauty generally give"
Author: Seth Grahame Smith
27. "I?I walk alone;The midnight streetSpins itself from under my feet;My eyes shutThese dreaming houses all snuff out;Through a whim of mineOver gables the moon's celestial onionHangs high.IMake houses shrinkAnd trees diminishBy going far; my look's leashDangles the puppet-peopleWho, unaware how they dwindle,Laugh, kiss, get drunk,Nor guess that if I choose to blinkThey die.IWhen in good humour,Give grass its greenBlazon sky blue, and endow the sunWith gold;Yet, in my wintriest moods, I holdAbsolute powerTo boycott color and forbid any flowerTo be.IKnow you appearVivid at my side,Denying you sprang out of my head,Claiming you feelLove fiery enough to prove flesh real,Though it's quite clearAll your beauty, all your wit, is a gift, my dear,From me."Soliloquy of the Solipsist", 1956"
Author: Sylvia Plath
28. "But I still read Shaw on a regular basis. What I love is the nakedness of the polemic and the irresistible good humour. For me, 'Major Barbara' is the greatest of all the plays in that it starts from the rational and proceeds to the ecstatic in a spectacular way, and leaves you very confused if you cling to Euclidean logic."
Author: Tony Kushner
29. "Orlando curtseyed; she complied; she flattered the good man's humours as she would not have done had his neat breeches been a woman's skirts, and his braided coat a woman's satin bodice. Thus, there is much to support the view that it is clothes that wear us and not we them' we may make them take the mould of arm or breast, but they mould our hearts, our brains, our tongues to their liking."
Author: Virginia Woolf
30. "Uncle alone in the house with the children said he'd dress up to amuse them. After a long wait, as he did not appear, they went down and saw a masked man putting the table silver into a bag. 'Oh, Uncle,' they cried in delight. 'Yes, isn't my make-up good?' said Uncle, taking his mask off. Thus goes the Hegelian syllogism of humour. Thesis: Uncle made himself up as a burglar (a laugh for the children); antithesis: it WAS a burglar (a laugh for the reader); synthesis: it still was Uncle (fooling the reader)."
Author: Vladimir Nabokov
31. "Miss Fairlie laughed with a ready good-humour, which broke out as brightly as if it had been part of the sunshine above us…"
Author: Wilkie Collins
32. "Danger is a good teacher, and makes apt scholars. So are disgrace, defeat, exposure to immediate scorn and laughter. There is no opportunity in such cases for self-delusion, no idling time away, no being off your guard (or you must take the consequences) - neither is there any room for humour or caprice or prejudice."
Author: William Hazlitt
33. "He began to feel that she was very lonely indeed. "If he'd been here," she said, "those cowards would never have dared to insult me." She thought about "him" with great sadness and perhaps longing--about his honest, stupid, constant kindness and fidelity; his never-ceasing obedience; his good humour; his bravery and courage. Very likely she cried, for she was particularly lively, and had put on a little extra rouge, when she came down to dinner."
Author: William Makepeace Thackeray
34. "When I feel well and in a good humour, or when I am taking a drive or walking after a good meal, or in the night when I cannot sleep, thoughts crowd into my mind as easily as you could wish."
Author: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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Ah, me resisto, mas me tienes toda, tú, que nunca serás del todo mío."
Author: Alfonsina Storni

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