Top Poet Quotes

Browse top 3000 famous quotes and sayings about Poet by most favorite authors.

Favorite Poet Quotes

1. "I use rock and jazz and blues rhythms because I love that music. I hope my poetry has a relationship with good-time rock'n roll."
Author: Adrian Mitchell
2. "I didn't look to the shore much after this first long and memorable glimpse. I looked up at Heaven and her court of mythical creatures fixed forever in the all powerful and inscrutable stars. Ink black was the night beyond them, and they so like jewels that old poetry came back to me, the sound even of hymns sung only by men."
Author: Anne Rice
3. "Poetry operates by hints and dark suggestions. It is full of secrets and hidden formulae, like a witch's brew."
Author: Anthony Hecht
4. "Making endings sound the same isn't just bad poetry, it also slanders everyone with a superior posterior."
Author: Bauvard
5. "Often people, when they're confronted with a poem, it's like someone who keep saying 'what is the meaning of this? What is the meaning of this?' And that dulls us to the other pleasures poetry offers."
Author: Billy Collins
6. "Here! ‘Not thread nor glue, not nails nor screws, will ever self and shadow wed.' Helpful, those poet-types. Perhaps this one: ‘Seek the grimy queen of dread machines, if you your errant shadow miss.' Now that's quite good! As a Prophetic Utterance, Third Class (Vague Hints and Mysterious Signs), you couldn't ask for better. It's downright plain-spoken!"
Author: Catherynne M. Valente
7. "MotivoEu canto porque o instante existee a minha vida está completa.Não sou alegre nem sou triste:sou poeta.Irmão das coisas fugidias,não sinto gozo nem tormento.Atravesso noites e diasno vento.Se desmorono ou se edifico,se permaneço ou me desfaço,— não sei, não sei. Não sei se ficoou passo.Sei que canto. E a canção é tudo.Tem sangue eterno a asa ritmada.E um dia sei que estarei mudo:— mais nada."— Cecília Meireles"
Author: Cecília Meireles
8. "I will drop into your chest like a vegetal ambrosia. I will be the grain that regenerates the cruelly plowed furrow. Poetry will be born of our intimate union. A god we shall create together, and we shall soar heavenward like sunbeams, perfumes, butterflies, birds, and all winged things."
Author: Charles Baudelaire
9. "I must say a few words about memory. It is full of holes. If you were to lay it out upon a table, it would resemble a scrap of lace. I am a lover of history . . . [but] history has one flaw. It is a subjective art, no less so than poetry or music. . . . The historian writes a truth. The memoirist writes a truth. The novelist writes a truth. And so on. My mother, we both know, wrote a truth in The 19th Wife– a truth that corresponded to her memory and desires. It is not the truth, certainly not. But a truth, yes . . . Her book is a fact. It remains so, even if it is snowflaked with holes."
Author: David Ebershoff
10. "The hillslike poets put onpurple thought againstthemagnificent clamor ofdaytorturedin gold"
Author: E.E. Cummings
11. "Poetry is the deification of reality."
Author: Edith Sitwell
12. "The journey through another world, beyond bad dreamsbeyond the memories of a murdered generation,cartographed in captivity by bare survivorsmakes sacristans of us all.The old ones go our bail, we oblate preachers of our tribes.Be careful, they say, don't hock the beads of kinship agonies; the moire-effect of unfamiliar hymnsupon our own, a change in pitch or shrillness of the voicetransforms the ways of song to words of poetry or proseand makes distinctionsno one recognizes.Surrounded and absorbed, we tread like Etruscanson the edge of useless law; we prayto the giver of prayer, we give the cane whistlein ceremony, we swing the heavy silver chainof incense burners. Migration makes new citizens of Rome."
Author: Elizabeth Cook Lynn
13. "Ma è possibile che ogni volta che parlo di un sogno o di un'ambizione ci deve essere sempre qualcuno che ti guarda e sembra che dica: "diventa grande". E per gli altri diventare grandi vuol dire non credere più di essere una ballerina, un poeta, un musicista, un sognatore, un fiore. Non li sopporto.Una mattina sono uscito di casa, il cielo era azzurro e limpido, ho continuato a guardarlo mentre camminavo, stavo bene, respiravo a pieni polmoni, al terzo passo ho pestato una merda. Cosa devo fare? Rinunciare al cielo per paura delle merde? No, io no Porcaputtana!"
Author: Fabio Volo
14. "Clent, however, suppressed any sense of pity without the slightest difficulty. His brain was busy with the icy clockwork of calculation. If only this young woman's fears were justified! Beamabeth Marlebourne would be unlikely to threaten anybody, locked away inside the Luck's cell for the rest of her life. Such a fate had a tempting poetry to it too, given that she really was the Luck of Toll, and had been all her life."
Author: Frances Hardinge
15. "I haven't been here long, but, nevertheless, all the same, what I've managed to observe and verify here arouses the indignation of my Tartar blood. By God, I don't want such virtues! I managed to make a seven-mile tour here yesterday. Well, it's exactly the same as in those moralizing little German picture books: everywhere here each house has its Vater, terribly virtuous and extraordinarily honest. So honest it's even frightening to go near him. I can't stand honest people whom it's frightening to go near. Each such Vater has a family, and in the evening they all read edifying books aloud. Over their little house, elms and chestnuts rustle. A sunset, a stork on the roof, and all of it extraordinarily poetic and touching…"
Author: Fyodor Dostoyevsky
16. "Em suma, é preciso confessar que existem dois tipos de leitura: a leitura em animus e a leitura em anima. Não sou o mesmo homem quando leio um livro de idéias, em que o animus deve ficar vigilante, pronto para a crítica, pronto para a réplica, ou um livro de poeta, em que as imagens devem ser recebidas numa espécie de acolhimento transcendental dos dons. Ah, para fazer eco a esse dom absoluto que é uma imagem de poeta seria necessário que nossa anima pudesse escrever um hino de agradecimento! O animus lê pouco; a anima, muito.Não é raro o meu animus repreender-me por ler demais.Ler, ler sempre, melíflua paixão da anima. Mas quando, depois de haver lido tudo, entregamo-nos à tarefa, com devaneios, de fazer um livro, o esforço cabe ao animus. E sempre um duro mister, esse de escrever um livro. Somos sempre tentados a limitar-nos a sonhar."
Author: Gaston Bachelard
17. "Poetry is a mere drug, Sir."
Author: George Farquhar
18. "In my opinion, Al Moritz may be the best poet of his generation in Canada."
Author: George Murray
19. "Reading the very best writers—let us say Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, Tolstoy—is not going to make us better citizens. Art is perfectly useless, according to the sublime Oscar Wilde, who was right about everything. He also told us that all bad poetry is sincere. Had I the power to do so, I would command that these words be engraved above every gate at every university, so that each student might ponder the splendor of the insight."
Author: Harold Bloom
20. "Poetry is as necessary to comprehension as science. It is as impossible to live without reverence as it is without joy."
Author: Henry Beston
21. "The creative artist has something in common with the hero. Though functioning on another plane, he too believes that he has solutions to offer. He gives his life to accomplish imaginary triumphs. At the conclusion of every grand experiment, whether by statesman, warrior, poet or philosopher, the problems of life present the same enigmatic complexion. The happiest people, it is said, are those which have no history. Those which have a history, those which have made history, seem only to have emphasized through their accomplishments the eternality of struggle. These disappear too, eventually, just as those who made no effort, who were content merely to live and to enjoy."
Author: Henry Miller
22. "For me concrete poetry was a particular way of using language which came out of a particular feeling, and I don't have control over whether this feeling is in me or not."
Author: Ian Hamilton Finlay
23. "He is power and poetry, grace and perfection, and I feel my body tighten in response to the beauty that is Damien."
Author: J. Kenner
24. "Nothing higher can be accomplished by the epic poet thus interpreting his own time in order to serve the future.(Foreword by Frederick Ungar in Elective Affinities, 1962, Ungar Publishing)"
Author: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
25. "My heart born nakedwas swaddled in lullabies.Later alone it worepoems for clothes.Like a shirtI carried on my backthe poetry I had read.So I lived for half a centuryuntil wordlessly we met.From my shirt on the back of the chairI learn tonighthow many yearsof learning by heartI waited for you."
Author: John Berger
26. "My name was originally John Collins, but I just didn't think it had the flair I needed. I found out the poet laureate of Poland was named Krasinski and so it seemed like a shoe-in for show business."
Author: John Krasinski
27. "Judge: And what is your occupation in general?Brodsky: Poet, poet-translator.Judge: And who recognized you to be a poet? Who put you in the ranks of poet?Brodsky: No one. And who put me in the ranks of humanity?Judge: Did you study it?...How to be a poet? Did you attempt to finish an insitute of higher learning...where they prepare...teachBrodsky: I did not think that it is given to one by education.Judge: By what then?Brodsky: I think that it is from God."
Author: Joseph Brodsky
28. "I think all those ancient prophecies are so full of poetic nonsense that half the time no one understands what they mean." ~ Helen"
Author: Josephine Angelini
29. "Literature is a state of culture, poetry is a state of grace, before and after culture."
Author: Juan Ramon Jimenez
30. "When the last living thingHas died on account of us,How poetical it would beIf Earth could say,In a voice floating upPerhapsFrom the floorOf the Grand Canyon,"It is done."People did not like it here."
Author: Kurt Vonnegut
31. "We are all the spirit sons and daughters of a loving God who is our Father. We are part of His family. He is not a father in some allegorical or poetic sense. He is literally the Father of our spirits. He cares for each one of us. Though this world has a way of diminishing and demeaning men and women, the reality is we are all of royal, divine lineage. In that unprecedented appearance of the Father and the Son in the Sacred Grove, the very first word spoken by the Father of us all was the personal name of Joseph. Such is our Father's personal relationship with each of us. He knows our names and yearns for us to become worthy to return to live with Him."
Author: M. Russell Ballard
32. "Cox shrugged. "if that's what it takes to get laid, then I'm a fuckinin'poet. Other times I'm a fuckin' accountant. Or a plumber. Sometime's a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do."
Author: Madeline Sheehan
33. "You are the know place to which the unknown is always leading me back.""I possess nothing worthy to give you." "There's only me." ~ quotes from poetry that Angelo feels match him and Zach"
Author: Marie Sexton
34. "Poetry?"..."No, just thoughts, glimpses, things running through my head."
Author: Mary E Pearson
35. "I'd spent way more years worrying about how to look like a poet -- buying black clothes, smearing on scarlet lipstick, languidly draping myself over thrift-store furniture -- than I had learning how to assemble words in some discernible order."
Author: Mary Karr
36. "The heaviest of burdens crushes us, we sink beneath it, it pins us to the ground. But in love poetry of every age, the woman longs to be weighed down by the man's body.The heaviest of burdens is therefore simultaneously an image of life's most intense fulfillment. The heavier the burden, the closer our lives come to the earth, the more real and truthful they become. Conversely, the absolute absence of burden causes man to be lighter than air, to soar into heights, take leave of the earth and his earthly being, and become only half real, his movements as free as they are insignificant. What then shall we choose? Weight or lightness?"
Author: Milan Kundera
37. "Is it so wrong, wanting to be at home with your record collection? It's not like collecting records is like collecting stamps, to beermats, to antique thimbles. There's a whole world in here, a nicer, dirtier, more violent, more peaceful, more colorful, sleazier, more dangerous, more loving world than I live in; there is history, and geography, and poetry, and countless other things I should have studied at school, including music."
Author: Nick Hornby
38. "And so in poetry too, the real poetical quality, the joy of poetry, comes never from the subject but from an inventive handling of rhythmical language, from what Keats called the 'sensuous life of verse.' The element of song in the singing accompanied by the profound joy of motion, is so sweet that, while the incomplete lives of ordinary men bring no healing power with them, the thorn-crown of the poet will blossom into roses for our pleasure; for our delight his despair will gild its own thorns, and his pain, like Adonis, be beautiful in its agony; and when the poet's heart breaks it will break in music."
Author: Oscar Wilde
39. "As for the world, all reality has no other excuse for existence except to offer the poet the chance to play a sublime match against it -- a match that is list in advance."
Author: Paul Valéry
40. "It probably started in poetry; almost everything does."
Author: Raymond Chandler
41. "There is an anaesthetic of familiarity, a sedative of ordinariness which dulls the senses and hides the wonder of existence. For those of us not gifted in poetry, it is at least worth while from time to time making an effort to shake off the anaesthetic. What is the best way of countering the sluggish habitutation brought about by our gradual crawl from babyhood? We can't actually fly to another planet. But we can recapture that sense of having just tumbled out to life on a new world by looking at our own world in unfamiliar ways."
Author: Richard Dawkins
42. "… in these new days and in these new pages a philosophical tradition of the spontaneity of speculation kind has been rekindled on the sacred isle of Éire, regardless of its creative custodian never having been taught how to freely speculate, how to profoundly question, and how to playfully define. Spontaneity of speculation being synonymous with the philosophical-poetic, the philosophical-poetic with the rural philosopher-poet, and by roundelay the rural philosopher-poet thee with the spontaneity of speculation be. And by the way of the rural what may we say? A philosopher-poet of illimitable space we say. Iohannes Scottus Ériugena the metaphor of old salutes you; salutes your lyrical ear and your skilful strumming of the rippling harp. (Source: Hearing in the Write, Canto 19, Ivy-muffled)"
Author: Richard McSweeney
43. "It is good sometimes for poetry to disenchant us."
Author: Robert Hass
44. "You make pictures, not take them?Yes. At least that's how I think of it. That's the difference between Sunday snapshooters and someone who does it for a living... I don't just take things as given, I try to make them into something that reflects my personal consciousness, my spirit. I try to find the poetry in the image."
Author: Robert James Waller
45. "Dentro del inmenso océano de la poesía distinguía varias corrientes: maricones, maricas, mariquitas, locas, bujarrones, mariposas, ninfos y filenos. Las dos corrientes mayores, sin embargo, eran la de los maricones y la de los maricas. Walt Whitman, por ejemplo, era un poeta maricón. Pablo Neruda, un poeta marica. William Blake era maricón, sin asomo de duda, y Octavio Paz marica. Borges era fileno, es decir de improviso podía ser maricón y de improviso simplemente asexual. Rubén Darío era una loca, de hecho la reina y el paradigma de las locas. —En nuestra lengua, claro está —aclaró—; en el mundo ancho y ajeno el paradigma sigue siendo Verlaine el Generoso. Una loca, según San Epifanio, estaba más cerca del manicomio florido y de las alucinaciones en carne viva mientras que los maricones y los maricas vagaban sincopadamente de la Ética a la Estética y viceversa."
Author: Roberto Bolaño
46. "Are not couturiers the poets who, from year to year, from strophe to strophe, write the anthem of the feminine body?"
Author: Roland Barthes
47. "Modern poets like Frost still want to make 'deep' statements; but they are also more sceptical of such high-sounding generalities than many of their forebears. So, rather like T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, they gesture enigmatically to such profundities while at the same time being nervous of committing themselves to them."
Author: Terry Eagleton
48. "The people in the world, and the objects in it, and the world as a whole, are not absolute things, but on the contrary, are the phenomena of perception... If we were all alike: if we were millions of people saying do, re, mi, in unison, One poet would be enough... But we are not alone, and everything needs expounding all the time because, as people live and die, each one perceiving life and death for himself, and mostly by and in himself, there develops a curiosity about the perceptions of others. This is what makes it possible to go on saying new things about old things."
Author: Wallace Stevens
49. "Filth and vermin though they shock the over-nice are imperfections of the flesh closely related in the just imagination of the poet to excessive cleanliness."
Author: William Carlos Williams
50. "The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, doth glance from heaven to Earth, from Earth to heaven; and as imagination bodies forth the forms of things unknown, the poet's pen turns them to shape, and gives to airy nothing a local habitation and a name; such tricks hath strong imagination."
Author: William Shakespeare

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His smile was sexy and warned of trouble, but I'd made up my mind that not all trouble was bad."
Author: Becca Fitzpatrick

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