Top Probable Quotes

Browse top 296 famous quotes and sayings about Probable by most favorite authors.

Favorite Probable Quotes

251. "We are a people of improbable hope."
Author: Barack Obama
252. "If I discover within myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world."
Author: C.S. Lewis
253. "The following proposition seems to me in a high degree probable—namely, that any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social instincts, the parental and filial affections being here included, would inevitably acquire a moral sense or conscience, as soon as its intellectual powers had become as well, or nearly as well developed, as in man. For, firstly, the social instincts lead an animal to take pleasure in the society of its fellows, to feel a certain amount of sympathy with them, and to perform various services for them."
Author: Charles Darwin
254. "She gave him a wan smile. "And then you came, Eragon. You and Saphira. After hope had deserted me and I was about to be taken to Galbatorix in Uru'baen, a Rider appeared to rescue me. A rider and a dragon!""And Morzan's son," he said. "Both of Morzan's sons.""Describe it how you will, it was such an improbable rescue, I occasionally think that I did go mad and that I've imagined everything since."
Author: Christopher Paolini
255. "Wherever I'm going, I'll be there to apply the formula. I'll keep the secret intact.It's simple arithmetic.It's a story problem.If a new car built by my company leaves Chicago traveling west at 60 miles per hour, and the rear differential locks up, and the car crashes and burns with everyone trapped inside, does my company initiate a recall?You take the population of vehicles in the field (A) and multiple it by the probable rate of failure (B), then multiply the result by the average cost of an out-of-court settlement (C).A times B times C equals X. This is what it will cost if we don't initiate a recall.If X is greater than the cost of a recall, we recall the cars and no one gets hurt.If X is less than the cost of a recall, then we don't recall."
Author: Chuck Palahniuk
256. "With a tension in his stomach, such as one suffers when watching an acrobat leaving the virtuosity of his safety in a mad unraveling whirl into probable death, Felix watched the hand descend, take up the note, and disappear into the limbo of the doctor's pocket. He knew that he would continue to like the doctor, though he was aware that it would be in spite of a long series of convulsions of the spirit, analogous to the displacement in the fluids of the oyster, that must cover its itch with a peal: so he would have to cover the doctor. He knew at the same time that this stricture of acceptance (by which what we must love is made into what we can love) would eventually be a part of himself, though originally brought on by no will of his own."
Author: Djuna Barnes
257. "The impossible often has a kind of integrity to it which the merely improbable lacks."
Author: Douglas Adams
258. "You are tired,(I think)Of the always puzzle of living and doing;And so am I.Come with me, then,And we'll leave it far and far away—(Only you and I, understand!)You have played,(I think)And broke the toys you were fondest of,And are a little tired now;Tired of things that break, and—Just tired.So am I.But I come with a dream in my eyes tonight,And knock with a rose at the hopeless gate of your heart—Open to me!For I will show you the places Nobody knows,And, if you like,The perfect places of Sleep.Ah, come with me!I'll blow you that wonderful bubble, the moon,That floats forever and a day;I'll sing you the jacinth songOf the probable stars;I will attempt the unstartled steppes of dream,Until I find the Only Flower,Which shall keep (I think) your little heartWhile the moon comes out of the sea."
Author: E.E. Cummings
259. "Something he knew he had missed: the flower of life. But he thought of it now as a thing so unattainable and improbable that to have repined would have been like despairing because one had not drawn the first prize in a lottery."
Author: Edith Wharton
260. "Je pense pour ma part que les livres sont comme les être humains. Parfois, nous les aimons pour des raisons cohérentes, raisonnées et intelligibles. Ils sont bien écrits, riches et attrayants comme des éphèbes bien nés. Mais de temps à autre, notre inclinaison vers tel ou tel ouvrage relève plus du pulsionnel, de la passion et de l'irrationnel. Exactement de la même façon dont on s'éprend d'une personne improbable qui ne correspond en rien à nos attentes."
Author: Eli Esseriam
261. "I consider Anarchism the most beautiful and practical philosophy that has yet been thought of in its application to individual expression and the relation it establishes between the individual and society. Moreover, I am certain that Anarchism is too vital and too close to human nature ever to die. It is my conviction that dictatorship, whether to the right or to the left, can never work--that it never has worked, and that time will prove this again, as it has been proved before. When the failure of modern dictatorship and authoritarian philosophies becomes more apparent and the realization of failure more general, Anarchism will be vindicated. Considered from this point, a recrudescence of Anarchist ideas in the near future is very probable. When this occurs and takes effect, I believe that humanity will at last leave the maze in which it is now lost and will start on the path to sane living and regeneration through freedom."
Author: Emma Goldman
262. "Before I go on with this short history, let me make a general observation– the test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless and yet be determined to make them otherwise. This philosophy fitted on to my early adult life, when I saw the improbable, the implausible, often the "impossible," come true."
Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald
263. "The problem is compounded by the fact that the connection between cause and effect seems so improbable. By turning on the lights, filling the kettle, taking the children to school, driving to the shops, we are condemning other people to death. We never chose to do this. We do not see ourselves as killers. We perform these acts without passion or intent."
Author: George Monbiot
264. "Farce treats the improbable as probable, the impossible as possible."
Author: George Pierce Baker
265. "To live only to suffer—only to feel the injury of life repeated and enlarged—it seemed to her she was too valuable, too capable, for that. Then she wondered if it were vain and stupid to think so well of herself. When had it even been a guarantee to be valuable? Wasn't all history full of the destruction of precious things? Wasn't it much more probable that if one were fine one would suffer?"
Author: Henry James
266. "It had been devilish awkward, as the young men say, to be found by Juliana in the dead of night examining the attachment of her bureau; and it had not been less so to have to believe for a good many hours after that it was highly probable I had killed her."
Author: Henry James
267. "Bueno. Muéstrame a una persona que cree que sabe lo que es "bueno" y probablemente seré capaz de mostrarte a una persona horrorosa. Muéstrame a una persona que realmente sabe lo que es "bueno" y te mostraré que casi nunca usa la palabra."
Author: Idries Shah
268. "No tiene ningún sentido hacerse ahora esas preguntas, lo sé. Pero las preguntas no lo saben. Ellas llegan sin avisar, sin informarse antes de si lo hacen en el momento adecuado. Quieren que uno se ocupe de ellas, sea cual sea el momento en que se presentan. Yo ya me he acostumbrado a tratarlas bien. Les contesto que no sé. A veces les digo también que creo que no, que no habría cambiado nada. Tal vez lo hubiera hecho otro, y a lo mejor –o incluso probablemente –habría salido todo pero si yo hubiera salido corriendo. Eso siempre las tranquiliza un poco."
Author: Isabel Abedi
269. "-¡Llamaré a tu padre! -Y él probablemente me golpeará en el hombro y me dirá que ya era hora!"
Author: Jamie McGuire
270. "If gratitude and esteem are good foundations of affection, Elizabeth's change of sentiment will be neither improbable nor faulty. But if otherwise--if regard springing from such sources is unreasonable or unnatural, in comparison of what is so often described as arising on a first interview with its object, and even before two words have been exchanged, nothing can be said in her defence, except that she had given somewhat of a trial to the latter method in her partiality for Wickham, and that its ill success might, perhaps, authorise her to seek the other less interesting mode of attachment."
Author: Jane Austen
271. "His emotion on entering the room, in seeing her altered looks, and in receiving the pale hand which she immediately held out to him, was such as, in Elinor's conjecture, must arise from something more than his affection for Marianne, or the consciousness of its being known to others; and she soon discovered, in his melancholy eye and varying complexion as he looked at her sister, the probable recurrence of many past scenes of misery to his mind, brought back by that resemblance between Marianne and Eliza already acknowledged, and now strengthened by the hollow eye, the sickly skin, the posture of reclining weakness; and the warm acknowledgment of peculiar obligation."
Author: Jane Austen
272. "That's what got her, of course. That everyone thought it so unbelievable that she could possibly attract a man like him. It shouldn't upset her because it was true. She couldn't. Not in this world, in this lifetime. Yet she didn't appreciated everyone else acting as if they were the most improbable twosome since Quasimodo hit on Esmeralda."
Author: Jo Leigh
273. "Reading is the way mankind delays the inevitable. Reading is the way we shake our fist at the sky. As long as we have these epic, improbable reading projects arrayed before us, we cannot breathe our last: Tell the Angel of Death to come back later; I haven't quite finished Villette."
Author: Joe Queenan
274. "On the proper role of coincidence in fiction—more exactly in storymaking, ... Aristotle declares in effect that since real life now and then includes unlikely coincidences both idle and consequential ... a storymaker may legitimately deploy such a possible-though-improbable happenstance to begin the tale or to give its plot-screws an early turn. Thereafter, however, the Plausible (even when strictly impossible) is ever to be preferred to the Possible-but-Unlikely; and in the resolution of a plot, most particularly, coincidence ought to be eschewed. Fate in fiction, decrees the great A, ought to flow from character and situation, not from chance; let no god on wires drop down at climax-time to rescue the storymaker from whatever dramaturgical corner his want of experience, talent, or judgment has painted him into."
Author: John Barth
275. "...a veces nos preguntamos por qué la felicidad tarda tanto en llegar, por qué no vino antes, pero si nos aparece de repente, como en este caso, cuando ya no la esperábamos, entonces lo más probable es que no sepamos qué hacer con ella, y la cuestión no es tanto elegir entre reír o llorar, es la secreta angustia de pensar que tal vez no consigamos estar a su altura"
Author: José Saramago
276. "Probablemente de todos nuestros sentimientos el único que no es verdaderamente nuestro es la esperanza. La esperanza le pertenece a la vida, es la vida misma defendiéndose."
Author: Julio Cortázar
277. "I want to do mysterious and improbable things alongside a fierce and beautiful girl who looks like a doll brought to life by a sorcerer."
Author: Laini Taylor
278. "I should add, however, that, particularly on the occasion of Samhain, bonfires were lit with the express intention of scaring away the demonic forces of winter, and we know that, at Bealltainn in Scotland, offerings of baked custard were made within the last hundred and seventy years to the eponymous spirits of wild animals which were particularly prone to prey upon the flocks - the eagle, the crow, and the fox, among others. Indeed, at these seasons all supernatural beings were held in peculiar dread. It seems by no means improbable that these circumstances reveal conditions arising out of a later solar pagan worship in respect of which the cult of fairy was relatively greatly more ancient, and perhaps held to be somewhat inimical."
Author: Lewis Spence
279. "This brings me to the question of the antiquity of the belief in fairies and to the associated problem of the existence of strata or stages in fairy belief. The antiquity of the belief is revealed by the wide distribution of tales concerning fairies, while it is also indicated by the antipathy of the elves to iron and salt - ancient taboos both. Not only so, but many traits respecting fairies, especially shape-shifting and the belief in their semi-corporeal state, are eloquent of primitive notions. That the process of the fairy belief witnessed more than one stage of development in the course of successive ages appears more than probable. 'The fairies of one race,' remarks Wentz, 'are the people of the preceding race.' If this statement lacks a certain precision, one realizes the implication; that is, that the ghosts or gods of a preceding race may come to be regarded by their successors as fairies."
Author: Lewis Spence
280. "For me to want to be an actor was an improbable idea. I wasn't beautiful or pretty in any conventional way. I wasn't an ingenue at 22. But I was always certain of it and certain of its power. I felt the power when I went to the theater at 9, 10, 12 and 14."
Author: Linda Hunt
281. "We thought of [New York] as a free city, like one of those storied prewar tropical nests of intrigue and licentiousness where exiles and lamsters and refugees found shelter in a tangle of improbable juxtapositions."
Author: Luc Sante
282. "What use were his talons and fangs to the dying tiger? In the clutches, say, to make matters worse, of a boa-constrictor? But apparently this improbable tiger had no intention of dying just yet. On the contrary, he intended taking a little walk, taking the boa-constrictor with him, even to pretend, for a while, it wasn't there."
Author: Malcolm Lowry
283. "Quien no haya pasado tardes enteras delante de un libro, con las orejas ardiéndole y el pelo caído por la cara, leyendo y leyendo, olvidado del mundo y sin darse cuenta de que tenía hambre o se estaba quedando helado... Quien nunca haya leído en secreto a la luz de una linterna, bajo la manta, porque Papá o Mamá o alguna otra persona solícita le ha apagado la luz con el argumento bien intencionado de que tiene que dormir, porque mañana hay que levantarse tempranito...Quien nunca haya llorado abierta o disimuladamente lágrimas amargas, porque una historia maravillosa acaba y había que decir adiós a personajes con los que había corrido tantas aventuras, a los que quería y admiraba, por los que había temido y rezado, y sin cuya compañía la vida le parecería vacía y sin sentido…Quien no conozca todo esto por propia experiencia no podrá comprender probablemente lo que Bastián hizo entoces."
Author: Michael Ende
284. "Any of the components of an organism-say, a haemoglobin molecule-can be given an arbitrarily complete and precise description in the language of atomic physics or chemistry, and yet this description will miss something that is nevertheless materially relevant to its structure and its very existence. Specifically, it will provide no hint of why this highly improbable molecular configuration is so prevalent, as compared with the astronomical number of molecular forms that are not present. Haemoglobin,"
Author: Paul Davies
285. "But I never did escape from this plot-driven world into a more congenial, subtly probable, innerly propelled narrative of my own devising--didn't make it to the airport,...--and that was because in the taxi I remembered a political cartoon I'd seen in the British papers when I was living in London during the Lebanon war, a detestable cartoon of a big-nosed Jew, his hands meekly opened out in front of him and his shoulders raised in a shrug as though to disavow responsibility, standing atop a pyramid of dead Arab bodies. Purportedly a caricature of Menachem Begin, then prime minister of Israel, the drawing was, in fact, a perfectly realistic, unequivocal depiction of a kike as classically represented in the Nazi press. The cartoon was what turned me around. Barely ten minutes out of Jerusalem, I told the driver to take me back to the King David Hotel."
Author: Philip Roth
286. "And Agathon said, It is probable, Socrates, that I knew nothing of what I had said.And yet spoke you beautifully, Agathon, he said."
Author: Plato
287. "A person's mere propinquity to others independently suspected of criminal activity does not give rise to probable cause to search that person."
Author: Potter Stewart
288. "I cannot know for certain but I think God is very improbable, and I live my life on the assumption that he is not there."
Author: Richard Dawkins
289. "Lo más probable es que tuviera una hemorragia interna y una conmoción cerebral, eso sin duda, pero nunca llegamos a averiguarlo. No te preocupas por esas menudencias cuando tu mejor amiga es una maldita curandera."
Author: Richelle Mead
290. "The campus, an academy of trees,under which some hand, the wind's I guess,had scattered the pale lightof thousands of spring beauties,petals stained with pink veins;secret, blooming for themselves.We sat among them.Your long fingers, thin body,and long bones of improbable genius;some scattered gene as Kafka must have had.Your deep voice, this passing dust of miracles.That simple that was myself, half conscious,as though each moment was a pagewhere words appeared; the bent hammer of the typestruck against the moving ribbon.The light air, the restless leaves;the ripple of time warped by our longing.There, as if we were paintedby some unknown impressionist."
Author: Ruth Stone
291. "There are responses which originate from joy. Intuition can also mean an instant recognition of a truth, sensing that you are doing the right thing in making a choice or decision even if it is not the immediately obvious option, or an experience of knowing the probable outcome just as it is beginning to unfold. The dictionary defines it as immediate unreasoned perception."
Author: Sylvia Clare
292. "Once you've ruled out the impossible then whatever is left, however improbable, must be the truth. The problem lay in working out what was impossible, of course. That was the trick, all right. There was also the curious incident of the orangutan in the night-time."
Author: Terry Pratchett
293. "When mankind first saw the necessity of government, it is probable that many had conceived the desire of ruling."
Author: Thomas Clarkson
294. "Ever since his first ecstasy or vision of Christminster and its possibilities, Jude had meditated much and curiously on the probable sort of process that was involved in turning the expressions of one language into those of another. He concluded that a grammar of the required tongue would contain, primarily, a rule, prescription, or clue of the nature of a secret cipher, which, once known, would enable him, by merely applying it, to change at will all words of his own speech into those of the foreign one. His childish idea was, in fact, a pushing to the extremity of mathematical precision what is everywhere known as Grimm's Law—an aggrandizement of rough rules to ideal completeness. Thus he assumed that the words of the required language were always to be found somewhere latent in the words of the given language by those who had the art to uncover them, such art being furnished by the books aforesaid."
Author: Thomas Hardy
295. "That this complex universe should appear by accident out of nothing from a "big bang" is as probable as the works of Shakespeare resulting from an explosion in a printing plant."
Author: Warren W. Wiersbe
296. "I don't think it is enough appreciated how much an outdoor book the Bible is. It is a "hypaethral book," such as Thoreau talked about - a book open to the sky. It is best read and understood outdoors, and the farther outdoors the better. Or that has been my experience of it. Passages that within walls seem improbable or incredible, outdoors seem merely natural. This is because outdoors we are confronted everywhere with wonders; we see that the miraculous is not extraordinary but the common mode of existence. It is our daily bread."
Author: Wendell Berry

Probable Quotes Pictures

Quotes About Probable
Quotes About Probable
Quotes About Probable

Today's Quote

In my case I don't mind playing a character that irritates people or makes people question my sanity."
Author: Billy Corgan

Famous Authors

Popular Topics