Top The Esa Quotes

Browse top 632 famous quotes and sayings about The Esa by most favorite authors.

Favorite The Esa Quotes

1. "I heard that Mayor Rivers' speeches are absolutely riveting," Ethan joked, winking. "Oh, definitely." My words were drenched in sarcasm. "I believe he called us strong, clever, and capable. There may even have been some irreplaceable, brilliant, and extraordinary thrown in there as well. Most of the speech was one big, fake thesaurus recitation."
Author: Ada Adams
2. "Librarians who are arguing and lobbying for clever ebook lending solutions are completely missing the point. They are defending library as warehouse as opposed to fighting for the future, which is librarian as producer, concierge, connector, teacher and impresario."
Author: Alan Bennett
3. "She had the underwear of a thirteen-year-old, as well, he thought. He glanced back at her. But the shoes of a courtesan."
Author: Anne Stuart
4. "Then you may have sheer clotted nonsense; I once chased Julius Caesar all over London to get his recipe for curried eggs."
Author: Arthur Machen
5. "I was especially riveted by an amateur photograph in Herrero's book, taken late at night by a camper with a flash at a campground out West. The photograph caught four black bears as they puzzled over a suspended food bag. The bears were clearly startled but not remotely alarmed by the flash. It was not the size or demeanor of the bears that troubled me — they looked almost comically unagressive, like four guys who had gotten a Frisbee caught up a tree — but their numbers. Up to that moment it had not occurred to me that bears might prowl in parties. What on earth would I do if four bears came into my camp? Why, I would die, of course. Literally shit myself lifeless. I would blow my sphincter out my backside like one of those unrolling paper streamers you get at children's parties — I daresay it would even give a merry toot — and bleed to a messy death in my sleeping bag."
Author: Bill Bryson
6. "How DARE you and the rest of your barbarians set fire to my library? Play conqueror all you want, Mighty Caesar! Rape, murder, pillage thousands, even millions of human beings! But neither you nor any other barbarian has the right to destroy one human thought!"
Author: Caesar
7. "Things change so quickly. Just when you get used to something, zap! Itchanges. Just when you begin to understand someone, zap! They grow up. Thesame is happening with Katie. She changes every day; her face just becomes somuch more grown-up every time I look at her. Sometimes I have to stop pretendingI'm interested in what she's saying in order to realize that I actually aminterested. We go shopping for clothes together and I take her advice, we eatout for lunch and giggle over silly things. I just can't cast my mind back to thetime when my child stopped being a child and became a person."
Author: Cecelia Ahern
8. "Believe it or not, my best meal is to go to the store and buy a DiGiorno pizza, come home, add some fresh Parmesan cheese, and just hang with my family!"
Author: Cheyenne Jackson
9. "After I had the Caesarean, I was told I had really strong stomach muscles and so would heal very quickly. And I did. I was up walking about within three hours. Six days after having her, I was out shopping and shortly after that I made it to David Walliams' wedding."
Author: Denise Van Outen
10. "One morning as I closed the cyclone-fence gate / to begin a slow drift / down to the cookhouse on foot / (because my truck wheels were glued / in deep mud once again), / I walked straight into / the waiting non-arms of a snake, / its tan beaded-bag skin / studded with black diamonds.Up it coiled to speak to me a eye level. / Imagine! that sleek finger / rising out of the land's palm / and coiling faster than a Hindu rope. / The thrill of a bull snake / startled in the morning / when the mesas lie pooled / in a custard of light / kept me bright than ball lightning all day.Praise leapt first to mind / before flight or danger, / praise that knows no half-truth, and pardons all."
Author: Diane Ackerman
11. "Every moment of the nightForever changing placesAnd they put out the star-lightWith the breath from their pale faces"
Author: Edgar Allan Poe
12. "Benedicto: May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through pastoral valleys tinkling with bells, past temples and castles and poets towers into a dark primeval forest where tigers belch and monkeys howl, through miasmal and mysterious swamps and down into a desert of red rock, blue mesas, domes and pinnacles and grottos of endless stone, and down again into a deep vast ancient unknown chasm where bars of sunlight blaze on profiled cliffs, where deer walk across the white sand beaches, where storms come and go as lightning clangs upon the high crags, where something strange and more beautiful and more full of wonder than your deepest dreams waits for you -- beyond that next turning of the canyon walls."
Author: Edward Abbey
13. "A power of Butterfly must be -The Aptitude to flyMeadows of Majesty concedesAnd easy Sweeps of Sky -"
Author: Emily Dickinson
14. "There's green eyes in my eyesAnd a lover on my mindAnd I sing from the pianoTear my yellow dress andCry and cry and cryOver the love of you"
Author: Florence Welch
15. "The boys from Staten Island would fill more body bags than Stuyvesant could ever imagine. Mechanics and plumbers had to fight while college students shook indignant fists, fornicated in the fields of Woodstock and sat in."
Author: Frank McCourt
16. "How you are in this place that has been sealed since the time of Caesar Augustus?" one of the archaeologists demanded in amazement."I was looking for my sister," Dan quipped."Your sister?""Oh—here she is." Dan reached through the opening and hauled out an equally grubby Amy."
Author: Gordon Korman
17. "Crowds exhibit a docile respect for force, And are but slightly impressed by kindness, Which for them is scarcely other than a form of weakness. Their sympathies have never been bestowed upon easy going masters, but the tyrants who vigorously oppressed them. It is to these latter that they always erect the loftiest statues. It is true that they willingly trample on the despot whom they have stripped of his power, but it is because having lost his power he resumes his place among the feeble who are to be despised because they are not to be feared. The type of hero dear to a crowd will always have the semblance of a Caesar, His insignia attract them, His authority overawes them, and his sword instils them with fear."
Author: Gustave Le Bon
18. "I searched for my own heartand long after I had lost my wayin the days trailing past with their foliagein the aloof sky blue with distanceI thought I'd find my heartwhere I'd kept your eyes two brown butterfliesand I saw the swallows swoopand shadows starlings"
Author: Ingrid Jonker
19. "I really enjoyed hearing the likesand dislikesof my readers at book clubs as well as meeting new fans at the book signing at The Bookworm in Omaha " he said. "The book clubs have overwhelmingly asked me to hurry up on writing the sequel."
Author: J. Alexander Greenwood
20. "Don't blind yourself, demon. He fought for the same cause, thesame war. It was just a different battle." - Jenna Jenson"
Author: J.L. Sheppard
21. "She's always getting into trouble because she gets bored really really easily. [...]My mum says it's because Celia has an attention span the size of a sesame seed. Celia's mum says it's because Celia's identity is unfurling itself slowly, like a tulip bud, and it's a breathtakingly beautiful thing to see."
Author: Jaclyn Moriarty
22. "QuicksandsDemons and WondersWinds and TidesYet in the distance the sea haswithdrawnDemons and WondersWinds and TidesAnd youLike a seaweed the wind gentlycaressesIn the sands of your bed you'removing dreamingDemons and WondersWinds and TidesYet in the distance the sea haswithdrawnBut in your half-opened eyesTwo small waves staidDemons and WondersWinds and TidesTwo small waves to drown myself."
Author: Jacques Prévert
23. "I am not a scientist. I am, rather, an impresario of scientists."
Author: Jacques Yves Cousteau
24. "But though there were different names for God in all the different languages in the world and God understood what all the people whoprayed said in their different languages still God remained always thesame God and God's real name was God."
Author: James Joyce
25. "We went to Big Sur about three years ago and hung out at the Esalen Institute."
Author: Jeff Ament
26. "Ramfis fled the country after Trujillo's death, lived dissolutely off his father's swag, and ended up dying in a car crash of his own devising in 1969; the other car he hit contained the Duchess of Albuquerque, Teresa Beltrán de Lis, who died instantly; Lil'Fuckface went on murdering right to the end."
Author: Junot Díaz
27. "But I'd far rather live without souls or morals than Parmesan."
Author: Kate Quinn
28. "I was an intruder, at best a visitor, and would be even in my home, in my misremembered history, until the glow of phosphorescence in the Chesapeake I had longed to swim inside again someday became a taunt against my insignificance, a cruel trick of light that had always made me think of stars. No more. I gave up longing, because I was sure that anything seen at such a scale would reveal the universe as cast aside and drowned, and if I ever floated there again, out where the level of the water reached my neck, and my feet lost contact with its muddy bottom, I might realize that to understand the world, one's place in it, is to be always at the risk of drowning."
Author: Kevin Powers
29. "And what I think is thatwhen you're completely aloneand deep inside yourselfwith feelings no one else can understand,there really aren't a hundred places to go. It's like if I woke up one dayand looked outside and saw purple treesand red grass and green dogs,is there anyone I could tell who would understand? No.There'd be no one.It's exactly like that. He saw purple treesand red grass and green dogswhile no one else did.   And maybe, he just got tiredof seeing them."
Author: Lisa Schroeder
30. "Postremo pereunt imbres, ubi eos pater aether in gremium matris terrai praecipitavit;at nitidae surgunt fruges ramique virescuntarboribus, crescunt ipsae fetuque gravantur.hinc alitur porro nostrum genus atque ferarum,hinc laetas urbes pueris florere videmus frondiferasque novis avibus canere undique silvas,hinc fessae pecudes pinguis per pabula laetacorpora deponunt et candens lacteus umoruberibus manat distentis, hinc nova prolesartubus infirmis teneras lasciva per herbas ludit lacte mero mentes perculsa novellas.haud igitur penitus pereunt quaecumque videntur,quando alit ex alio reficit natura nec ullamrem gigni patitur nisi morte adiuta aliena."
Author: Lucretius
31. "There he is, bent over the page, with a monocle in his right eye, wholly devoted to the noble but rugged task of ferreting out the error. He has already promised himself to write a little monograph in which he will relate the finding of the book and the discovery of the error, if there really is one hidden there. In the end, he discovers nothing and contents himself with possession of the book. He closes it, gazes at it, gazes at it again, goes to the window and holds it in the sun. The only copy! At this moment a Caesar or a Cromwell passes beneath his window, on the road to power and glory. He turns his back, closes the window, stretches in his hammock, and fingers the leaves of the book slowly, lovingly, tasting it sip by sip...An only copy!"
Author: Machado De Assis
32. "Or on retiring to Prunesquallors' he might take down one of the Doctor's many books and read, for these days a passion to accumulate knowledge of any and every kind consumed him; but only as a means to an end. He must know all things, for only so might he have, when situations arose in the future, a full pack of cards to play from. He imagined himself occasions when the conversation of one from who he foresaw advancement might turn to astronomy, metaphysics, history, chemistry, or literature, and he realized that to be able to drop into the argument a lucid and exact thought, an opinion based on what might *appear* to be a life-time study, would instantaneously gain more for him than waiting until the conversation turned upon what lay within his scope of experience."
Author: Mervyn Peake
33. "MT [Mother Teresa] was not a friend of the poor. She was a friend of poverty. She said that suffering was a gift from God. She spent her life opposing the only known cure for poverty, which is the empowerment of women and the emancipation of them from a livestock version of compulsory reproduction."
Author: MT
34. "Carrying his books from one life into the next was nothing new to Zuckerman. He had left his family for Chicago in 1949 carrying in his suitcase the annotated works of Thomas Wolfe and Roget's Thesaurus. Four years later, age twenty, he left Chicago with five cartons of classics, bought secondhand out of his spending money, to be stored in his parents' attic while he served two years in the Army. In 1960, when he was divorced from Betsy, there were thirty cartons to be packed from the shelves no longer his; in 1965, when he was divorced from Virginia, there were just under sixty to cart away; in 1969, he left Bank Street with eighty-one boxes of books."
Author: Philip Roth
35. "But we do need a breather. We do need knowledge. And perhaps in a thousand years we might pick smaller cliffs to jump off. The books are to remind us what asses and fools we are. They're Caesar's praetorian guard, whispering as the parade roars down the avenue, ‘Remember, Caesar, thou art mortal.' Most of us can't rush around, talk to everyone, know all the cities of the world, we haven't time, money or that many friends. The things you're looking for, Montag, are in the world, but the only way the average chap will ever see ninety-nine per cent of them is in a book."
Author: Ray Bradbury
36. "He(Prophet Muhammad) was Caesar and Pope in one; but he was Pope without Pope's pretensions, Caesar without the legions of Caesar: without a standing army, without a bodyguard, without a palace, without a fixed revenue; if ever any man had the right to say that he ruled by the right divine, it was Muhammad, for he had all the power without its instruments and without its supports."
Author: Reverend B. Smith
37. "Actors do have good and bad sides. It's because the passage down the birth canal distorts the face. People born by caesarean section are more symmetrical."
Author: Richard Griffiths
38. "GATHERING LEAVESSpades take up leavesNo better than spoons,And bags full of leavesAre light as balloons.I make a great noiseOf rustling all dayLike rabbit and deerRunning away.But the mountains I raiseElude my embrace,Flowing over my armsAnd into my face.I may load and unloadAgain and againTill I fill the whole shed,And what have I then?Next to nothing for weight,And since they grew dullerFrom contact with earth,Next to nothing for color.Next to nothing for use.But a crop is a crop,And who's to say whereThe harvest shall stop?"
Author: Robert Frost
39. "The Empress Sabina had long ago formed her own theory about the nonsense in travel books. No traveler, having gone to the expense and trouble of venturing where most civilized people were too sensible to go, was going to come home and admit that it had been a waste of time. Instead, he had to pronounce his destination to be full of strange wonders, like the elk with no knees that could be caught by sabotaging the tree against which it leaned when it slept (Julius Caesar) or the men from India who could wrap themselves in their own ears (reported by the elder Pliny, who seemed to have written down everything he was ever told), or the blue-skinned Britons (Julius Caesar again).Strangely, no traveler had ever brought one of these creatures home for inspection. Doubtless they were impossible to capture, or died on the journey, or the blue came off in the wash."
Author: Ruth Downie
40. "In the libraryI search for a good book.We have many books,says Mrs. Rose, the librarian,and ALL of them are good.Of course she says that. It's her job.But do I want to read about TrucksTrains and Transport? Or evenHorsesHouses and Hyenas?In the fiction cornerthere are pink boksfull of princessesand girls who want to be princessesand black booksabout bad boysand brave boysand brawny boys.Where is the bookabout a girlwhose poems don't rhymeand whose Granny is fading?Pearl, says Mrs. Rose, the bell has rung.I go back to classempty-handedempty headedempty-hearted."
Author: Sally Murphy
41. "So she tried all the magical passwords she could think of. "Abracadabra. Open sesame. Sim salabim. Alakazam. Hocus pocus. Voilà. Please."
Author: Shannon Hale
42. "The sidesaddle was designed to protect a maiden's virginity, while risking the maiden's neck. Rather much for rather little, I thought."
Author: Sheri S. Tepper
43. "Alright! You sir, you sir, how about a shave?Come and visit your good friend Sweeney.You sir, too sir? Welcome to the grave.I will have vengenance.I will have salvation.Who sir, you sir?No ones in the chair, Come on! Come on!Sweeney's. waiting. I want you bleeders.You sir! Anybody!Gentlemen now don't be shy!Not one man, no, nor ten men.Nor a hundred can assuage me.I will have you!And I will get him back even as he gloatsIn the meantime I'll practice on less honorable throats.And my Lucy lies in ashesAnd I'll never see my girl again.But the work waits!I'm alive at last!And I'm full of joy!"
Author: Stephen Sondheim
44. "In the days of Caesar, kings had fools and jesters. Now network presidents have anchormen."
Author: Ted Koppel
45. "Books bend space and time. One reason the owners of those aforesaid little rambling, poky secondhand bookshops always seem slightly unearthly is that many of them really are, having strayed into this world after taking a wrong turning in their own bookshops in worlds where it is considered commendable business practice to wear carpet slippers all the time and open your shop only when you feel like it."
Author: Terry Pratchett
46. "The theory is simple.Every boy, every man, is reallya bit of a golden retrieveror a big chocolate Lab.Watch any man's eyesat the bounce of a ball.His head tilts slightly sideways, just a hair,as a primitive focuscomes to life."
Author: Toby Barlow
47. "I know love is begun by time,And that I see, in passages of proof,Time qualifies the spark and fire of it.There lives within the very flame of loveA kind of wick or snuff that will abate it.And nothing is at a like goodness still.For goodness, growing to a pleurisy,Dies in his own too-much. That we would do,We should do when we would, for this "would" changesAnd hath abatements and delays as manyAs there are tongues, are hands, are accidents.And then this "should" is like a spendthrift sighThat hurts by easing."
Author: William Shakespeare
48. "Who will believe my verse in time to come,If it were fill'd with your most high deserts?Though yet, heaven knows, it is but as a tombWhich hides your life and shows not half your parts.If I could write the beauty of your eyesAnd in fresh numbers number all your graces,The age to come would say 'This poet lies:Such heavenly touches ne'er touch'd earthly faces.'So should my papers yellow'd with their ageBe scorn'd like old men of less truth than tongue,And your true rights be term'd a poet's rageAnd stretched metre of an antique song: But were some child of yours alive that time, You should live twice; in it and in my rhyme."
Author: William Shakespeare
49. "Who seeks for better of thee, sauce his palateWith thy most operant poison! What is here?Gold? yellow, glittering, precious gold? No, gods,I am no idle votarist: roots, you clear heavens!Thus much of this will make black white, foul fair,Wrong right, base noble, old young, coward valiant.Ha, you gods! why this? what this, you gods? Why, thisWill lug your priests and servants from your sides,Pluck stout men's pillows from below their heads:This yellow slaveWill knit and break religions, bless the accursed,Make the hoar leprosy adored, place thievesAnd give them title, knee and approbationWith senators on the bench: this is itThat makes the wappen'd widow wed again;"
Author: William Shakespeare
50. "When I do count the clock that tells the time,And see the brave day sunk in hideous night;When I behold the violet past prime,And sable curls all silver'd o'er with white;When lofty trees I see barren of leavesWhich erst from heat did canopy the herd,And summer's green all girded up in sheavesBorne on the bier with white and bristly beard,Then of thy beauty do I question make,That thou among the wastes of time must go,Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsakeAnd die as fast as they see others grow;And nothing 'gainst Time's scythe can make defenceSave breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence."
Author: William Shakespeare

The Esa Quotes Pictures

Quotes About The Esa
Quotes About The Esa
Quotes About The Esa

Today's Quote

For nothing bestializes a being like the taste for eternal happiness, the search for eternal happiness at any price, and mademoiselle Lucifer is that slut who never wanted to abandon eternal happiness."
Author: Antonin Artaud

Famous Authors

Popular Topics