Top Naissance Quotes

Browse top 124 famous quotes and sayings about Naissance by most favorite authors.

Favorite Naissance Quotes

1. "...he was one of the great intellectuals of the 1940s who completedtheir higher studies in the West and returned to their country toapply what they had learned there—lock, stock, and barrel—withinEgyptian academia. For people like them, "progress" and "the West"were virtually synonymous, with all that that entailed by way of positiveand negative behavior. They all had the same reverence for thegreat Western values—democracy, freedom, justice, hard work, andequality. At the same time, they had the same ignorance of the nation'sheritage and contempt for its customs and traditions, which they consideredshackles pulling us toward Backwardness from which it wasour duty to free ourselves so that the Renaissance could be achieved."
Author: Alaa Al Aswany
2. "Une manière commode de faire la connaissance d'une ville est de chercher comment on y travaille, comment on y aime et comment on y meurt."
Author: Albert Camus
3. "On the way from the Renaissance to our days we have enriched our experience, but we have lost the concept of a Supreme Complete Entity which used to restrain our passions and our irresponsibility. We have placed too much hope in political and social reforms, only to find out that we were being deprived of our most precious possession: our spiritual life. In the East, it is destroyed by the dealings and machinations of the ruling party. In the West, commercial interests tend to suffocate it. This is the real crisis."
Author: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
4. "The Renaissance is studded by the names of the artists and architects, with their creations recorded as great historical events."
Author: Arthur Erickson
5. "The word Renaissance helps to impose a factitious unity on all the untidy and heterogeneous events which are going on in those centuries as in any others. Thus the "imaginary entity" creeps in. Renaissance becomes the name for some character or quality supposed to be immanent in all events, and collects very serious emotional overtones in the process. Then as every attempt to define this mysterious character or quality turns out to uncover all sorts of things that were there before the chosen period, a curious procedure is adopted. Instead of admitting that our definition has broken down, we adopt the desperate expedient that "the Renaissance" must have begun earlier than we had thought. (55)"
Author: C.S. Lewis
6. "L'homme a un penchant naturel à imaginer des théories correctes de toutes espèces... Si l'homme n'était pas doué d'un esprit adapté à ses besoins, il n'aurait jamais pu acquérir aucune connaissance"
Author: Charles S. Peirce
7. "And so Cristina submerged her ears beneath the water and the world grew a little quieter; her hair fanned out atop the plane and she ran her fingers through it and was reminded of a goddess in a Renaissance painting. Her mind wandered far from the villa and the ruins and her unshakable sense that her world was about to change."
Author: Chris Bohjalian
8. "Every last minute of my life has been preordained and I'm sick and tired of it.How this feels is I'm just another task in God's daily planner: the Italian Renaissance penciled in for right after the Dark Ages....The Information Age is scheduled immediately after the Industrial Revolution. Then the Postmodern Era, then the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Famine. Check. Pestilence. Check. War. Check. Death. Check. And between the big events, the earthquakes and the tidal waves, God's got me squeezed in for a cameo appearance. Then maybe in thirty years, or maybe next year, God's daily planner has me finished."
Author: Chuck Palahniuk
9. "I imagine it was much different in the 1970s. That was the Renaissance for black actors, albeit in blaxploitation movies. There was a much greater preponderance of work then than there is now."
Author: Don Cheadle
10. "Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal."
Author: E. O. Wilson
11. "Until the June 1967 war I was completely caught up in the life of a young professor of English. Beginning in 1968, I started to think, write, and travel as someone who felt himself to be directly involved in the renaissance of Palestinian life and politics."
Author: Edward Said
12. "Like Molière's M. Jourdain, who spoke prose all his life without knowing it, mathematicians have been reasoning for at least two millennia without being aware of all the principles underlying what they were doing. The real nature of the tools of their craft has become evident only within recent times A renaissance of logical studies in modern times begins with the publication in 1847 of George Boole's 'The Mathematical Analysis of Logic'."
Author: Ernest Nagel
13. "Les cinq degrés de l'amour****** Les Sufis sont les grands maîtres de l'art d'aimer de la civilisation musulmane. Selon Ad-Daylami, l'amour est une fulgurante source de lumière et " celui qui aime est éclairé dans son génie et illuminé dans sa nature". Cependant, tot amour n'est pas équivalent: " L'amour dont s'aiment entre eux les humains est de cinq espèces pour cinq catégories différentes [ d'hommes]:- Un amour divin pour ceux qui sont parvenus à l'unité.- Un amour intellectuel pour ceux qui possèdent la connaissance.- Un amour spirituel pour l'élite des hommes.- Un amour naturel pour la masse des humains.- Un amour bestial pour les natures abjectes"."
Author: Fatema Mernissi
14. "C'était un de ces hommes politiques à plusieurs faces, sans convictions, sans grands moyens, sans audace et sans connaissance sérieuse, avocat de province, joli homme de chef-lieu, gardant un équilibre de finaud entre tous les partis extrêmes, sorte de jésuite républicain et de champignon libéral de nature douteuse, comme il en pousse par centaines sur le fumier populaire du suffrage universel.Son machiavélisme de village le faisait passer pour fort parmi ses collègues, parmi tous les déclassés et les avortés dont on fait les députés. Il était assez soigné, assez correct, assez familier, assez aimable pour réussir. (…) On disait partout de lui « Laroche sera ministre », et il pensait aussi plus fermement que tous les autres que Laroche serait ministre."
Author: Guy De Maupassant
15. "Take your time.Stay away from the easy going.Never take the same way twice.Gunny Arndt's rules for successful reconnaissance; Guadalcanal 1942"
Author: GYSGT Charles C. Arndt
16. "In his Dialogue "Timaeus" Plato had a demiurge to create the globe-shaped world according to musical laws, including the human soul. Fifteen hundred years later, that still found an echo in the Renaissance. And in those days the architects realized that the musical harmonies had spatial expressions -- namely, the relationships of the length of strings, and spatial relationships were precisely their only concerns. Because both the world and the body and soul were composed according to musical harmonies by the demiurge architect, both the macrocosm and the microcosm, they must therefore be guided in their own architectural designs by the laws of music."
Author: Harry Mulisch
17. "Le seul chemin qui mène à la délivrance passe par la découverte et la reconnaissance du caractère unique de son identité."
Author: Henry Miller
18. "Jimmie would forever be the Renaissance humanist, bearing his faith and optimism like a white light inside a chalice."
Author: James Lee Burke
19. "What these critics forget is that printing presses in themselves provide no guarantee of an enlightened outcome. People, not machines, made the Renaissance. The printing that takes place in North Korea today, for instance, is nothing more than propaganda for a personality cult. What is important about printing presses is not the mechanism, but the authors."
Author: Jaron Lanier
20. "Maybe it's time to go back 2,000 years for a spiritual renaissance. If not, our days may be numbered and a terrible implosion is coming. There is no more middle ground. It is one or the other."
Author: Joel C. Rosenberg
21. "I suspect that beneath your offensively and vulgarly effeminate façade there may be a soul of sorts. Have you read widely in Boethius?""Who? Oh, heavens no. I never even read newspapers.""Then you must begin a reading program immediately so that you may understand the crises of our age," Ignatius said solemnly. "Begin with the late Romans, including Boethius, of course. Then you should dip rather extensively into early Medieval. You may skip the Renaissance and the Enlightenment. That is mostly dangerous propaganda. Now that I think of it, you had better skip the Romantics and the Victorians, too. For the contemporary period, you should study some selected comic books.""You're fantastic.""I recommend Batman especially, for he tends to transcend the abysmal society in which he's found himself. His morality is rather rigid, also. I rather respect Batman."
Author: John Kennedy Toole
22. "Time spent in reconnaissance is seldom wasted."
Author: John Marsden
23. "I have sieged many a castle in my day, m'lady, but my attack on your keep will be the sweetest of all."She giggled as I kissed every inch of her face. "Oh, we're doing medieval now? Okay, I can do that. I've been to a Renaissance Faire. Avast ye varlet! No quarter!""That was piratical, dearling, but we'll go with it if you like. Lower your gangplanks and prepare to be boarded!"-Dane and Megan (Stag Party)"
Author: Katie MacAlister
24. "If I could have picked an era to have lived, I think I would've loved to have been one of Louis XIV's mistresses. They were so fantastic and aristocratic, and they had so much power. And he was such a renaissance man. I think I would've fit into that nicely."
Author: Katie McGrath
25. "In the early twelfth century century the Virgin had been the supreme protectress of civilisation. She had taught a race of tough and ruthless barbarians the virtues of tenderness and compassion. The great cathedrals of the Middle Ages were her dwelling places upon earth. In the Renaissance, while remaining the Queen of Heaven, she became also the human mother in whom everyone could recognise qualities of warmth and love and approachability...The stabilising, comprehensive religions of the world, the religions which penetrate to every part of a man's being--in Egypt, India or China--gave the female principle of creation at least as much importance as the male, and wouldn't have taken seriously a philosophy that failed to include them both...It's a curious fact that theall-male religions have produced no religious imagery--in most cases have positively forbidden it. The great religious art of the world is deeply involved with the female principle."
Author: Kenneth Clark
26. "Atop a Ferris wheel, Orson Welles told Joseph Cotten how Italy's thirty years of war and terror and bloodshed had produced the Renaissance and Michelangelo, and how Switzerland's five hundred years of democracy and peace had produced, goddamn, only the cuckoo clock."
Author: Kevin Wilson
27. "Comic books, movies, radio programmes centered their entertainment around the fact of torture. With the clearest of consciences, with a patriotic intensity, children dreamed, talked, acted orgies of physical abuse. Imaginations were released to wander on a reconnaissance mission from Cavalry to Dachau. European children starved and watched their parents scheme and die. Here we grew up with toy whips. Early warning against our future leaders, the war babies."
Author: Leonard Cohen
28. "Le véritable lieu de naissance est celui où l'on a porté pour la première fois un coup d'oeil intelligent sur soi-même: mes premières patries ont été des livres."
Author: Marguerite Yourcenar
29. "Architecture traditionally has been the slowest of art forms. It was not unusual for great cathedrals to take centuries to complete, with stylistic changes from Romanesque to Gothic or Renaissance to Baroque as common as the addition of chapels or spires. But because the function remained the same, the form could be flexible and its growth organic."
Author: Martin Filler
30. "Pourquoi respecterais-je l'être humain quand il me méprise ? Qu'il vive donc en harmonie avec moi. S'il y consentait, loin de lui nuire, je lui ferais tout le bien possible, et c'est avec des larmes de joie que je lui témoignerais ma reconnaissance. Mais cela ne peut être. Les sentiments des humains de dressent comme une barrière pour empêcher un tel accord. Jamais pourtant je ne me soumettrai à un aussi abject esclavage. Je me vengerai du tord que l'on me fait. Si je ne puis inspirer l'amour, eh bien, j'infligerai la peur, et cela principalement à vous, mon ennemi par ecellence. Parce que vous êtes mon créateur, je jure de vous exécrer à jamais. Prenez garde ! Je me consacrerai à votre destruction, et je ne serai satisfait que lorsque j'aurai plongé votre coeur dans la désolation, lorsque je vous aurai fait maudire le jour où vous êtes né."
Author: Mary Shelley
31. "While nothing is certain, I firmly believe our nation is on the verge of a nuclear energy renaissance."
Author: Michael K. Simpson
32. "Beauty in the European sense has always had a premeditated quality to it. We've always had an aesthetic intention and a long-range plan. That's what enabled western man to spend decades building a Gothic cathedral or a Renaissance piazza. The beauty of New York rests on a completely different base. It's unintentional. It arose independent of human designt, like a stalagmitic cavern. Forms which in themselves quite ugly turn up fortuitously, without design, in such incredible surroundings that they sparkle with with a sudden wondrous poetry...Sabina was very much attracted by the alien quality of New York's beauty. Fran found it intriguing but frightening; it made him feel homesick for Europe."
Author: Milan Kundera
33. "Phidias and the achievements of Greek art are foreshadowed in Homer: Dante prefigures for us the passion and colour and intensity of Italian painting: the modern love of landscape dates from Rousseau, and it is in Keats that one discerns the beginning of the artistic renaissance of England. Byron was a rebel and Shelley a dreamer; but in the calmness and clearness of his vision, his perfect self-control, his unerring sense of beauty and his recognition of a separate realm for the imagination, Keats was the pure and serene artist, the forerunner of the pre-Raphaelite school, and so of the great romantic movement of which I am to speak."
Author: Oscar Wilde
34. "After I'd been in college for a couple years I'd read Shakespeare and Frost and Chaucer and the poets of the Harlem Renaissance. I'd come to appreciate how gorgeous the English language could be. But most fantasy novels didn't seem to make the effort."
Author: Patrick Rothfuss
35. "Le point final du processus dialectique represente l'esprit qui se reconnait comme l'ultime realite, et realise que tout ce qu'il a considere jusqu'alors comme etranger et hostile a lui-meme,en verite, en fait partie integrante. Il s'agit simultanement d'un etat de connaissance absolue ou l'esprit s'identifie enfin comme etant l'ultime realite, mais aussi un etat de liberte totale dans lequel l'esprit, au lieu d'etre controlee par des forces exterieures, est capable d'organiser le monde d'une facon rationnelle. Il prend alors conscience que le monde est en fait lui-meme, et qu'il lui suffit simplement de mettre en oeuvre ses propres principes de rationalite afin de l'organizer rationalement."
Author: Peter Singer
36. "This much should be clear by now: the term 'renaissance' can only remain fruitful and demanding as long as it refers to a far-reaching idea: that it is the fate of Europeans to develop life and forms of life according to and alongside the Christian definitions of life and forms of life."
Author: Peter Sloterdijk
37. "J'ai tant rêvé de toi que tu perds ta réalité.Est-il encore temps d'atteindre ce corps vivant et de baiser sur cette bouche la naissance de la voix quim'est chère?J'ai tant rêvé de toi que mes bras habitués en étreignant ton ombre à se croiser sur ma poitrine ne seplieraient pas au contour de ton corps, peut-être.Et que, devant l'apparence réelle de ce qui me hante et me gouverne depuis des jours et des années, jedeviendrais une ombre sans doute. O balances sentimentales."
Author: Robert Desnos
38. "John Milton has, since his own lifetime, always been one of the major figures in English literature, but his reputation has changed constantly. He has been seen as a political opportunist, an advocate of 'immorality' (he wrote in favour of divorce and married three times), an over-serious classicist, and an arrogant believer in his own greatness as a poet. He was all these things. But, above all, Milton's was the last great liberal intelligence of the English Renaissance. The values expressed in all his works are the values of tolerance, freedom and self-determination, expressed by Shakespeare, Hooker and Donne. The basis of his aesthetic studies was classical, but the modernity of his intellectual interests can be seen in the fact that he went to Italy (in the late 1630s) where he met the astronomer Galileo, who had been condemned as a heretic by the Catholic church for saying the earth moved around the sun."
Author: Ronald Carter
39. "At the end of the 1400s, the world changed. Two key dates can mark the beginning of modern times. In 1485, the Wars of the Roses came to an end, and, following the invention of printing, William Caxton issued the first imaginative book to be published in England - Sir Thomas Malory's retelling of the Arthurian legends as Le Morte D'Arthur. In 1492, Christopher Columbus's voyage to the Americas opened European eyes to the existence of the New World. New worlds, both geographical and spiritual, are the key to the Renaissance, the 'rebirth' of learning and culture, which reached its peak in Italy in the early sixteenth century and in Britain during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, from 1558 to 1603."
Author: Ronald Carter
40. "Pearl introduces an original story, in a form which was to become one of the most frequent in mediaeval literature, the dream-vision. Authors like Chaucer and Langland use this form, in which the narrator describes another world - usually a heavenly paradise - which is compared with the earthly human world. In Pearl, the narrator sees his daughter who died in infancy, 'the ground of all my bliss'. She now has a kind of perfect knowledge, which her father can never comprehend. The whole poem underlines the divide between human comprehension and perfection; these lines show the gap between possible perfection and fallen humanity which, thematically, anticipate many literary examinations of man's fall, the most well known being Milton's late Renaissance epic, Paradise Lost."
Author: Ronald Carter
41. "The beliefs and behaviour of the Restoration reflect the theories of society put forward by Thomas Hobbes in The Leviathan, which was written in exile in Paris and published in 1651. Like many texts of the time, The Leviathan is an allegory. It recalls mediaeval rather than Renaissance thinking. The leviathan is the Commonwealth, society as a total organism, in which the individual is the absolute subject of state control, represented by the monarch. Man - motivated by self-interest - is acquisitive and lacks codes of behaviour. Hence the necessity for a strong controlling state, 'an artificial man', to keep discord at bay. Self-interest and stability become the keynotes of British society after 1660, the voice of the new middle-class bourgeoisie making itself heard more and more in the expression of values, ideals, and ethics."
Author: Ronald Carter
42. "But it has been a long process because I'm kind of a renaissance person."
Author: Ronnie Montrose
43. "From the Renaissance until today, Christianity, and also to some extent Judaism, in the West have had to carry out a constant battle against ideologies, philosophies, institutions and practices which are secular in nature and which challenge the authority of religion and in fact its very validity and legitimacy. These challenges to religion have varied from political ideas which are based on secularism to the denial of the religious foundation of morality and the philosophical denial of the reality of God and of the after life or of revelation and sacred scripture. The history of the West has been marked during the last few centuries by a constant battle between the forces of religion and secularism and in fact the gaining of the upper hand by secularism and consequently the denial of the reality of religion and its pertinence to various domains of life."
Author: Seyyed Hossein Nasr
44. "What we need in America is a renaissance. We need to go forward by going backward."
Author: Stanley Crouch
45. "I went to a restaurant that serves 'breakfast at any time'. So I ordered French Toast during the Renaissance."
Author: Steven Wright
46. "La recherche d'une réalité communautaire prend la forme d'une opération de sauvetage massive. J'estime que c'est la grande aventure de notre temps, infiniment plus valable pour l'homme que la conquête de l'espace. Elle représente le retour et le renouveau de l'ancienne gnose. Pour ceux qui répondent à l'appel, ce qui se passe dans le monde des sciences, malgré sa place encore considérable dans le politique gouvernementales, perdra de plus en plus son sens existentiel. À leurs yeux, les scientifiques et leurs nombreux émoules feront figure de clergé archaïque, à la liturgie professionnelle absurde, occupé à échanger ses connaissances, soi-disant à la disposition du public, dans le sanctuaire secret de leur église de l'État."
Author: Theodore Roszak
47. "There were no mail-order catalogues in 1492. Marco Polo's journal was the wish book of Renaissance Europe. Then, Columbus sailed the ocean blue and landed in Sears' basement. Despite all the Indians on the escalator, Columbus' visit came to be known as a "discovery."
Author: Tom Robbins
48. "A glorious place, a glorious age, I tell you! A very Neon renaissance - And the myths that actually touched you at that time - not Hercules, Orpheus, Ulysses and Aeneas - but Superman, Captain Marvel, and Batman."
Author: Tom Wolfe
49. "Since the Renaissance, Shakespeare, Rembrandt, Mozart, and a host of others have shown that this religious dimension can be experienced and communicated apart from any religious context. But that is no reason for closing my heart to Job's cry, or to Jeremiah's, or to the Second Isaiah. I do not read them as mere literature; rather, I read Sophocles and Shakespeare with all my being, too."
Author: Walter Kaufmann
50. "...the pride taken by the Italians in their gifted women is among the most important facts in the history of their Renaissance."
Author: Walter Shaw Sparrow

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I think I learned most from editing, both editing myself and having someone else edit me. It's not always easy to have someone criticize your work, your baby. But if you can swallow your ego, you can really learn from the editing."
Author: Christopher Paolini

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