Top Philippa Quotes

Browse top 25 famous quotes and sayings about Philippa by most favorite authors.

Favorite Philippa Quotes

1. "There scotsmen must have arses like leather,for while he ate I could see naught beneath his kilts but a pair of rather large balls ," the secretary told him . - philippa"
Author: Bertrice Small
2. "Lion-hearted; her tremors braced with virtue, Philippa trotted on."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
3. "It won't be long,' said Philippa cheerfully, her mother's ring in her voice. ‘You know what Bess says. There's nothing in this world a drop of aqua-vitæ in a sheep's bladder won't cure. Stop the Somervilles with a knife! It needs artillery.' And she blew her nose hard."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
4. "No, Mr Crawford!' cried Philippa forbiddingly, and ducking under the snatching arms that tried to prevent her, she ran forward. ‘No! What harm can Sir Graham do now? What might the little boy become?' And sinking on her knees, she shook, in her vehemence, Lymond's bloodstained arm. ‘You castigate the Kerrs and the Scotts and the others, but what is this but useless vengeance? He can do us no harm; he can do Scotland no harm; he can do Malta no harm. There is a baby!' said Philippa, very loudly and insistently and desperately, as if Lymond could not hear her, or were too tired or too simple to understand. ‘There is a baby. You can't abandon your son!"
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
5. "Lymond said quietly, ‘You had good reason to hate me. I always understood that. I don't know why you should think differently now, but take care. Don't build up another false image. I may be the picturesque sufferer now, but when I have the whip-hold, I shall behave quite as crudely, or worse. I have no pretty faults. Only, sometimes, a purpose.' He paused, and said, ‘Est conformis precedenti. I owe the Somervilles rather a lot already.' Philippa's unwinking brown gaze flickered shiftily at the Latin and then steadied. 'I should have told you before. You don't mind?' ‘If you had told me before, you might not have decided to have me for a friend. I don't mind,' said Francis Crawford and told, for once, the bare truth."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
6. "Moving forward quietly to Jerott's side, Adam Blacklock had heard. ‘Don't you understand? The authorities are afraid of them both,' he said gently. ‘Why do you supose this cordon is here, which only an unarmed girl was allowed to pass through? Lymond, loyal to Scotland, might be a threat to French power greater than even Gabriel, one of these days—Philippa!' And a wordless shout, like a cry at a cockfight, rose among the stone pillars and sank muffled into the old, dusty banners above the choir roof. For Philippa Somerville, who believed in action when words were not enough, had leaned over and snatched the knife from Lymond's left hand."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
7. "And, echoing Jerott, ‘So why in hell have you come?' Philippa's gaze, bright and owlish and obstinate, held his to the end. ‘To look after the baby,' she answered. And disconcertingly, after a second's blank pause, Francis Crawford flung back his damp head and laughed."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
8. "Jerott's hand increased its grip on her arm. ‘He is an island with all its bridges wantonly severed. What hostage to evil,' said Jerott, poetic in his thumping displeasure, ‘will this night's business conceive?' ‘I don't know. But they're both nice and clean, if that's anything,' said Philippa. And led the way philosophically down."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
9. "Standing safely on the opposite bank with her dry maid, her dry escort, and a company of streaming horsemen, Philippa said scathingly, ‘That's men for you. Cover the lady's retreat, the book says. A hundred years ago, maybe. And what stopped you from coming with me just now? I can swim, you know."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
10. "It seems to me,' said Philippa prosaically, ‘that on the whole we run more risks with Mr Crawford's protection than without it."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
11. "Philippa Somerville, standing back a little, did not withdraw her arm. In her white face, a shadow of motherly irritation appeared. ‘Has no one here any sense? Be quiet and sit down. The world will look after itself for a night, without your hand on the rim."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
12. "Philippa, enviously, wished she could do the same, and then decided she would rather be interesting and sensitive."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
13. "This time, after a moment, he called her bluff. "Perhaps Philippa and I should be thrown together a little more. She might become attached to me if she knew me better." Kate, brightening visibly, ignored the gleam in his eye. "That would make her sorry for you?" "It might. The object of any sort of clinical study deserves compassion, don't you think?" "Snakes don't," said Katherine inconsequently. "I hate snakes." "And yet you feed them on honey cakes and forbid them to defend themselves." "Defencelessness is not a noted characteristic of serpents. Anyhow, I can't have them lying rattling about the house. It gets on the nerves." "It does if you handle it by rattling back."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
14. "Jerott's eyes and Philippa's met. ‘When I meet my friend,' said Jerott Blyth carefully, ‘there is likely to be a detonation which will take the snow off Mont Blanc. I advise you to seek other auspices. Philippa, I think we should go down below.' ‘To swim?' said that unprepossessing child guilelessly. ‘I can stand on my head.' ‘Oh, Christ,' said Jerott morosely. ‘Why in hell did you come?' The brown eyes within the damp, dun-coloured hair inspected him narrowly. ‘Because you need a woman,' said Philippa finally. ‘And I'm the nearest thing to it that you're likely to get. It was very short notice."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
15. "So: ‘Why did you laugh?' demanded Philippa, and shook Jerott's hand off her arm. ‘Oh, that?' said Lymond. ‘But, my dear child, the picture was irresistible. Daddy, afflicted but purposeful, ransacking the souks of the Levant for one of his bastards, with an unchaperoned North Country schoolgirl aged—what? twelve? thirteen?—to help change its napkins when the happy meeting takes place.… A gallant thought, Philippa,' said Lymond kindly, sitting down at the table. ‘And a touching faith in mankind. But truly, all the grown-up ladies and gentlemen would laugh themselves into bloody fluxes over the spectacle. Have some whatever-it-is."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
16. "O England,' said Kiaya Khátún. Her voice, mellow and strong, held an accent or a mingling of accents Philippa was unable to name. ‘O England, the Hell of Horses, the Purgatory of Servants and the Paradise of Women.' She turned her splendid eyes on the soothsayer. ‘She will be like Avicenna, and run through all the arts by eighteen."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
17. "Philippa's letter, from an afflicted conscience, was not very much longer. … if I don't look for him, no one else will. You know I'm sorry. But I couldn't leave that little thing to wither away by itself Don't be sad. We're all going to come back. And you can teach him Two Legs and I Wot a Tree, and save him the top of the milk for his blackberry pie. He'll never know, if we're quick, that nobody wanted him.… Which had, Kate considered as she scrubbed off her tears, a ring of unlikely confidence about it, as well as rather a shaky understanding of the diet of one-year-old babies."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
18. "I never expect anything,' said Marthe. ‘It provides a level, low-pitched existence with no disappointments.' ‘I'm all for a level, low-pitched existence,' said Philippa. ‘And when you see your way back to one, for heaven's sake don't forget to tell me.' At which Marthe, surprisingly, laughed aloud."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
19. "So Philippa got her leave to bring Archie Abernethy with her and sail on the Dauphiné. But they had not seen the woman Marthe before they left Lyons. And permission to sail from Marseilles depended still, Philippa was grimly aware, on whether or not the woman Marthe was found to be eligible. Kiaya Khátún, she imagined, would pass like a shot."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
20. "Only common mortals like the Somervilles have good old rotten hates, dear,' said her mother. ‘Sir Graham manages to love everybody and wouldn't know what you're talking about. Have a bun.' ‘He doesn't love the Turks,' said Philippa. ‘He kills them.' ‘That isn't hate,' said Kate Somerville. ‘That's simply hoeing among one's principles to keep them healthy and neat. I'm sure he would tell you he bears them no personal grudge; and they think they're going to Paradise anyway, so it does everyone good."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
21. "When Philippa had first demanded his help in eluding Kate and travelling to St Mary's, he had indignantly refused. He was there now because he had discovered, to his astonishment, that she was desperate, and perfectly capable of going without him. Why she had got it into her young head she must see this man Crawford, Cheese-wame didn't know. But after pointing out bitterly that (a) he would lose his job; (b) the rogues in the Debatable would kill them, (c) that she would catch her death of cold and (d) that Kate would never speak to either of them again, he went, his belt filled with knives and her belongings as well as his own in the two saddlebags behind his powerful thighs, while Philippa rode sedately beside him on her smaller horse, green with excitement, with her father's pistol tied to her waist like a ship's log and banging against her thin knees."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
22. "For an hour, blended with all she could offer, something noble had been created which had nothing to do with the physical world. And from the turn of his throat, the warmth of his hair, the strong, slender sinews of his hands, something further; which had. Though she combed the earth and searched through the smoke of the galaxies there was no being she wanted but this, who was not and should not be for Philippa Somerville."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
23. "But Philippa was hardly listening. "It's a riddle," she declared finally, pointing to the card in the strange little round window. "I think that if we answer the riddle we can get in. Listen 'The beginning of eternity. The end of time and space. The beginning of every end. And the end pf everyplace." John shrugged. "I don't get it." "No, but I do," Philippa said triumphantly. "The answer is the letter e. E is the beginning of eternity, the end of time and space, the beginning of every end, and the end of everyplace."
Author: P.B. Kerr
24. "Her salary as King's Champion was considerable, and Celaena spentevery last copper of it. Shoes, hats, tunics, dresses, jewelry, weapons,baubles for her hair, and books. Books and books and books. So manybooks that Philippa had to bring up another bookcase for her room."
Author: Sarah J. Maas
25. "In all his life, there had never been anything Cross had wanted to do more than throw this strange woman down on his desk and give her precisely that for which she was asking. Desire was irrelevant. Or perhaps it was the only thing that was relevant. Either way, he could not assist Lady Philippa Marbury. She was the most dangerous female he'd ever met."
Author: Sarah MacLean

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