Top Poets Quotes

Browse top 579 famous quotes and sayings about Poets by most favorite authors.

Favorite Poets Quotes

201. "Poets, in their way, are practical men; they are interested in results."
Author: Allen Tate
202. "Ah, sweetie. If the poets couldn't unriddle them, then you certainly can't. Be kind, and keep your ears on offer if she wants to talk. But you can't draw out the strangeness, Edgar. It's not a poison."
Author: Allyse Near
203. "The poets, when they speak of war, talk of the shield wall, they talk of the spears and arrows flying, of the blade beating on the shield, of the heroes who fall and the spoils of the victors, but I was to discover that war was really about food. About feeding men and horses. About finding food. The army that eats wins."
Author: Bernard Cornwell
204. "People have many cruel expectations from writers. People expect novelists to live on a hill with three kids and a spouse, people expect children's story writers to never have sex, and people expect all great poets to be dead. And these are all very difficult expectations to fulfill, I think."
Author: C. JoyBell C.
205. "I reject at once an idea which lingers in the mind of some modern people that cultural activities are in their own right spiritual and meritorious--as though scholars and poets were intrinsically more pleasing to God than scavengers and bootblacks."
Author: C.S. Lewis
206. "It was likely, then that this—-this stumbling walk on a wet night across a ploughed field-—meant death. Death—-the thing one had always heard of (like love), the thing the poets had written about. So this was how it was going to be. But that was not the main point."
Author: C.S. Lewis
207. "But as God said, crossing his legs, I see where I have made plenty of poets but not so very much poetry."
Author: Charles Bukowski
208. "I must have wanton Poets, pleasant wits,Musitians, that with touching of a stringMay draw the pliant king which way I please:Musicke and poetrie is his delight,Therefore ile have Italian maskes by night,Sweete speeches, comedies, and pleasing showes,And in the day when he shall walke abroad,Like Sylvian Nimphes my pages shall be clad,My men like Satyres grazing on the lawnes,Shall with their Goate feete daunce an antick hay.Sometime a lovelie boye in Dians shape,With haire that gilds the water as it glides,Crownets of pearle about his naked armes,And in his sportfull hands an Olive tree,To hide those parts which men delight to see,Shall bathe him in a spring, and there hard by,One like Actaeon peeping through the grove,Shall by the angrie goddesse be transformde,And running in the likenes of an Hart,By yelping hounds puld downe, and seeme to die.Such things as these best please his majestie,My lord."
Author: Christopher Marlowe
209. "I do not think men have more talent. There are a great many women in the arts; novelists, painters, sculptors, poets-but the proportion is far lower in the field of song writing."
Author: Dorothy Fields
210. "Poets and intellectuals...are the ones the tyrants go after first."
Author: Frederick Smock
211. "We talk so abstractly about poetry because all of us are usually bad poets."
Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
212. "I dare to think that it is this outsized reality, and not just its literary expression, that has deserved the attention of the Swedish Academy of Letters. A reality not of paper, but one that lives within us and determines each instant of our countless daily deaths, and that nourishes a source of insatiable creativity, full of sorrow and beauty, of which this roving and nostalgic Colombian is but one cipher more, singled out by fortune. Poets and beggars, musicians and prophets, warriors and scoundrels, all creatures of that unbridled reality, we have had to ask but little of imagination, for our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable. This, my friends, is the crux of our solitude."
Author: Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
213. "The reader reads aloud, with a sing-song up … then down … then down again cadence. My mood shifts from merely reluctant to derisive. It's a tired reading style. I'm sick of it. It attaches more importance to the words than the words themselves—as they've been arranged—could possibly sustain, and it gives poets and poetry a bad name."
Author: Gabrielle Hamilton
214. "That's a poet.''I thought you said it was a bo-at.''Stupid pet! Don't you know what a poet it?''Why, a thing to sail on the water in.''Well, perhaps you're not so far wrong. Some poets do carry people over the sea....'...'A poet is a man who is glad of something, and tries to make other people glad of it too."
Author: George MacDonald
215. "Yes, it is wonderful to be alive! Indeed, the Bottle inwardly sang of all this, as do young poets, who frequently also know nothing about the things of which they sing." From The Bottle Neck"
Author: Hans Christian Andersen
216. "Sure there are poets which did never dreamUpon Parnassus, nor did taste the stream Of Helicon; we therefore may suppose Those made not poets, but the poets those."
Author: Henry David Thoreau
217. "They have the guns, we have the poets. Therefore, we will win."
Author: Howard Zinn
218. "Maybe I just didn't want it to be Benny because he really loves her, and if I was wrong about that, it'd be depressing. Who wants to be depressed?""Poets," Eve decided. "You have to think they must.""Okay, other than poets."
Author: J.D. Robb
219. "Poets are always taking the weather so personally."
Author: J.D. Salinger
220. "Therefore, poets do not 'fit' into society, not because a place is denied them but because they do not take their 'places' seriously. They openly see its roles as theatrical, its styles as poses, its clothing costumes, its rules conventional, its crises arranged, its conflicts performed and its metaphysics ideological."
Author: James P. Carse
221. "Poets and novelists and playwrights make themselves, against terrible resistances, give over what the rest of us keep safely locked within our hearts."
Author: Janet Malcolm
222. "You know, poets and songwriters have long known that people like repetition. You know, poets and songwriters have long known that people like repetition. I guess when I say people, I mean everyone but my Grandfather. He hated anything that was so monotonous as repetition. That's why he loathed walking so much. Left foot, right foot, left foot, right foot, and on and on."
Author: Jarod Kintz
223. "Night winds in Georgia are vagrant poets, whispering."
Author: Jean Toomer
224. "There are horrible events going on all over the world. Human beings are really fucking up. Poets, we can't just write poems. We have to put poems into action."
Author: Jeremiah Walton
225. "A lot of poets too live on the margins of social acceptance, they certainly aren't in it for the money. William Blake - only his first book was legitimately published."
Author: Jim Jarmusch
226. "Listen, for poets are feigned to lie, and I For you a liar am a thousand times . . . ."
Author: John Berryman
227. "In England, coffeehouses were dubbed penny-universities, because for the admission price of one cent, a person could sit and be edified all day long by scholars, merchants, travelers, community leaders, gossips, and poets."
Author: Leah Hager Cohen
228. "My sisters were going out with artists and poets, and eventually it was the creative world which attracted me."
Author: Luc Ferrari
229. "Hence one meets in polite society few novelists, or poets, few of all those sublime creatures who speak of the things that are not to be mentioned."
Author: Marcel Proust
230. "Once in a while, though, he went on binges. He would sneak into bookstores or libraries, lurk around the racks where the little magazines were kept; sometimes he'd buy one. Dead poets were his business, living ones his vice. Much of the stuff he read was crap and he knew it; still, it gave him an odd lift. Then there would be the occasional real poem, and he would catch his breath. Nothing else could drop him through space like that, then catch him; nothing else could peel him open."
Author: Margaret Atwood
231. "The easier a thing is to write then the more the writer gets paid for writing it. (And vice versa: ask the poets at the bus stop.)"
Author: Martin Amis
232. "Of poets I put Virgil first - he was greatest."
Author: Mary MacLane
233. "Nations are born in the hearts of poets, they prosper and die in the hands of politicians."
Author: Muhammad Iqbal
234. "Ireland is a land of poets and legends, of dreamers and rebels. All of these have music woven through and around them. Tunes for dancing or for weeping, for battle or for love."
Author: Nora Roberts
235. "Poets talk about "spots of time," but it is really fishermen who experience eternity compressed into a moment. No one can tell what a spot of time is until suddenly the whole world is a fish and the fish is gone."
Author: Norman Maclean
236. "My memory often seems like a city of exiled poets afire with the astonishment of language, each believing in the integrity of his own witness, each with a separate version of culture and history, and the divine essential fire that is poetry itself."
Author: Pat Conroy
237. "There were no rules when it came to writing, he said. Take a close look at the lives of poets and novelists, and what you wound up with was unalloyed chaos, an infinite jumble of exceptions. That was because writing was a disease, Tom continued, what you might call an infection or influenza of the spirit, and therefore it could strike anyone at any time. The young and the old, the strong and the weak, the drunk and the sober, the sane and the insane. Scan the roster of the giants and semi-giants, and you would discover writers who embraced every sexual proclivity, every political bent, and every human attribute — from the loftiest idealism to the most insidious corruption. They were criminals and lawyers, spies and doctors, soldiers and spinsters, travelers and shut-ins."
Author: Paul Auster
238. "But there is some way in which poets believe that and this is dangerous, too believe that their calling gives them a certain freedom. A certain freedom to live in a free way."
Author: Peter Davison
239. "We are going to die, and that makes us the lucky ones. Most people are never going to die because they are never going to be born. The potential people who could have been here in my place but who will in fact never see the light of day outnumber the sand grains of Arabia. Certainly those unborn ghosts include greater poets than Keats, scientists greater than Newton. We know this because the set of possible people allowed by our DNA so massively exceeds the set of actual people. In the teeth of these stupefying odds it is you and I, in our ordinariness, that are here.We privileged few, who won the lottery of birth against all odds, how dare we whine at our inevitable return to that prior state from which the vast majority have never stirred?"
Author: Richard Dawkins
240. "I'm not, by nature, a collaborator. My biggest influences were people like painters and poets. These are solitary workers."
Author: Robert Wyatt
241. "The gift that isn't big enough to make a mark, but is too big to leave the possessor in peace. And so they can't be content to be Sunday painters, or poets who write for a few friends, or composers whose handful of delicate little settings of Emily Dickinson can't find a singer. It's a special sort of hell."
Author: Robertson Davies
242. "Distant singing is heard. Ghostly voices become audible: fragments of lectures remembered, the finely distilled wisdom and passion of seers and poets with which the modern young mind is tempered for the world that blows it to pieces."
Author: Tennessee Williams
243. "Emily: Do any human beings ever realise life while they live it?--every, every minute?Stage Manager: No. The saints and poets, maybe--they do some."
Author: Thornton Wilder
244. "It is as if the soul of the continent is weeping. Why does it weep? It weeps for the bones of the buffalo. It weeps for magic that has been forgotten. It weeps for the decline of poets.It weepsfor the black people who think like white people.It weepsfor the Indians who think like settlers.It weepsfor the children who think like adults.It weepsfor the free who think like prisoners.Most of all, it weepsfor the cowgirls who think like cowboys."
Author: Tom Robbins
245. "Robert Frost didn't like to explain his poems—and for good reason: to explain a poem is to suck the air from its lungs. This does not mean, however, that poets shouldn't talk about their poetry, or that one shouldn't ask questions about it. Rather, it suggests that any discussion of poetry should celebrate its ultimate ineffability and in so doing lead one to further inquiry. I think of that wonderful scene from Elie Wiesel's memoir, Night, where Mosche the Beadle of the local synagogue, in dialogue with the young, precocious author, explains: "Every question possesses a power that does not lie in the answer."
Author: Tony Leuzzi
246. "Well," he said slowly, "sometimes there's a passion that comes in its springtime to ill fate or death. And because it ends in its beauty, it's what the harpers sing of and the poets make stories of: the love that escapes the years...."All or nothing, the true lover says, and that's the truth of it. My love will never die, he says. He claims eternity. And rightly. How can it die when it's life itself? What do we know of eternity but the glimpse we get of it when we enter in that bond?"
Author: Ursula K. Le Guin
247. "Love is fragile at best and often a burden or something that blinds us. It's fodder for poets and song writers and they build it into something beyond human capacity. Falling in love means enrolling yourself in the school of disappointment. Being human means failing each other often, and no two people fail each other more than two people who pledge to do things for each other that they'll never do because they are just incapable of it...That's why art is enduring. The look of love or hope, or the look of compassion, bravery, whatever, is captured forever. We spend our lives trying to get someone to be as enduring as a painting or a sculpture and we can't because feelings crumble as quickly as the flesh."
Author: V.C. Andrews
248. "Of those few fools, who with ill stars are curst,Sure scribbling fools, called poets, fare the worst:For they're a sort of fools which fortune makes,And, after she has made them fools, forsakes.With Nature's oafs 'tis quite a different case,For Fortune favours all her idiot race.In her own nest the cuckoo eggs we find,Over which she broods to hatch the changeling kind:No portion for her own she has to spare,So much she dotes on her adopted care.Poets are bubbles, by the town drawn in,Suffered at first some trifling stakes to win:But what unequal hazards do they run!Each time they write they venture all they've won:The Squire that's buttered still, is sure to be undone.This author, heretofore, has found your favour,But pleads no merit from his past behaviour.To build on that might prove a vain presumption,Should grant to poets made admit resumption,And in Parnassus he must lose his seat,If that be found a forfeited estate."
Author: William Congreve
249. "Happy the bard, (if that fair name belongTo him that blends no fable with his song)Whose lines uniting, by an honest art,The faithful monitors and poets part,Seek to delight, that they may mend mankind,And while they captivate, inform the mind.Still happier, if he till a thankful soil,And fruit reward his honorable toil:But happier far who comfort those that waitTo hear plain truth at Judah's hallow'd gate"
Author: William Cowper
250. "Some of us – poets are not exactly poets. We live sometimes – beyond the word."
Author: Wole Soyinka

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I love costumes. I love getting dressed up because it really helps my imagination make the leap to believe that I am who I say I am."
Author: Alessandro Nivola

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