Top Newsweek Quotes

Browse top 20 famous quotes and sayings about Newsweek by most favorite authors.

Favorite Newsweek Quotes

1. "Even beyond the Middle East, the role of the independent women remains as warped as a Lewis Caroll novel. We may control $12 trillion of the world's $184 trillion in annual consumer spending (I read it in Newsweek), and yet our self-worth apparently ccomes in a shampoo bottle ("because you're worth it")."
Author: Amy Mowafi
2. "Reading is not simply an intellectual pursuit but an emotional and spiritual one. It lights the candle in the hurricane lamp of self; that's why it survives."[Turning the Page: The future of reading is backlit and bright, Newsweek Magazine, March 25, 2010]"
Author: Anna Quindlen
3. "It's hard to get into Newsweek because, as more of our former intellectual magazines take on a pop focus, if there's no buzz, there's no interest."
Author: Branford Marsalis
4. "I pick up a copy of Newsweek on the plane and immediately notice how biased, slanted, and opinionated all the U.S. newsmagazine articles are. Not that the Euro and British press aren't biased as well--they certainly are--but living in the United States we are led to believe, and are constantly reminded, that our press is fair and free of bias. After such a short time away, I am shocked at how obviously and blatantly this lie is revealed--there is the 'reporting' that is essentially parroting what the White House press secretary announces; the myriad built-in assumptions that one ceases to register after being somewhere else for a while. The myth of neutrality is an effective blanket for a host of biases."
Author: David Byrne
5. "In this age of 24-7 headlines, the term 'newsweekly' seems almost quaint."
Author: Graydon Carter
6. "And we also read Newsweek, Time and several newspapers."
Author: Hanoi Hannah
7. "To a thoughtful biographer, [Ebling Mis's house] was "the symbolization of a retreat from a non-academic reality", a society columnist gushed silkily at its "frightfully masculine atmosphere of careless disorder", a University Ph.D called it brusquely, "bookish, but unorganized", a non-university friend said, "good for a drink anytime and you can put your feet on the sofa", and a breezy newsweekly broadcast, that went in for color, spoke of the "rooky, down-to-earth, no-nonsense living quarters of blaspheming, Leftish, balding Ebling Mis". To Bayta, who thought of no audience but herself at the moment, and who had the advantage of first-hand information, it was merely sloppy."
Author: Isaac Asimov
8. "I read the 'New York Times', I read 'The Nation', I read 'Newsweek', I read 'Time Magazine', I read 'Politico', I read 'Mediaite'. This is what I do! I read every day, I have interests, I'm like everybody out there who's watching, who's out there watching, you know?"
Author: Joy Behar
9. "...at Newsweek only girls with college degrees--and we were called "girls" then--were hired to sort and deliver the mail, humbly pushing our carts from door to door in our ladylike frocks and proper high-heeled shoes. If we could manage that, we graduated to "clippers," another female ghetto. Dressed in drab khaki smocks so that ink wouldn't smudge our clothes, we sat at the clip desk, marked up newspapers, tore out releveant articles with razor-edged "rip sticks," and routed the clips to the appropriate departments. "Being a clipper was a horrible job," said writer and director Nora Ephron, who got a job at Newsweek after she graduated from Wellesley in 1962, "and to make matters worse, I was good at it."
Author: Lynn Povich
10. "In early 1970, Newsweek's editors decided that the new women's liberation movement deserved a cover story. There was one problem, however: there were no women to write the piece."
Author: Lynn Povich
11. "Newsweek never hired women as writers and only one or two female staffers were promoted to that rank no matter how talented they were...Any aspiring journalist who was interviewed for a job was told, "If you want to be a writer, go somewhere else--women don't write at Newsweek."
Author: Lynn Povich
12. "There were elements of Mad Men at Newsweek, except that unlike the natty advertising types, journalists were notorious slobs and our two- and three-martini lunches were out of the office, not in...Kevin Buckley, who was hired in 1963, described the Newsweek of the early 1960s as similar to an old movie, with the wisecracking private eye and his Girl Friday. "The 'hubba-hubba' climate was tolerated," he recalled. "I was told the editors would ask the girls to do handstands on their desk. Was there rancor? Yes. But in this climate, a laugh would follow."
Author: Lynn Povich
13. "When Newsweek owner Katharine Graham heard about our lawsuit, she asked, "Which side am I supposed to be on?"
Author: Lynn Povich
14. "I think the bottom line for me and for Newsweek is that there were a lot of - we did retract this specific matter about the Koran and the toilet for the reasons that you just cited."
Author: Michael Isikoff
15. "Look, obviously that was - created quite a firestorm, but Newsweek editors have made clear that this was a situation where, you know, a solid, well-placed source provided some information."
Author: Michael Isikoff
16. "I read 'Time', 'Newsweek' and 'The Economist'."
Author: Nelson DeMille
17. "Men who work at Time have a life expectancy which is not long said the young man from Newsweek"
Author: Norman Mailer
18. "Not even the most powerful organs of the press, including Time, Newsweek, and The New York Times, can discover a new artist or certify his work and make it stick. They can only bring you the scores."
Author: Thomas Wolfe
19. "On the front cover of Newsweek reviews "A House for Mr. Biswas" as "a marvelous prose epic that matches the best 19th century novels for richness of comic insight and final, tragic power."
Author: V.S. Naipaul
20. "I will say I remember the best thing in terms of publicity was being on the cover of Newsweek."
Author: Vanna White

Newsweek Quotes Pictures

Quotes About Newsweek
Quotes About Newsweek
Quotes About Newsweek

Today's Quote

La distraction a le même effet que la censure sans être coercitive. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'interdire les livres pour qu'ils ne soient pas lu; il suffit de fournir les distractions qui détournent des livres (TV, sports, drogues, etc.) Le martèlement constant de la publicité/propagande nuit à la réflection individuelle et au développement du sens critique et fait accepter les conceptions et modèles du bonheur suggéré, largement basé sur une consommation toujours plus importantes.(Le meilleur des mondes / Brave New World)"
Author: Aldous Huxley

Famous Authors

Popular Topics