Top Poets Quotes

Browse top 579 famous quotes and sayings about Poets by most favorite authors.

Favorite Poets Quotes

551. "...these poets here, you see, they are not of this world:let them live their strange life; let them be cold and hungry, let them run, love and sing: they are as rich as Jacques Coeur, all these silly children, for they have their souls full of rhymes, rhymes which laugh and cry, which make us laugh or cry: Let them live: God blesses all the merciful: and the world blesses the poets."
Author: Arthur Rimbaud
552. "Periods' are largely an invention of the historians. The poetsthemselves are not conscious of living in any period and refuse to conform to the scheme."
Author: C.S. Lewis
553. "Has not one of the poets said that a noble friend is the best gift and a noble enemy the next best?"
Author: C.S. Lewis
554. "Well, here he was. They could save each other, the way the poets promised lovers should. He was mystery, he was darkness, he was all she had dreamed of. And if she would only free him he would service her - oh yes - until her pleasure reached that threshold that, like all thresholds, was a place where the strong grew stronger, and the weak perished. Pleasure was pain there, and vice versa. And he knew it well enough to call it home."
Author: Clive Barker
555. "I mean this is the kind of love people dream about, poets write sonnets for, and well it's the kind of love that keeps people from losing faith in humanity and encourages people to believe that true love still exists and it's still powerful and still wonderful. (Quote from a reviewer of Loving Lily Lavender)"
Author: DeAnna Kinney
556. "Poets are soldiers that liberate words from the steadfast possession of definition."
Author: Eli Khamarov
557. "And the greatest of the poets, when he defined the poet, did not say that he gave us the universe or the absolute or the infinite; but, in his own larger language, a local habitation and a name."
Author: G.K. Chesterton
558. "Saints and martyrs had never interested Maggie so much as sages and poets."
Author: George Eliot
559. "All men owe honor to the poets - honor and awe; for they are dearest to the Muse who puts upon their lips the ways of life."
Author: Homer
560. "They're not. That's partly what's so awful. I mean they're not real poets. They're just people that write poems that get published and anthologized all over the place but they're not poets."
Author: J.D. Salinger
561. "...after I published a paper showing that suicidal poets used pronouns differently from non-suicidal poets, a slightly inebriated poet threatened me with a butter knife at a party in my own home."
Author: James W. Pennebaker
562. "Poets are never unemployed, just unpaid."
Author: Kathy Skaggs
563. "The world calls them its singers and poets and artists and story-tellers; but they are just people who have never forgotten the way to fairyland."~Lucy Maud Montgomery (Anne of Green Gables)"
Author: L.M. Montgomery
564. "Odurna je životinjska priroda zvjeri u covjeku, ali kad je ona u cistom obliku, onda je ti s visine svog duševnog života vidiš i prezireš, pa ili pao, ili se održao - ti ostaješ ono što si bio; ali kad se ta ista životinja krije pod tobože estetskim, poetskim ovojem i iziskuje da joj se pokloniš, onda sam nestaješ u njoj i, obožavajuci životinju, ne razlikuješ više dobro od zla. Onda je to užasno."
Author: Leo Tolstoy
565. "Poets create gods, philosophers destroy them."
Author: Marty Rubin
566. "Good artists exist simply in what they make, and consequently are perfectly uninteresting in what they are. A great poet, a really great poet, is the most unpoetical of all creatures. But inferior poets are absolutely fascinating."
Author: Oscar Wilde
567. "Poets, as a class, are business men. Shakespeare describes the poet's eye as rolling in a fine frenzy from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven, and giving to airy nothing a local habitation and a name, but in practice you will find that one corner of that eye is generally glued on the royalty returns."
Author: P.G. Wodehouse
568. "Frost is the most sophisticated of poets."
Author: Peter Davison
569. "And the true realism, always and everywhere, is that of the poets: to find out where joy resides, and give it a voice far beyond singing. For to miss the joy is to miss all."
Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
570. "She knew that what she was going through was nothing special, just garden-variety heartbreak, the sort of thing that poets and novelists had been writing about for hundreds of years, but she also knew, from those same books, that there were people who never recover form it, ones who go on through life beset by a dim and painful longing."
Author: Sarah Dunn
571. "As I was a stranger in Olondria, I knew nothing of the splendour of its coasts, nor of Bain, the Harbour City, whose lights and colours spill into the ocean like a cataract of roses. I did not know the vastness of the spice markets of Bain, where the merchants are delirious with scents, I had never seen the morning mists adrift above the surface of the green Illoun, of which the poets sing; I had never seen a woman with gems in her hair, nor observed the copper glinting of the domes, nor stood upon the melancholy beaches of the south while the wind brought in the sadness from the sea. Deep within the Fayaleith, the Country of the Wines, the clarity of light can stop the heart: it is the light the local people call 'the breath of angels'..."
Author: Sofia Samatar
572. "Each of us is aware he's a material being, subject to the laws of physiology and physics, and that the strength of all our emotions combined cannot counteract those laws. It can only hate them. The eternal belief of lovers and poets in the power of love which is more enduring that death, the finis vitae sed non amoris that has pursued us through the centuries is a lie. But this lie is not ridiculous, it's simply futile. To be a clock on the other hand, measuring the passage of time, one that is smashed and rebuilt over and again, one in whose mechanism despair and love are set in motion by the watchmaker along with the first movements of the cogs. To know one is a repeater of suffering felt ever more deeply as it becomes increasingly comical through a multiple repetitions. To replay human existence - fine. But to replay it in the way a drunk replays a corny tune pushing coins over and over into the jukebox?"
Author: Stanisław Lem
573. "But the worst of it was, all the third-rate poets emerged unscathed; being third-rate, they didn't know good poetry from bad and consequently had no inkling of their crushing defeat."
Author: Stanisław Lem
574. "Scientists have power by virtue of the respect commanded by the discipline... We live with poets and politicians, preachers and philosophers. All have their ways of knowing, and all are valid in their proper domain. The world is too complex and interesting for one way to hold all the answers."
Author: Stephen Jay Gould
575. "I wonder about all the roads not taken and am moved to quote Frost...but won't. It is sad to be able only to mouth other poets. I want someone to mouth me."
Author: Sylvia Plath
576. "Modern poets like Frost still want to make 'deep' statements; but they are also more sceptical of such high-sounding generalities than many of their forebears. So, rather like T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, they gesture enigmatically to such profundities while at the same time being nervous of committing themselves to them."
Author: Terry Eagleton
577. "Poets write beautiful words to describe savagery-wrapped civilization nowadays."
Author: Toba Beta
578. "HIS chosen comrades thought at schoolHe must grow a famous man;He thought the same and lived by rule,All his twenties crammed with toil;'What then?' sang Plato's ghost. 'What then?'Everything he wrote was read,After certain years he wonSufficient money for his need,Friends that have been friends indeed;'What then?' sang Plato's ghost. ' What then?'All his happier dreams came true --A small old house, wife, daughter, son,Grounds where plum and cabbage grew,poets and Wits about him drew;'What then.?' sang Plato's ghost. 'What then?'The work is done,' grown old he thought,'According to my boyish plan;Let the fools rage, I swerved in naught,Something to perfection brought';But louder sang that ghost, 'What then?"
Author: W.B. Yeats
579. "To have great poets, there must be great audiences."
Author: Walt Whitman

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And people get all fouled up because they want the world to have meaning as if it were words... As if you had a meaning, as if you were a mere word, as if you were something that could be looked up in a dictionary. You are meaning."
Author: Alan Wilson Watts

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