Top Jane Austen Quotes

Browse top 82 famous quotes and sayings about Jane Austen by most favorite authors.

Favorite Jane Austen Quotes

1. "Look at Jane Austen. Her characters derive in a reasonably straight line from fairy tales."
Author: Andrew Davies
2. "All reading is good reading. And all reading of Jane Austen and Charles Dickens is sublime reading."
Author: Anna Quindlen
3. "Jane Austen may not be the best writer, but she certainly writes about the best people. And by that I mean people just like me."
Author: Anna Quindlen
4. "Even when there were good wars to write about, writers such as Jane Austen wrote novels concerning marriage. They usually went like this:'You're being a real jerk.''Sorry about that. I was secretly helping you.''Oh, you're wonderful! And you have so much money! You're my new favorite cousin!''Let's get married."The End."
Author: Dan Wilbur
5. "A simple creature unlettyrde. Julian of Norwich called herself. The most unlearned and uninformed female who ever dared to be an authoress. Echoed Jane Austen—four hundred years afterward."
Author: David Markson
6. "Now I was more certain than ever of my decision. I could not love a man who did not love Jane Austen."
Author: Deanna Raybourn
7. "I am a Jane Austenite, and therefore slightly imbecile about Jane Austen. […] She is my favourite author! I read and re-read, the mouth open and the mind closed. Shut up in measureless content, I greet her by the name of most kind hostess, while criticism slumbers."
Author: E.M. Forster
8. "A bookseller," said grandfather, "is the link between mind and mind, the feeder of the hungry, very often the binder up of wounds. There he sits, your bookseller, surrounded by a thousand minds all done up neatly in cardboard cases; beautiful minds, courageous minds, strong minds, wise minds, all sorts and conditions. There come into him other minds, hungry for beauty, for knowledge, for truth, for love, and to the best of his ability he satisfies them all...yos...it's a great vocation...Moreover his life is one of wide horizons. He deals in the stuff of eternity and there's no death in a bookseller's shop. Plato and Jane Austen and Keats sit side by side behind his back, Shakespeare is on his right hand and Shelley on his left."
Author: Elizabeth Goudge
9. "I'm named after Jane Austen's Emma, and I've always been able to relate to her. She's strong, confident but quite tactless."
Author: Emma Donoghue
10. "...in other words, all I want to be is the Jane Austen of south AlabamaInterview - March 1964"
Author: Harper Lee
11. "We've been texting for weeks. Surely it's rather like in Jane Austen's day when they did letter-writing for months and months and then just, like, immediately got married?''Bridget. Sleeping with a twenty-nine-year-old off Twitter on the second date is not "rather like Jane Austen's day"."
Author: Helen Fielding
12. "Bridget. Sleeping with a twenty-nine-year-old off twitter on the second date is not "rather like in Jane Austen's day"."
Author: Helen Fielding
13. "She had lolled about for three years at Girton with the kind of books she could equally have read at home--Jane Austen, Dickens, Conrad, all in the library downstairs, in complete sets. How had that pursuit, reading the novels that others took as their leisure, let her think she was superior to anyone else?"
Author: Ian McEwan
14. "Perhaps it's one of those cases of a microcosm giving you the whole world. Like a spode dinner plate. Or a single cell. Or, as daisy says, like a Jane Austen novel. When player and listener together know the route so well, the pleasure is in the deviation, the unexpected turn against the grain. To see a world in a grain of sand. So it is, Perowne tries to convince himself, with clipping an aneurysm: absorbing variation on an unchanging theme."
Author: Ian McEwan
15. "I always advise children who ask me for tips on being a writer to read as much as they possibly can. Jane Austen gave a young friend the same advice, so I'm in good company there."
Author: J.K. Rowling
16. "Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor...which is one very strong argument in favour of matrimony...Quote from a Jane Austen Letter 13 March, 1817"
Author: Jane Austen
17. "At college, I was told there were four great women novelists in the 19th century – Jane Austen, George Eliot, Charlotte and Emily Brontë. Not one of them led an enviable life – all of them had to sacrifice ludicrously in order to be writers. I wasn't prepared to do that.You could become ill so that you could retreat to the bedroom, avoid your domestic responsibilities and write like Emily Dickinson and Christina Rossetti. You had to forget about writing if you weren't prepared to sacrifice any other things you might want from life, like kids or lovers. It's not like that now."
Author: Jeanette Winterson
18. "It was the marriage that was important; Jane Austen rarely even bothered to write about the wedding."
Author: Karen Joy Fowler
19. "My new favorite title is How Jane Austen Ruined My Life. I don't have the courage to read it, though. I'm afraid to discover she's ruined mine as well."
Author: Katherine Reay
20. "Designer clothes, bubblegum pop music, celebrity heartthrobs - I couldn't give a fat rat's hairy ass. Just give me my hotdog and Jane Austen, and I'm good."
Author: Kristin Walker
21. "I couldn't exactly blame Jane Austen for being a romantic. What the hell else was there to do back then for fun?"
Author: Kristin Walker
22. "Mary-Lynnette: "You have not read 'Pride and Prejudice'."Ash: "Why not?"Mary-Lynnette: "Because Jane Austen was a human."Ash: "How do you know?"Mary-Lynnette: "Well Jane Austen was a woman, and you're a chauvinist pig."Ash: "Yes, well, that I can't argue."
Author: L.J. Smith
23. "Do you care for any contemporary authors?" Matthew inquired. "I adore Jane Austen." Matthew nodded. "I find her portrait of British society so accurate and yet so dreadful." "I agree. It must be awful to be so bound by what society expects," Lisbeth answered. "I am so glad to have been born in America, where one has freedom."
Author: Laila Ibrahim
24. "Besides, she had survived the searingly hot nights, when sleep was rendered impossible, by reading a miasma of English novels by Jane Austen and the Brontë sisters. They had served to fire her belief that 'true love' would one day be found."
Author: Lucinda Riley
25. "I'm a Jane Austen/Jane Eyre kind of girl."
Author: Maggie Grace
26. "...we may indeed assume, with a high degree of probability, that Jane Austen went commando."
Author: Margaret C. Sullivan
27. "I haven't any right to criticize books, and I don't do it except when I hate them. I often want to criticize Jane Austen, but her books madden me so that I can't conceal my frenzy from the reader; and therefore I have to stop every time I begin. Every time I read Pride and Prejudice I want to dig her up and beat her over the skull with her own shin-bone."
Author: Mark Twain
28. "Just the omission of Jane Austen's books alone would make a fairly good library out of a library that hadn't a book in it."
Author: Mark Twain
29. "All my life I thought that the story was over when the hero and heroine were safely engaged -- after all, what's good enough for Jane Austen ought to be good enough for anyone. But it's a lie. The story is about to begin, and every day will be a new piece of the plot."
Author: Mary Ann Shaffer
30. "Suicide may be a problem a other colleges, but never at Barnard. Our young ladies are too well-born even to consider it. All right, I'm lying. This is a miserable place to go to school and many undergraduates do attempt suicide. But I really don't want my students calling me at all hours bewailing their personal problems. I'm a novelist, not a social worker. And I think it was Jane Austen, or it might have been Mick Jagger, who said, "don't hang around cause two's a crowd on my cloud."
Author: Mary Gordon
31. "All the Jane Austen in the library cannot wash the Queens from this little hand."
Author: Mary Gordon
32. "As for Elizabeth Bennet, our chief reason for accepting her point of view as a reflection of her author's is the impression that she bears of sympathy between them--an impression of which almost every reader would be sensible, even if it had not the explicit confirmation of Jane Austen's letters. Yet, as she is presented to us in Pride and Prejudice, she is but a partial and sometimes perverse observer."
Author: Mary Lascelles
33. "Jane Austen never repeats herself."
Author: Mary Lascelles
34. "Others beside Jane Austen have made their Eltons, though none quite so cooly as she."
Author: Mary Lascelles
35. "Sympathy compounded of liking and compassion in varying proportions evidently seemed to Jane Austen the most natural inventive to imaginative interest in a character."
Author: Mary Lascelles
36. "As blue chips turn into penny stocks, Wall Street seems less like a symbol of America's macho capitalism and more like that famous Jane Austen character Mrs. Bennet, a flibbertigibbet always anxious about getting richer and her 'poor nerves.'"
Author: Maureen Dowd
37. "All Jane Austen novels have a common storyline: an attractive and virtuous young woman surmounts difficulties to achieve marriage to the man of her choice. This is the age-long convention of the romantic novel, but with Jane Austen, what we have is Mills & Boon written by a genius."
Author: P.D. James
38. "For [Jane Austen and the readers of Pride and Prejudice], as for Mr. Darcy, [Elizabeth Bennett's] solitary walks express the independence that literally takes the heroine out of the social sphere of the houses and their inhabitants, into a larger, lonelier world where she is free to think: walking articulates both physical and mental freedom."
Author: Rebecca Solnit
39. "It's not Jane Austen, it's not Henry James. But this writer, or writers, well, they're pretty damn good too."
Author: Richard Curtis
40. "'Pride and Prejudice' - perhaps more than any other Jane Austen book - is engrained in our literary consciousness."
Author: Seth Grahame Smith
41. "But if you read Jane Austen, you know that she had a wicked sense of humor. Not only was she funny, but her early writing was very dark and had a gothic tone to it."
Author: Seth Grahame Smith
42. "Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion; Karen Joy Fowler, The Jane Austen Book Club; Jon Spence, Becoming Jane Austen; Emma Campbell Webster, Lost in Austen; Laurie Viera Rigler, Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict; Amanda Grange, Mr. Darcy's Diary."
Author: Shannon Hale
43. "You know, there was a time when childbirth was possibly the most terrifying thing you could do in your life, and you were literally looking death in the face when you went ahead with it. And so this is a kind of flashback to a time when that's what every woman went through. Not that they got ripped apart, but they had no guarantees about whether they were going to live through it or not. You know, I recently read - and I don't read nonfiction, generally - Becoming Jane Austen. That's the one subject that would get me to go out and read nonfiction. And the author's conclusion was that one of the reason's Jane Austen might not have married when she did have the opportunity...well, she watched her very dear nieces and friends die in childbirth! And it was like a death sentence: You get married and you will have children. You have children and you will die. (Laughs) I mean, it was a terrifying world."
Author: Stephenie Meyer
44. "I always figured nerves were for Jane Austen characters and helium-voiced girls who never buy their round; I would no more have turned shaky in a crisis than I would have carried smelling salts around in my reticule."
Author: Tana French
45. "Jane Austen easily used half a page describing someone else's eyes; she would not appreciate summarizing her reading tastes in ten titles."
Author: Tracy Chevalier
46. "Did Jane Austen ruin lives by giving people false expectations about love? Were her heroes just too good to be true? Could a real man of flesh and blood ever hope to live up to such paragons? And were books with happy endings cruel? Did they give their readers a warped view of the world and what they could expect from it?"
Author: Victoria Connelly
47. "When, however, one reads of a witch being ducked, of a woman possessed by devils, of a wise woman selling herbs, or even of a very remarkable man who had a mother, then I think we are on the track of a lost novelist, a suppressed poet, of some mute and inglorious Jane Austen, some Emily Bronte who dashed her brains out on the moor or mopped and mowed about the highways crazed with the torture that her gift had put her to. Indeed, I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman."
Author: Virginia Woolf
48. "Anyone who has the temerity to write about Jane Austen is aware of [two] facts: first, that of all great writers she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness; second, that there are twenty-five elderly gentlemen living in the neighbourhood of London who resent any slight upon her genius as if it were an insult to the chastity of their aunts."
Author: Virginia Woolf
49. "Here was a woman about the year 1800 writing without hate, without bitterness, without fear, without protest, without preaching. That was how Shakespeare wrote, I thought, looking at Antony and Cleopatra; and when people compare Shakespeare and Jane Austen, they may mean that the minds of both had consumed all impediments; and for that reason we do not know Jane Austen and we do not know Shakespeare, and for that reason Jane Austen pervades every word that she wrote, and so does Shakespeare."
Author: Virginia Woolf
50. "[Jane] Austen was not a novelist for nothing: she knew that our stories are what make us human, and that listening to someone else's stories -- entering into their feelings, validating their experiences -- is the highest way of acknowledging their humanity, the sweetest form of usefulness."
Author: William Deresiewicz

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Author: Antonin Scalia

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