Top Sand And Ocean Quotes

Browse top 25 famous quotes and sayings about Sand And Ocean by most favorite authors.

Favorite Sand And Ocean Quotes

1. "As long as it's a regular day, not too rough to begin with, the ocean is pretty smooth once you make it out past the first set of waves. That's why people are afriad to swim in the ocean. They try to jump over those waves and get slammed down to the bottom and pulled across the sand like a piece of shell. You've got to go throught them, dive under just when they're rising up for you, set your direction, close your eyes, and just swim like hell. Once you get throught that, you'll find there isn't a better place for swimming because it's the ocean and it goes on forever. You don't have to see anyone if you don't want to. If you look out, away from the beach, it's easy to imagine that there's no one else but you in the whole world, you and maybe a couple of sea gulls."
Author: Ann Patchett
2. "You are lucky to be one of those people who wishes to build sand castles with words, who is willing to create a place where your imagination can wander. We build this place with the sand of memories; these castles are our memories and inventiveness made tangible. So part of us believes that when the tide starts coming in, we won't really have lost anything, because actually only a symbol of it was there in the sand. Another part of us thinks we'll figure out a way to divert the ocean. This is what separates artists from ordinary people: the belief, deep in our hearts, that if we build our castles well enough, somehow the ocean won't wash them away. I think this is a wonderful kind of person to be."
Author: Anne Lamott
3. "As I walked in the dark through the tunnels and tunnels of books, I could not help being overcome by a sense of sadness. I couldn't help thinking that if I, by pure chance. had found a whole universe in a single unknown book, buried in that endless necropolis, tens of thousands more would remain unexplored, forgotten forever. I felt myself surrounded by millions of abandoned pages, by worlds and souls without an owner sinking in an ocean of darkness, while the world that throbbed outside the library seemed to be losing its memory, day after day, unknowingly, feeling all the wiser the more it forgot."
Author: Carlos Ruiz Zafón
4. "What are heavy? sea-sand and sorrow.What are brief? today and tomorrow.What are frail? spring blossoms and youth.What are deep? the ocean and truth."
Author: Christina Rossetti
5. "The name Alaska is probably an abbreviation of Unalaska, derived from the original Aleut word agunalaksh, which means "the shores where the sea breaks its back." The war between water and land is never-ending. Waves shatter themselves in spent fury against the rocky bulwarks of the coast; giant tides eat away the sand beaches and alter the entire contour of an island overnight; williwaw winds pour down the side of a volcano like snow sliding off a roof, building to a hundred-mile velocity in a matter of minutes and churning the ocean into a maelstrom where the stoutest vessels founder."
Author: Corey Ford
6. "The children had had an argument once about whether there was more grass in the world or more sand, and Roger said that of course there must be more sand because of under the sea; in every ocean all over the world there would be sand, if you looked deep down. But there could be grass too, argued Deborah, a waving grass, a grass that nobody had ever seen, and the colour of that ocean grass would be darker than any grass on the surface of the world, in fields or prairies or people's gardens in America. It would be taller than tress and it would move like corn in the wind. ("The Pool"
Author: Daphne Du Maurier
7. "LinesI die but when the grave shall pressThe heart so long endeared to theeWhen earthy cares no more distressAnd earthy joys are nought to me.Weep not, but think that I have pastBefore thee o'er the sea of gloom.Have anchored safe and rest at lastWhere tears and mouring can not come.'Tis I should weep to leave thee hereOn that dark ocean sailing drearWith storms around and fears beforeAnd no kind light to point the shore.But long or short though life may be'Tis nothing to eternity.We part below to meet on highWhere blissful ages never die."
Author: Emily Brontë
8. "Each pregnant Oak ten thousand acorns formsProfusely scatter'd by autumnal storms;Ten thousand seeds each pregnant poppy shedsProfusely scatter'd from its waving heads;The countless Aphides, prolific tribe,With greedy trunks the honey'd sap imbibe;Swarm on each leaf with eggs or embryons big,And pendent nations tenant every twig ...—All these, increasing by successive birth,Would each o'erpeople ocean, air, and earth.So human progenies, if unrestrain'd,By climate friended, and by food sustain'd,O'er seas and soils, prolific hordes! would spreadErelong, and deluge their terraqueous bed;But war, and pestilence, disease, and dearth,Sweep the superfluous myriads from the earth...The births and deaths contend with equal strife,And every pore of Nature teems with Life;Which buds or breathes from Indus to the Poles,And Earth's vast surface kindles, as it rolls!"
Author: Erasmus Darwin
9. "Opening is an essential feature of univocity. The nomadic distributions or crowned anarchies in the univocal stand opposed to the sedentary distribution of analogy. Only there does the cry resound: ‘Everything is equal!' and ‘Everything returns!'. However, this ‘Everything is equal!' and ‘Everything returns!' can be said only at the point in which the extremity of difference is reached. A single and same voice for the whole thousand-voiced multiple, a single and same Ocean for all the drops, a single clamour of Being for all beings: on the condition that each being, each drop, and each voice has reached the state of excess – in other words, the difference which displaces and disguises them and, in turning upon the mobile cusp, causes them to return."
Author: Gilles Deleuze
10. "Circumambulate the city of a dreamy Sabbath afternoon. Go from Corlears Hook to Coenties Slip, and from thence, by Whitehall, northward. What do you see?—Posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries. Some leaning against the spiles; some seated upon the pier-heads; some looking over the bulwarks glasses! of ships from China; some high aloft in the rigging, as if striving to get a still better seaward peep. But these are all landsmen; of week days pent up in lath and plaster— tied to counters, nailed to benches, clinched to desks. How then is this? Are the green fields gone?"
Author: Herman Melville
11. "Where are you hiding my love?Each day without you will never come again.Even today you missed a sunset on the ocean,A silver shadow on yellow rocks I saved for you,A squirrel that ran across the road,A duck diving for dinner.My God! There may be nothing left to show youSave wounds and wearinessAnd hopes grown dead,And wilted flowers I picked for you a lifetime ago,Or feeble steps that cannot run to hold you,Arms too tired to offer you to a roaring wind,A face too wrinkled to feel the ocean's spray."
Author: James Kavanaugh
12. "Hold my hand, never let go.Be it tiring,be it painfulstill, hold me tight.Draw me closer to our dreams,sleep to every moment I'm awake,color my life with rainbowsand kiss me ---kiss me like there's no tomorrow.Touch my nose with yours,fill these gaps of my fingers,sing me the melody I so long to hearand together ---together we'll stand from the edge of forever,together we'll walk through the shores,together we'll sail the ocean upon all the oddsand right now, right therelove me ---love me like you never did", she said."
Author: Jelord Klinn Cabresos
13. "God doth not need either man's work or his own gifts, who best bear his milde yoak, they serve his best, his State is Kingly. Thousands at his bidding speed and post o're Land and Ocean without rest: they also serve who only stand and waite."
Author: John Milton
14. "Beannacht / BlessingOn the day whenthe weight deadenson your shouldersand you stumble,may the clay danceto balance you.And when your eyesfreeze behindthe grey windowand the ghost of lossgets in to you,may a flock of colours,indigo, red, green,and azure bluecome to awaken in youa meadow of delight.When the canvas fraysin the currach of thoughtand a stain of oceanblackens beneath you,may there come across the watersa path of yellow moonlightto bring you safely home.May the nourishment of the earth be yours,may the clarity of light be yours,may the fluency of the ocean be yours,may the protection of the ancestors be yours.And so may a slowwind work these wordsof love around you,an invisible cloakto mind your life."
Author: John O'Donohue
15. "I imagine a line, a white line, painted on the sand and on the ocean, from me to you."
Author: Jonathan Safran Foer
16. "Storms bring the detritus of other people's lives into our own, a reminder that we are not alone, and of how truly insignificant we are. The indiscriminating waves had brutalized the shore, tossing pieces of splintered timber, an intact china teacup, and a gentleman's watch—still with its cover and chain—onto my beloved beach, each coming to rest as if placed gently in the sand as a shopkeeper would display his wares. As I rubbed my thumb over the smooth lip of the china cup, I thought of how someone's loss had become my gain, of how the tide would roll in and out again as if nothing had changed, and how sometimes the separation between endings and beginnings is so small that they seem to run together like the ocean's waves."
Author: Karen White
17. "I look to the right as I cross the bridge and smile to see the tip of the Eiffel Tower soaring over rooftops in the distance on the other side of the river. I've seen it in photographs a thousand times, but seeing it in person for the first time that reminds me that I'm really, truly here, thousands of miles away, across an ocean from home."
Author: Kristin Harmel
18. "As the sun shines low and red across the water, I wade into the ocean. The water is still high and brown and murky with the memory of the storm, so if there's something below it, I won't know it. But that's part of this, the not knowing. The surrender to the possibilities beneath the surface. It wasn't the ocean that killed my father, in the end. The water is so cold that my feet go numb almost at once. I stretch my arms out to either side of me and close my eyes. I listen to the sound of water hitting water. The raucous cries of the terns and the guillemots in the rocks of the shore, the piercing, hoarse questions of the gulls above me. I smell seaweed and fish and the dusky scent of the nesting birds onshore. Salt coats my lips, crusts my eyelashes. I feel the cold press against my body. The sand shifts and sucks out from under my feet in the tide. I'm perfectly still. The sun is red behind my eyelids. The ocean will not shift me and the cold will not take me."
Author: Maggie Stiefvater
19. "...like a grain of sand that gets into an oyster's shell. What if the grain doesn't want to become a pearl? Is it ever asked to climb out quietly and take up its old position as a bit of ocean floor?"
Author: Robin McKinley
20. "IGNORANCEI didn't know love would make me thiscrazy, with my eyeslike the river Ceyhuncarrying me in its rapidsout to sea,where every bitof shattered boatsinks to the bottom.An alligator lifts its head and swallowsthe ocean, then the oceanfloor becomesa desert coveringthe alligator insand drifts.Changes dohappen. I do not know how,or what remains of whathas disappearedinto the absolute.I hear so many storiesand explanations, but I keep quiet,because I don't know anything,and because something I swallowedin the oceanhas made me completely contentwith ignorance."
Author: Rumi
21. "You are sitting here with us,but you are also out walking in a field at dawn.You are yourself the animal we huntwhen you come with us on the hunt.You are in your bodylike a plant is solid in the ground,yet you are wind.You are the diver's clotheslying empty on the beach.You are the fish.In the ocean are many bright strandsand many dark strands like veins that are seenwhen a wing is lifted up.Your hidden self is blood in those,those veins that are lute stringsthat make ocean music,not the sad edge of surf,but the sound of no shore."
Author: Rumi
22. "She wishes her grandmother had not been so protective, and that she understood better what passes between a man and woman. As it is, she simply enjoys the feelings and wonders if they are what lightning is made of, for everything comes back to the weather. Tears like rain. Smiles like the sun. Hair as dry as sand and fear like the dark ocean."
Author: Sara Sheridan
23. "During the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, winds were past 200 miles per house and people caught outside were sandblasted to death. Rescue workers found nothing but their shoes and belt buckles… In 1938, the hurricane put downtown Providence, Rhode Island, under 10 feet of ocean. The waves generated by that storm were so huge that they literally shook the earth; seismographs in Alaska picked up their impact 5,000 miles away."
Author: Sebastian Junger
24. "When my toes are sunk into warm sand and the ocean is lapping my feet, when I breathe in the scent of salt and hear the cry of a seagull, I know that I am returned to a place of restoration. I am home.I can heal here."
Author: Toni Sorenson
25. "The sand was smooth. The damp morning fog had hardened its top layer and the heat of the day had set it so that with every footstep the surface cracked, the crunch almost audible. The heels and balls of their shoes made a path of shallow divots, but it was far easier to walk on than the usual loose and gritty beach. In minutes, the wind worked to sweep their footprints clean and offer a flat, clear expanse all the way to the ocean where the sand became wet and sparkled invitingly with seawater."
Author: Victoria Kahler

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St Michael's RC secondary sat on a promontory overlooking the town of Auchenlea. The choice of site was an indirect consequence of a past mistake in vocational guidance, leading someone who had a pathological hatred of children into town planning, rather than the more traditional field of teaching."
Author: Christopher Brookmyre

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