Top The Fairies Quotes

Browse top 22 famous quotes and sayings about The Fairies by most favorite authors.

Favorite The Fairies Quotes

1. "Most humans were on one big island, to the fairies, and that island was adrift on a sea called I Totally Don't Care."
Author: Charlaine Harris
2. "In a utilitarian age, of all other times, it is a matter of grave importance that fairy tales should be respected."(Frauds on the Fairies, 1853)"
Author: Charles Dickens
3. "In fact, the fairies had turned him into a water-baby.A water-baby?  You never heard of a water-baby.  Perhaps not.  That is the very reason why this story was written.  (...)"But there are no such things as water-babies."How do you know that?  Have you been there to see?  And if you had been there to see, and had seen none, that would not prove that there were none.  If Mr. Garth does not find a fox in Eversley Wood—as folks sometimes fear he never will—that does not prove that there are no such things as foxes.  And as is Eversley Wood to all the woods in England, so are the waters we know to all the waters in the world.  And no one has a right to say that no water-babies exist, till they have seen no water-babies existing; which is quite a different thing, mind, from not seeing water-babies; and a thing which nobody ever did, or perhaps ever will do."
Author: Charles Kingsley
4. "The country people, indeed, did not always clearly distinguish between the Fairies and the dead. They called them both the 'Silent People'; and the Milky Way they thought was the path along which the dead were carried to Fairyland."
Author: Hope Mirrlees
5. "The fairies, as their custom, clapped their hands with delight over their cleverness, and they were so madly in love with the little house that they could not bear to think they had finished it."
Author: J.M. Barrie
6. "It is frightfully difficult to know much about the fairies, and almost the only thing for certain is that there are fairies wherever there are children."
Author: J.M. Barrie
7. "Seek out some retired and old-world spot, far from the madding crowd, and dream away a sunny week among its drowsy lanes - some half-forgotten nook, hidden away by the fairies, out of reach of the noisy world - some quaint-perched eyrie on the cliffs of Time, from whence the surging waves of the nineteenth century would sound far-off and faint."
Author: Jerome K. Jerome
8. "It wasn't that we didn't know history. Even if you only count the real world, we knew more history than most people. We'd been taught about cavemen and Normans and Tudors. We knew about Greeks and Romans. We knew masses of personal stories about World War II. We even knew quite a lot of family history. It just didn't connect to the landscape. And it was the landscape that formed us, that made us who we were as we grew in it, that affected everything. We thought we were living in a fantasy landscape when actually we were living in a science fictional one. In ignorance, we played our way through what the elves and giants had left us, taking the fairies' possession for ownership. I named the dramroads after places in The Lord of the Rings when I should have recognized that they were from The Chrysalids."
Author: Jo Walton
9. "My mother was a pathetic patchwork witch who had used magic so much to meddle in her own life that she had no integrity left and was nothing but a coil of hatreds consuming themselves in futility. We had already hedged her power, with the help of the fairies."
Author: Jo Walton
10. "People tell you to write what you know, but I've found that writing what you know is much harder than making it up. It's easier to research a historical period than your own life, and it's much easier to deal with things that have a little less emotional weight and where you have a little more detachment. It's terrible advice! So this is why you'll find there's no such place as the Welsh valleys, no coal under them, and no red buses running up and down them; there never was such a year as 1979, no such age as fifteen, and no such planet as Earth. The fairies are real, though."
Author: Jo Walton
11. "Quite a number of writers comment on the decidedly human character of the fairies, but it must be obvious that practically all supernaturals partake of human traits, more usually unpleasant ones, being as they are the projections of man's fear and imagination and created by him, psychologically, in his own image. Fairies are frequently described as being peevish, irritable, and revengeful to a degree. Grant Stewart says rather unmercifully of the Scottish fairies that "their appetites are as keen as their inclinations are corrupt and wicked."
Author: Lewis Spence
12. "Robert Kirk believed the fairies to be the doubles or, as he called them, the 'co-walkers' of men, which accompanied them through life, and thought that this co-walker returned to Faerie when the person died."
Author: Lewis Spence
13. "...some evidence seems to exist that an idea prevailed that in the fairy sphere there is a reversal of the seasons, our winter being their summer. Some such belief seems to have been known to Robert Kirk, for he tells us that 'when we have plenty they [the fairies] have scarcity at their homes.' In respect of the Irish fairies they seem to have changed their residences twice a year: in May, when the ancient Irish "flitted" from their winter houses to summer pastures, and in November, when they quitted these temporary quarters."
Author: Lewis Spence
14. "This brings me to the question of the antiquity of the belief in fairies and to the associated problem of the existence of strata or stages in fairy belief. The antiquity of the belief is revealed by the wide distribution of tales concerning fairies, while it is also indicated by the antipathy of the elves to iron and salt - ancient taboos both. Not only so, but many traits respecting fairies, especially shape-shifting and the belief in their semi-corporeal state, are eloquent of primitive notions. That the process of the fairy belief witnessed more than one stage of development in the course of successive ages appears more than probable. 'The fairies of one race,' remarks Wentz, 'are the people of the preceding race.' If this statement lacks a certain precision, one realizes the implication; that is, that the ghosts or gods of a preceding race may come to be regarded by their successors as fairies."
Author: Lewis Spence
15. "Some discussion of the nature and temperament of the fairies is necessary in view of its possible bearing on their origin. J. G. Campbell tells us that in the Highlands of Scotland they were regarded as "the counterparts of mankind, but substantial and unreal, outwardly invisible." They differ from mortals in the possession of magical power, but are strangely dependent in many ways on man. They are generally considered by the folk at large as of a nature between spirits and men. "They are," says Wentz, "a distinct race between our own and that of spirits."
Author: Lewis Spence
16. "I could hear you, talking to the daffodils and tulips, whispering to the fairies that lived inside their petals. Each separate flower had a different family inside it."
Author: Lucy Christopher
17. "... asparagus, tinged with ultramarine and rosy pink which ran from their heads, finely stippled in mauve and azure, through a series of imperceptible changes to their white feet, still stained a little by the soil of their garden-bed: a rainbow-loveliness that was not of this world. I felt that these celestial hues indicated the presence of exquisite creatures who had been pleased to assume vegetable form, who, through the disguise which covered their firm and edible flesh, allowed me to discern in this radiance of earliest dawn, these hinted rainbows, these blue evening shades, that precious quality which I should recognise again when, all night long after a dinner at which I had partaken of them, they played (lyrical and coarse in their jesting as the fairies in Shakespeare's Dream) at transforming my humble chamberpot into a bower of aromatic perfume."
Author: Marcel Proust
18. "A child, especially a lonely one, one hidden away, is sometimes permitted a glimpse of the little people who inhabit these remote places. These creatures shun the limelight and the intrusion of large humans, preferring to dance, in field and forest, by the light of the moon. Deep within the old forest of tall pines at the foot of the steep meadow below our house is a small clearing where the sun shines through onto the forest floor. It smells wonderful as the sun warms the dry pine needles that lie in a carpet several feet thick on the ground. As a little girl, I visited this spot every few weeks to make a house for the fairies who lived there. First, I'd form the castle wall of pine needles in a circle. Next, some smaller walls for separate rooms. In several, I'd put soft bits of green moss for beds and leaves for coverlets; in others, twigs for chairs and tables."
Author: Testy McTesterson
19. "Passion isn't a path through the woods. Passion is the woods. It's the deepest, wildest part of the forest; the grove where the fairies still dance and obscene old vipers snooze in the boughs. Everybody but the most dried up and dysfunctional is drawn to the grove and enchanted by its mysteries, but then they just can't wait to call in the chain saws and bulldozers and replace it with a family-style restaurant or a new S and L. That's the payoff, I guess. Safety. Security. Certainty. Yes, indeed. Well, remember this, pussy latte: we're not involved in a 'relationship,' you and I, we're involved in a collision. Collisions don't much lend themselves to secure futures..."
Author: Tom Robbins
20. "On Midsummer Eve, when the bonfires are lighted on every hill in honour of St. John, the fairies are at their gayest, and sometime steal away beautiful mortals to be their brides."
Author: W.B. Yeats
21. "O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you. . . .She is the fairies' midwife, and she comesIn shape no bigger than an agate stoneOn the forefinger of an alderman,Drawn with a team of little atomiAthwart men's noses as they lie asleep."
Author: William Shakespeare
22. "USURY: Everybody's looking for the job in which you never have to pay anyone their pound of flesh. Self-employed nirvana. A lot of artists like to think of themselves as uncompromising; a lot of management consultants won't tell you what they do until they've sunk five pints. I don't think anybody should give themselves air just because they don't have to hand over a pound of flesh every day at 5pm, and I don't think anyone should beat themselves with broken glass because they do. If you're an artist, well, good for you. Thank your lucky stars every evening and dance in the garden with the fairies. But don't fool yourself that you occupy some kind of higher moral ground. You have to work for that. Writing a few lines, painting a pretty picture - that just won't do it."
Author: Zadie Smith

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Premda zvuci kao ironija, ali cinjenica je da su sveucilišta stotine tisuca ljudi obucila za poslove koji ce uskoro jednostavno nestati.Obucila su ljude da održavaju ustroj koji se ne može održati. Elita, jednako kao i oni koji su stekli uske, specijalizirane, gotovo zanatske vještine, znaju jedino kako hraniti zvijer sve dok ne umre. A, kad jednom umre, ostat ce bespomocni. Ne ocekujte da ce nas spasiti. Ne znaju kako. Ne znaju cak ni kako postavljati valjana pitanja. A kad se sve uruši, kad naš truli financijski sustav s tim tisucama milijardi bezvrijedne aktive doživi imploziju i naši imperijalni ratovi završe poniženjem i porazom, elita mocnika razotkrit ce se kao bespomocna i samozaludena jednako kao i svi mi ostali."
Author: Chris Hedges

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