Top Liam Quotes

Browse top 741 famous quotes and sayings about Liam by most favorite authors.

Favorite Liam Quotes

1. "People must not do things for fun. We are not here for fun. There is no reference to fun in any Act of Parliament."
Author: A. P. Herbert
2. "After the war, prompted by the Cardinal Archbishop of Paris, I entered Parliament so that a priest could speak out for the poor, as canon law at that time still permitted."
Author: Abbe Pierre
3. "For I dipt into the future, far as human eye could see,Saw the Vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be;Saw the heavens fill with commerce, argosies of magic sails,Pilots of the purple twilight, dropping down with costly bales;Heard the heavens fill with shouting, and there raind a ghastly dewFrom the nations airy navies grappling in the central blue;Far along the world-wide whisper of the south-wind rushing warm,With the standards of the peoples plunging thro the thunder-storm;Till the war-drums throbbd, no longer, and the battle-flags were furledIn the Parliament of man, the Federation of the world. There the common sense of most shall hold a fretful realm in awe,And the kindly earth shall slumber, lapt in universal law."
Author: Alfred Tennyson
4. "Even with a Democratic president behind the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a far larger percentage of Republicans than Democrats voted for it. Eminent Democratic luminaries voted against it, including Senators Ernest Hollings, Richard Russell, Sam Ervin, Albert Gore Sr., J. William Fulbright (Bill Clinton's mentor) and of course, Robert Byrd. Overall, 82 percent of Senate Republicans supported the Civil Rights Act of 1964, compared to only 66 percent of Democrats. In the House, 80 percent of Republicans voted for it, while only 63 percent of Democrats did.Crediting Democrats for finally coming on board with Republicans civil rights policies by supporting the 1964 act would be nearly as absurd as giving the Democrats all the glory for Regan's 1981 tax cuts - which passed with the support of 99 percent of Republicans but only 29 percent of Democrats."
Author: Ann Coulter
5. "Un giorno,però, a diciotto anni, leggendo l'autobiografia di John Stuart Mill 1 , trovai questafrase: «Mio padre mi insegnò che la domanda: "Chi mi creò?" non può avere risposta,perché suggerisce immediatamente un nuovo interrogativo: "Chi creò Dio?"»Compresi allora quanto fosse errato l'argomento della Causa Prima. Se tutto deveavere una causa, anche Dio deve averla. Se niente può esistere senza una causa, alloraperché il mondo sì e Dio no? Questo principio della Causa Prima non è miglioredell'analoga teoria indù, che afferma come il mondo poggi sopra un elefante, el'elefante sopra una tartaruga. Alla domanda: «E la tartaruga dove poggia?» l'indùrispose: «Vogliamo cambiare discorso?» Non c'è dunque motivo per sostenere che ilmondo debba proprio avere una causa ed un'origine. Potrebbe anche essere sempreesistito. È soltanto la nostra scarsa immaginazione che vuole trovare un'origine atutto."
Author: Bertrand Russell
6. "[Traveling] makes you realize what an immeasurably nice place much of America could be if only people possessed the same instinct for preservation as they do in Europe. You would think the millions of people who come to Williamsburg every year would say to each other, "Gosh, Bobbi, this place is beautiful. Let's go home to Smellville and plant lots of trees and preserve all the fine old buildings." But in fact that never occurs to them. They just go back and build more parking lots and Pizza Huts."
Author: Bill Bryson
7. "It is true that I entered parliament at the age of 23, and have now been representing the people of my constituency for over twenty years."
Author: Charles Kennedy
8. "The foreign correspondent is frequently the only means of getting an important story told, or of drawing the world's attention to disasters in the making or being covered up. Such an important role is risky in more ways than one. It can expose the correspondent to actual physical danger; but there is also the moral danger of indulging in sensationalism and dehumanizing the sufferer. This danger immediately raises the question of the character and attitude of the correspondent, because the same qualities of mind which in the past separated a Conrad from a Livingstone, or a Gainsborough from the anonymous painter of Francis Williams, are still present and active in the world today. Perhaps this difference can best be put in one phrase: the presence or absence of respect for the human person."
Author: Chinua Achebe
9. "I'm Liam of Erinthia. I'm here to rescue you ... And You are not Cinderella. You are a tree branch wrapped in a sheet"
Author: Christopher Healy
10. "I left home when I was 17 with Joe Williams."
Author: David Edwards
11. "I thought I'd be a success even back in the mailroom at William Morris."
Author: David Geffen
12. "'I question the questioning of his sanity,' says Metzger. 'To me, he was simply passionate about the right things. He had a valid critique of the world and made it. If that's insanity, something's wrong. Personally, I think there's something wrong. With the world and not with John William.'"
Author: David Guterson
13. "Sometimes John had recorded new compositions, or lines from his new poems. Sometimes he'd just record a busy night in The Green Man. Sometimes sheep, seals, skylarks, the wind turbine. If Liam were home there would be some Liam. The summer fair. The Fastnet Race. I would unfold my map of Clear Island. Those tapes prised the lid off homesickness and rattled out the contents, but always at the bottom was solace."
Author: David Mitchell
14. "What Dino spent most of his time doing was hiring and firing new managers. Since he ditched William Tiero three-plus years ago, he just want through these poor guys like you go through a bag of M&M's when you've got your period. Consume, and on the the next."
Author: Deb Caletti
15. "...when scores of indicted criminals sit in parliament who could believe in the rule of law..."
Author: Donna Leon
16. "His leaf-gold tresses on end, his eyes in baskets from the long night without sleep, Phelim O'LiamRoe smacked his two fists together and cursed. The Queen Dowager, hardly aware of him, had turned her erect body to the window, followed by Margaret Erskine's wide eyes. But Michel Hérisson, who had arrived so unexpectedly on the Irishman's heels, ran his hacked and gouty hands through the wild white hair and said through his teeth, ‘Liam aboo, son, Liam aboo! My Gaelic's all out in holes, the way my arse is ridden out through my breeches; but if you are saying what I hope you are saying, Liam aboo, my son, Liam aboo!"
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
17. "I like sunny stories. You know, my favorite girls in the '50s were Debbie Reynolds, Doris Day, and Esther Williams."
Author: Edward Herrmann
18. "Compare King William with the philosopher Haeckel. The king is one of the anointed by the most high, as they claim—one upon whose head has been poured the divine petroleum of authority. Compare this king with Haeckel, who towers an intellectual colossus above the crowned mediocrity. Compare George Eliot with Queen Victoria. The Queen is clothed in garments given her by blind fortune and unreasoning chance, while George Eliot wears robes of glory woven in the loom of her own genius.The world is beginning to pay homage to intellect, to genius, to heart.We have advanced. We have reaped the benefit of every sublime and heroic self-sacrifice, of every divine and brave act; and we should endeavor to hand the torch to the next generation, having added a little to the intensity and glory of the flame."
Author: Haeckel
19. "We are a constitutional monarchy. I don't order laws, I propose them. Article 35 of our constitution states that the king can only refuse a law of parliament once, then he has to sign it - if the same law is then supported by a two-thirds majority in both houses of parliament."
Author: Hamad Bin Isa Al Khalifa
20. "I went to drama school for three years, and the whole thing there is that hopefully you are introduced to a man called William Shakespeare who is the greatest of all time of all storytelling."
Author: Hayley Atwell
21. "I swear to God . . .""God doesn't come to this part of the house, so swear to me." -Liam C"
Author: J.J. McAvoy
22. "Foreigners have been encouraged to settle among you. Industry and virtue have been promoted by mutual emulation and mutual inspection; commerce and the arts have flourished; and I cannot help attributing those continual exertions of genius which appear among you to the inspiration of liberty, and that love of fame and knowledge which always accompany it. Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind, and unfits it for every noble enterprise, every expanded prospect. How far this is the case with Virginia will more clearly appear when the ensuing trial is made.[Letter to William Bradford Jr. April 1 1774]"
Author: James Madison
23. "In the next room, perhaps twenty people were sitting around, drinking what looked like wine out of wine-glasses. They were the sort of people William and Louisa used to be in the habit of knowing, a crowd of elegant furniture, like the legs of a herd of gazelle taken together, and equally useless, when all things are considered."
Author: Jesse Ball
24. "Edith's clothes were flung in disarray on the floor beside the bed, the covers of which had been thrown back carelessly; she lay naked and glistening under the light on the white unwrinkled sheet. Her body was lax and wanton in its naked sprawl, and it shone like pale gold. William came nearer the bed. She was fast asleep, but in a trick of the light her slightly opened mouth seemed to shape the soundless words of passion and love. He stood looking at her for a long time. He felt a distant pity and reluctant friendship and familiar respect; and he felt also a weary sadness, for he knew that he would never again be moved as he had once been moved by her presence. The sadness lessened, and he covered her gently, turned out the light, and got in bed beside her."
Author: John Edward Williams
25. "In her white dress she was like a cold light coming into the room. Stoner started involuntarily toward her and felt Finch's hand on his arm, restraining him. Edith was pale, but she gave him a small smile. Then she was beside him, and they were walking together. A stranger with a round collar stood before them; he was short and fat and he had a vague face. He was mumbling words and looking at a white book in his hands. William heard himself responding to silences. He felt Edith trembling beside him.Then there was a long silence, and another murmur, and the sound of laughter. Someone said, "Kiss the bride!"
Author: John Edward Williams
26. "For Jefferson, William and Mary was largely about what university life is supposed to be about: reading books, enjoying the company of like-minded, and savoring teachers who seemed to be ambassadors from other, richer, writer worlds. Jefferson believed Williamsburg "the finest school of manners and morals that ever existed in America."
Author: Jon Meacham
27. "I sit every once in a while and I think about plays and films I can do with William Petersen into our eighties. He's the most incredible scene partner I've ever had."
Author: Jorja Fox
28. "The church's teaching on marriage is unequivocal, it is uniquely, the union of a man and a woman and it is wrong that governments, politicians or parliaments should seek to alter or destroy that reality."
Author: Keith O'Brien
29. "Here's the news: I am going to sue the Brown & Williamson Tobacco Company, manufacturers of Pall Mall cigarettes, for a billion bucks! Starting when I was only twelve years old, I have never chain-smoked anything but unfiltered Pall Malls. And for many years now, right on the package, Brown & Williamson have promised to kill me. But I am eighty-two. Thanks a lot, you dirty rats. The last thing I ever wanted was to be alive when the three most powerful people on the whole planet would be named Bush, Dick and Colon."
Author: Kurt Vonnegut
30. "Quiet had a roof and it had walls around it, and you could sit inside it. She had never thought of silence as a place.One of the friends, Tom Williams told her,'the place is in your heart, Louise. Everything else is just clutter."
Author: Lloyd Jones
31. "Viola De Lesseps: You have never spoken so well of him before.William Shakespeare: He was not dead before."
Author: Marc Norman
32. "...she studied his clothes, his top hat. "And you've just come from Parliament? How are you finding that?""It's much like piracy. You tell your enemies that if they don't fall in line, you'll leave them to die."
Author: Meljean Brook
33. "I feel that I'm leaving Williamstown too early, but I'd rather leave too early than too late."
Author: Michael Ritchie
34. "And Prometheus was flying directly toward them.William Shakespeare shifted uncomfortably in his seat. "Now, I've never been a warrior,and I know little about tactics,but shouldn't we be flying in the other direction?" They were close enough now to see the wide-eyed anpu in the nearest craft."We will," Prometheus said. "Just as soon as the missiles explode.""Which missiles?" Shakespeare asked."The two just behind us."
Author: Michael Scott
35. "Non si è mai posta quelle domande che torturano le coppie umane: mi ama? ha mai amato qualcuna più di me? mi ama più di quanto lo ami io? Forse tutte queste domande rivolte all'amore, che lo misurano, lo indagano, lo esaminano, lo sottopongono a interrogatorio, riescono anche a distruggerlo sul nascere. Forse non siamo capaci di amare proprio perchè desideriamo essere amati, vale a dire vogliamo qualcosa (l'amore) dall'altro invece di avvicinarci a lui senza pretese e volere solo la sua semplice presenza."
Author: Milan Kundera
36. "Unless you are as smart as Johann Karl Friedrich Gauss, savvy as a half-blind Calcutta bootblack, tough as General William Tecumseh Sherman, rich as the Queen of England, emotionally resilient as a Red Sox fan, and as generally able to take care of yourself as the average nuclear missile submarine commander, you should never have been allowed near this document."
Author: Neal Stephenson
37. "And what are we saying, anyway? That only old money is allowed to buy success? Isn't that a little like telling Noel and Liam Gallagher that they aren't allowed to make anything of themselves because they didn't go to Eton?"
Author: Nick Hornby
38. "Bismarck had cunningly taught the parties not to aim at national appeal but to represent interests. They remained class or sectional pressure-groups under the Republic. This was fatal, for it made the party system, and with it democratic parliamentarianism, seem a divisive rather than a unifying factor. Worse: it meant the parties never produced a leader who appealed beyond the narrow limits of his own following."
Author: Paul Johnson
39. "The parking lot is hidden by thickets of scrub and at a field's distance from the mission compound. Yes, you can imagine the solitude of the landscape; you can imagine the hardness of the life. Perhaps I was expecting too much. La Purísima reminds me of nothing so much as those churches the Soviet government used to ridicule by making of them shrines to history. La Purísima is Williamsburg and Sutter's Fort and worse. The state's [California's] insistence that here are matters only of fact is depressing, the triumph of history over memory."
Author: Richard Rodriguez
40. "Again like Williams, with the emphasis now regrettable, when a man makes a poem, makes it mind you, he takes the words as he finds them lying interrelated about him."
Author: Robert Creeley
41. "In The Bloudy Tenent, Williams points out that Constantine "did more to hurt Christ Jesus than the raging fury of the most bloody Neroes." at least under the Christian persecutor Nero, who was rumored to have had the Apostle Paul beheaded and Saint Peter crucified upside down, Christianity was a pure (if hazardous) way of life. But when Constantine himself converted to Christianity, that's when the Church was corrupted and perverted by the state. Williams explains that under Constantine, "the gardens of Christ's churches turned into the wildernesss of national religion, and the world (under Constantine's dominion) to the most unchristian Christendom." Legalizing, legitimizing the Church turned Christianity into just another branch of government enforced by "the sword of civil power," i.e., through state-sponsored violence."
Author: Sarah Vowell
42. "I don't think you'd call me a traditionalist. But you can say I have an old soul, because I grew up listening to Conway Twitty and Hank Williams."
Author: Scotty McCreery
43. "Cuando la vida te ofrece un sueño que supera ampliamente cualquiera de tus expectativas, no es razonable lamentarse de su conclusión."
Author: Stephenie Meyer
44. "I don't like institutions that are beyond normal parliamentary scrutiny. It's an invitation to abuse of power, no matter how noble the intentions."
Author: Stieg Larsson
45. "My plays are for the kind of black people who relate to funk music, to Parliament-Funkadelic. When those guys get out of a spaceship - the idea that black people are from outer space, there's a poetic truth to that. We are this vast people."
Author: Suzan Lori Parks
46. "Are you staying with us? It could be dangerous,' said William, realizing that he was saying this to a vampire iconographer who undied every time he took a picture."
Author: Terry Pratchett
47. "You know zat another term for an iconographer would be ‘photographer'? From the old word ‘photus' in Latation, vhich means—""‘To prance around like an idiot ordering everyone about as if you owned the place,'" said William."Ah, you know it!"
Author: Terry Pratchett
48. "Nobody wanted to hear about all the Preterite, the many God passes over when he chooses a few for salvation. William argued holiness for these "second Sheep," without whom there'd be no elect. You can bet the Elect in Boston were pissed off about that. And it got worse. William felt that what Jesus was for the elect, Judas Iscariot was for the Preterite. Everything in the Creation has its equal and opposite counterpart. How can Jesus be an exception? could we feel for him anything but horror in the face of the unnatural, the extracreational? Well, if he is the son of man, and if what we feel is not horror but love, then we have to love Judas too. Right? How William avoided being burned for heresy, nobody knows."
Author: Thomas Pynchon
49. "To be or not to be tethered to the sordid, sickly, stinking, sappy apron strings of Hollywood and its endless fondness for fu**ing your sh** up. If Shakespeare were alive today, I bet he'd write a scintillating soliloquy about the Broken Brood of Big Shots. I bet he'd help you out, Micky Affias, ol' Will the Bard would. Listen, we'll come visit you. Okay? I'll dress up as William Shakespeare, Lucent as Emily Dickinson, and beautiful ‘Ray' as someone dashing and manly like Jules Verne or Ernest Hemingway, and we'll write on your white-room walls. We'll write you out of your supposed insanity. I love you, Micky Affias.-James (from "Descendants of the Eminent")"
Author: Tim Cummings
50. "I expect you (William Whitelaw) were as impressed as I was to read of the recent electrocution in Florida of a character called John Spenkelink in the electric chair. It seems that a full six minutes passed before Spenkelink was dead, during which time he hopped about like a prawn on a hot plate."
Author: William Donaldson

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I enjoy Augusta. I enjoy its challenges. There's no other golf course like this anywhere. Its greens and its challenges on and around the greens are just super, super tough. So the greens are fun to play in sort of a morbid way."
Author: Ben Crenshaw

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