Top Hurl Quotes

Browse top 216 famous quotes and sayings about Hurl by most favorite authors.

Favorite Hurl Quotes

1. "All in a moment Hurlow forgot the beauty of the sounds and smelt fear. He smelt it as an animal smells it, the breath cold in his nostrils. He had read about Pan, a dead god who might safely be patronized while poring over a book in a London lodging, but here and at this hour a god not to be scorned. ("Furze Hollow")"
Author: A.M. Burrage
2. "I'm an ugly girl,My face makes you hurl,Sad I have it, I should bag it.Acne everywhere, Unwanted facial hair.I'm a relation to Frankenstein's creation."
Author: Al Yankovic
3. "After telling the hard facts to anyone from lover to friend, I have changed in their eyes. Often it is awe or admiration, sometimes it is repulsion, once or twice it has been fury hurled directly at me for reasons I remain unsure of."
Author: Alice Sebold
4. "What geomancy reads what the windblown sand writes on the desert rock? I read there that all things live by a generous power and dance to a mighty tune; or I read there all things are scattered and hurled, that our every arabesque and grand jete is a frantic variation on our one free fall."
Author: Annie Dillard
5. "Depuis, plus personne ne parle du 27eme battalion. Pourtant, refusant de rejoindre le ciel, les fantômes, les demons nés de cette défaite continuent à errer parmi les buissons, à l'orée de la jungle, sur les rives du ruisseau. On a donné à ce coin de jungle perdu dans les brumes empoisonnées le nom effrayant de "terre des Ames hurlantes". De temps en temps, à l'occasion des cérémonies de l'enfer les morts se rassemblent sur cette langue de terre comme pour la revue des troupes. On peut entendre leurs voix dans le murmure du ruisseau, les plaintes étouffées, lancinantes de la jungle la nuit, les hurlements du vent à travers les gorges des montagnes. On peut les entendre, les comprendre."
Author: B?o Ninh
6. "Dogs don't like me. It is a simple law of the universe, like gravity. I am not exaggerating when I say that I have never passed a dog that didn't act as if it thought I was about to take its Alpo. Dogs that have not moved from the sofa in years will, at the sniff of me passing outside, rise in fury and hurl themselves at shut windows. I have seen tiny dogs, no bigger than a fluffy slipper, jerk little old ladies off their feet and drag them over open ground in a quest to get at my blood and sinew. Every dog on the face of the earth wants me dead."
Author: Bill Bryson
7. "The defiance of the good atheist hurled at an apparently ruthless and idiotic cosmos is really an unconscious homage to something in or behind that cosmos which he recognizes as infinitely valuable and authoritative: for if mercy and justice were really only private whims of his own with no objective and impersonal roots, and if he realized this, he could not go on being indignant. The fact that he arraigns heaven itself for disregarding them means that at some level of his mind he knows they are enthroned in a higher heaven still."
Author: C.S. Lewis
8. "With that, I hurled the slipper at him, not caring if I caused his decapitation. (I did not.) Marshaling what little dignity I yet possessed, I stomped down the corridor - challenging indeed with one shoe - and around the corner. I lay awake for hours. The prince had no right, not one, to indict me so, and if I had held the slightest hope of the book's assistance, I would have climbed at once to my wizard room for a spell with which to punish him. Death, perhaps, or humiliation. A croaking frog would be nice, particularly a frog that retained Florian's dark eyes. I should keep it in a box and poke it occasionally with a stick; that would be satisfying indeed."
Author: Catherine Gilbert Murdock
9. "I hurled the slipper at him, not caring if I caused his decapitation. (I did not.)"
Author: Catherine Gilbert Murdock
10. "À une passanteLa rue assourdissante autour de moi hurlait.?Longue, mince, en grand deuil, douleur majestueuse,?Une femme passa, d'une main fastueuse?Soulevant, balançant le feston et l'ourlet;Agile et noble, avec sa jambe de statue.?Moi, je buvais, crispé comme un extravagant,?Dans son oeil, ciel livide où germe l'ouragan,?La douceur qui fascine et le plaisir qui tue.Un éclair . . . puis la nuit! — Fugitive beauté ?Dont le regard m'a fait soudainement renaître,?Ne te verrai-je plus que dans l'éternité?Ailleurs, bien loin d'ici! trop tard! jamais peut-être!?Car j'ignore où tu fuis, tu ne sais où je vais,?Ô toi que j'eusse aimée, ô toi qui le savais!"
Author: Charles Baudelaire
11. "The broken branch hissed loudly, and then thatwind was converted into these words: "Briefly willyou be answered.When the fierce soul departs from the body fromwhich it has uprooted itself, Minos sends it to theseventh mouth.It falls into the wood, and no place is assigned toit, but where chance hurls it, there it sprouts like agrain of spelt.It grows into a shoot, then a woody plant; theHarpies, feeding on its leaves, give it pain and awindow for the pain.Like the others, we will come for our remains, butnot so that any may put them on again, for it is notjust to have what one has taken from oneself.Here we will drag them, and through the sadwood our corpses will hang, each on the thornbrushof the soul that harmed it."
Author: Dante Alighieri
12. "We all want to break our orbits, float like a satellite gone wild in space, run the risk of disintegration. We all want to take our lives in our own hands and hurl them out among the stars."
Author: David Bottoms
13. "Aunt Dove gave her a wink. "Just enjoy yourself, pet. And if you see a likely lad, make sure you dance with him, something nice and slow." "I'm not looking for romance, you know." "Who said anything about romance?" Aunt Dove widened her eyes. "But if you dance slowly with a fellow, you can usually tell if he knows what he's about in the bedroom. And make sure you feel his bottom. You want one that's nice and pert. It means he's a good thruster." Evie fled before Aunt Dove could offer any further advice, hurrying down the stairs and hurling herself into the first cab she saw."
Author: Deanna Raybourn
14. "Nick? Nick Hurley?" I asked, laughing.He took back his hat. "You'll be sorry to hear I don't make gross faces as much as I used to. Now I'd rather smile at girls.""I noticed"He waved his hat around as if he was trying to dry it, his green eyes sparkling at me, as full of fun and trouble as when he was in elementary school. I realxed."
Author: Elizabeth Chandler
15. "War is hell, but sometimes in the midst of that hell men do things that heaven itself must be proud of. A hand grenade is hurled into a group of men. One of the men throws himself on top of it, making his body a living shield. In the burst of wild fire he dies, and the others live. Heroism is only a word, often a phony one. This is an action for which there is no good word because we can hardly even imagine it, let alone give it its proper name. Very literally, one man takes death into his bowels, takes fire into his own sweet flesh, so that the other men can take life, some of them men he hardly knows."
Author: Frederick Buechner
16. "The Windhover To Christ our Lord I CAUGHT this morning morning's minion, king- dom of daylight's dauphin, dapple-dawn-drawn Falcon, in his riding Of the rolling level underneath him steady air, and striding High there, how he rung upon the rein of a wimpling wing In his ecstasy! then off, off forth on swing, As a skate's heel sweeps smooth on a bow-bend: the hurl and gliding Rebuffed the big wind. My heart in hiding Stirred for a bird,—the achieve of; the mastery of the thing! Brute beauty and valour and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here Buckle! AND the fire that breaks from thee then, a billion Times told lovelier, more dangerous, O my chevalier! No wonder of it: shéer plód makes plough down sillion Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear, Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermillion."
Author: Gerard Manley Hopkins
17. "Actors really are superstitious. You can always spot a group of actors at a restaurant. They're the ones spitting on their knuckles and hurling salt everywhere."
Author: Gregg Henry
18. "He racked his brains for a way of making his declaration. Torn all the while between fear of offending and shame at his own faint-heartedness, he wept tears of dejection and desire. Then he made forceful resolutions. He wrote letters, and tore them up; he gave himself a time limit, then extended it. Often he started out with a determination to dare all; but his decisiveness quickly deserted him in Emma's presence [...]Emma, for her part, never questioned herself to find out whether she was in love with him. Love, she believed, must come suddenly, with thunder and lightning, a hurricane from on high that swoops down into your life and turns it topsy-turvy, snatches away your will-power like a leaf, hurls your heart and soul into the abyss. She did not know how on the terrace of a house the rain collects in pools when the gutters are choked; and she would have continued to feel quite safe had she not suddenly discovered a crack in the wall."
Author: Gustave Flaubert
19. "He gave them what they demanded of him, he obeyed the command, but not sullenly or diffidently, and not in shame. Rooted in the land of his fathers, standing before the home of his family he looked towards the sun and let a name burst forth from his soul.'Tigana!' he cried that all should hear. All of them, everyone in the square. And again, louder yet: 'Tigana!' And then a third, a last time, at the very summit of his voice, with pride, with love, with a lasting, unredeemed defiance of the heart.'TIGANA!'Through the square that cry rang, along the streets, up to the windows where people watched, over the roofs of houses running westward to the sea or eastward to the temples, and far beyond all of these-- a sound, a name, a hurled sorrow in the brightness of the air."
Author: Guy Gavriel Kay
20. "And so it was I entered the broken worldTo trace the visionary company of love, its voiceAn instant in the wind (I know not whither hurled)But not for long to hold each desperate choice."
Author: Hart Crane
21. "...he uttered the cry of a creature hurled over an abyss..."
Author: Henry James
22. "Did he just rip out the engine?" I asked."Yes", Saiman said. "And now he is demolishing the Maserati with it."Ten seconds later Curran hurled the twisted wreck of black and orange that used to be the Maserati into the wall.The first melodic notes of an old song came from the computer. I glanced at Saiman.He shrugged. "It begged for a soundtrack."
Author: Ilona Andrews
23. "Winter hurled more wind and rain at the city than it ever had before. Clouds dashed about in all directions emptying their thunder, hail and rain. The horizon was choked in fog."
Author: Ismail Kadaré
24. "But I should have known from her original announcement of independence to believe in the sincerity of her distaste for involvement, instead hurling on at her as if and because in fact I wanted to be hurt and 'lacerate' myself"
Author: Jack Kerouac
25. "Only Esmeralda was not weeping. Instead she wore that wooden look that whites mistake for churlishenss or indifference. Woodrew knew it was neither. It was familiarity. This how real life is constituted, it said. This is grief and hatred and people hacked to death. This is the everyday we have known since we were born and you Wazungu have not."
Author: John Le Carré
26. "Him the Almighty Power Hurled headlong naming from the ethereal sky, With hideous ruin and combustion, down To bottomless perdition ; there to dwell In adamantine chains and penal fire, Who durst defy the Omnipotent to arms."
Author: John Milton
27. "You deny our vows. You deny my rights. You abuse my pride and leave me nothing of yourself. You send me from you on some lackey's strength. You betray me at every turn." Shanna met his glare and hurled a fierce reply. "You took my heart and set your fingers firm around it, then, no doubt delighted at your success, you rent it with unfaithfulness.""Unfaithfulness is only from a husband. You play the same to me and yet do say I am no spouse.""You plead you are my husband true and spite the suitors come to woo me.""Yea!" Ruark raged. "Your suitors flock about your skirts in heated lust, and you yield them more than me."Shanna paused before him, rage etched upon her face. "You're a churlish cad!""They fondle you boldly and you set not their hands away from you.""A knavish blackguard!""You are a married woman!""I am a widow!""You are my wife!" Ruark shouted to be heard over the rising wind outside."
Author: Kathleen E. Woodiwiss
28. "Your brother is a beslubbering, churlish, hell-governed princox, and I hope one day he gets the beating he deserves for it. (Maggie)"
Author: Kinley MacGregor
29. "Some folks believe. Some folds need to see to believe. Some folds need their loved ones hurled off the top of a castle by a spirit-bitch-from-hell to believe."
Author: Kristen Ashley
30. "At one point, she'd wanted to hurl the whole breakfast at the wall. And then she'd remember why it was that men had temper tantrums and women didn't: cleanup."
Author: Kristin Hannah
31. "Being near her was like balancing on a tipping world, trying to keep your footing as the ground wanted to roll you forward, hurl you into a spiral from which there was no recovery, only impact, and it was a longed-for impact, a sweet and beckoning collision."
Author: Laini Taylor
32. "He's gone,' Sara said. 'I can feel it. This time for good.'Natalie hugged her, and she started to sob. Then Harry shattered the silence with a pained yell, hurling his thermos into the woods. With tears in his eyes, he said, 'I want a drink.'I hugged him fiercely. 'It'll have to be one of my special chais, Harry. Have I made you a dirty one yet?''I want mine filthy,' he said.We trudged back to the museum together, and toasted Coby with dirty vanilla chai lattes."
Author: Lee Nichols
33. "With a dreamy sigh, I prop my chin on my fists. "Who knew that one day I'd be on a date with the lead singer from a famous boy band?"He scowls. "Infinite Gray was not a boy band.""Were there any girls in the band?""No.""That makes you a boy band.""It made us an all-male rock group."I bite back my smile. He's so cute when he's irritated. "Right, like 'N Sync."He winces. "Not like 'N Sync. Jesus, watch where you hurl those things. Words hurt, Maggie."
Author: Lexi Ryan
34. "I'm hurling all the little joys against the greater sadness. The sadness is a giant weight. It presses down. Its mean: "What's the point?"
Author: Luke Davies
35. "The past was something that had happened to another version of himself, a version that could be lit and hurled away."
Author: Maggie Stiefvater
36. "The sheer quantity of brain power that hurled itself voluntarily and quixotically into the search for new baseball knowledge was either exhilarating or depressing, depending on how you felt about baseball. The same intellectual resources might have cured the common cold, or put a man on Pluto."
Author: Michael Lewis
37. "Si le nourrisson humain, seul de tout le règne animal, manifeste immédiatement sa présence au monde par des hurlements de souffrance incessants, c'est bien entendu qu'il souffre de manière intolérable. {...) À tout observateur impartial en tout cas il apparaît que l'individu humain ne peut pas être heureux, qu'il n'est en aucune manière conçu pour le bonheur, et que sa seule destinée possible est de propager le malheur autour de lui en rendant l'existence des autres aussi intolérable que l'est la sienne propre - ses premières victimes étant généralement ses parents."
Author: Michel Houellebecq
38. "But surely, Philip Philipovich, everybody says that 30-degree vodka is quite good enough.' ‘Vodka should be at least 40 degrees, not 30 – that's firstly,' Philip Philipovich interrupted him didactically, ‘and secondly – God knows what muck they make into vodka nowadays. What do you think they use?' ‘Anything they like,' said the other doctor firmly. ‘I quite agree,' said Philip Philipovich and hurled the contents of his glass down his throat in one gulp. ‘Ah . . . m'm . . . Doctor Bormenthal – please drink that at once and if you ask me what it is, I'm your enemy for life. "From Granada to Seville . . ." Chapter 3"
Author: Mikhail Bulgakov
39. "In matters large and small, many people seemed concerned about churlishness, an ugliness in our relationships that appears to be increasing rather than decreasing."
Author: Nick Clooney
40. "I heard from clear across the city, over the Hudson in the Jersey yards, one fierce whistle of a locomotive which took me to a train late at night hurling through the middle of the West, its iron shriek blighting the darkness. One hundred years before, some first trains had torn through the prairie and their warning had congealed the nerve. "Beware," said the sound. "Freeze in your route. Behind this machine comes a century of maniacs and a heat which looks to consume the earth." What a rustling those first animals must have known."
Author: Norman Mailer
41. "If a hand, a situation, a wave were ever to raise me up and carry me to where I could command power and influence, I would destroy the circumstances that had favoured me, and I would hurl myself down into the humble, speechless, insignificant darkness. I can only breathe in the lower regions."
Author: Robert Walser
42. "But the point is, when the writer turns to address the reader, he or she must not only speak to me—naively dazzled and wholly enchanted by the complexities of the trickery, and thus all but incapable of any criticism, so that, indeed, he can claim, if he likes, priestly contact with the greater powers that, hurled at him by the muse, travel the parsecs from the Universe's furthest shoals, cleaving stars on the way, to shatter the specific moment and sizzle his brains in their pan, rattle his teeth in their sockets, make his muscles howl against his bones, and to galvanize his pen so the ink bubbles and blisters on the nib (nor would I hear her claim to such as other than a metaphor for the most profound truths of skill, craft, or mathematical and historical conjuration)—but she or he must also speak to my student, for whom it was an okay story, with just so much description."
Author: Samuel R. Delany
43. "A wound gives strange dignity to him who bears it. Well men shy from his new and terrible majesty. It is as if the wounded man's hand is upon the curtain which hangs before the revelations of all existence - the meaning of ants, potentates, wars, cities, sunshine, snow, a feather dropped from a bird's wing; and the power of it sheds radiance upon a bloody form, and makes the other men understand sometimes that they are little. His comrades look at him with large eyes thoughtfully. Moreover, they fear vaguely that the weight of a finger upon him might send him headlong, precipitate the tragedy, hurl him at once into the dim, gray unknown.("An Episode Of War")"
Author: Stephen Crane
44. "In a rabbit-fear I may hurl myself under the wheels of the car because the lights terrify me, and under the dark blind death of wheels I will be safe. I am very tired, very banal, very confused. I do not know who I am tonight. I wanted to walk until I dropped and not complete the inevitable circle of coming home."
Author: Sylvia Plath
45. "Nature loves courage. You make the commitment and nature will respond to that commitment by removing impossible obstacles. Dream the impossible dream and the world will not grind you under, it will lift you up. This is the trick. This is what all these teachers and philosophers who really counted, who really touched the alchemical gold, this is what they understood. This is the shamanic dance in the waterfall. This is how magic is done. By hurling yourself into the abyss and discovering its a feather bed."
Author: Terence McKenna
46. "For there was need once more of a Divine Revelation to the torpid frivolous children of men, if they were not to sink altogether into the ape condition. And in that whirlwind of the Universe,—lights obliterated, and the torn wrecks of Earth and Hell hurled aloft into the Empyrean; black whirlwind, which made even apes serious, and drove most of them mad,—there was, to men, a voice audible; voice from the heart of things once more, as if to say: "Lying is not permitted in this Universe. The wages of lying, you behold, are death. Lying means damnation in this Universe; and Beelzebub, never so elaborately decked in crowns and mitres, is NOT God!" This was a revelation truly to be named of the Eternal, in our poor Eighteenth Century; and has greatly altered the complexion of said Century to the Historian ever since."
Author: Thomas Carlyle
47. "This is man: a writer of books, a putter-down of words, a painter of pictures, a maker of ten thousand philosophies. He grows passionate over ideas, he hurls scorn and mockery at another's work, he finds the one way, the true way, for himself, and calls all others false--yet in the billion books upon the shelves there is not one that can tell him how to draw a single fleeting breath in peace and comfort. He makes histories of the universe, he directs the destiny of the nations, but he does not know his own history, and he cannot direct his own destiny with dignity or wisdom for ten consecutive minutes."
Author: Thomas Wolfe
48. "The big system can be pretty overwhelming. We know that we can't beat them by competing with them. What we can do is build small systems where we live and work that serve our needs as we de?ne us and not as they ‘re de?ned for us. The big boys in their shining armor are up there on castle walls hurling their thunderbolts. We're the ants patiently carrying sand a grain at a time from under the castle wall. We work from the bottom up. The knights up there don't see the ants and don't know what we're doing. They'll ?gure it out only when the wall begins to fall. It takes time and quiet persistence. Always remember this: They ?ght with money and we resist with time, and they're going to run out of money before we run out of time"
Author: Utah Phillips
49. "A Klee painting named 'Angelus Novus' shows an angel looking as though he is about to move away from something he is fixedly contemplating. His eyes are staring, his mouth is open, his wings are spread. This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in his wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them. This storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress."
Author: Walter Benjamin
50. "Whats here a cup closed in my true loves hand poisin i see hath been his timeless end. oh churl drunk all and left no friendly drop to help me after. i will kiss thy lips some poisin doth hang on them, to help me die with a restorative. thy lips are warm.yea noise then ill be brief oh happy dagger this is thy sheath. there rust and let me die."
Author: William Shakespeare

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It's Latin, which is an excellent language for mischief-making, which is why governments are so fond of it."
Author: Catherynne M. Valente

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