Top Wager Quotes

Browse top 62 famous quotes and sayings about Wager by most favorite authors.

Favorite Wager Quotes

1. "I wager that most human beings do five things a day they cannot logically explain."
Author: A.S. King
2. "Colleague, given that I'm detached to go hunting bandits, I'd be grateful for the continued loan of your horses until we return. A squadron of cavalry could make all the difference when we're chasing around the forests after shadows.'Licinius gave him a jaundiced look. ‘You've got sticky fingers, young man. Every soldier that comes into contact with your cohort seems to end up as part of it. Hamian archers, borrowed cavalrymen. I'll even wager you that the half-century of legionaries Dubnus borrowed from the Sixth will end up in your establishment. And yes, you can extend the loan if you think it'll do you any good, and you can keep that decurion you promoted to command them."
Author: Anthony Riches
3. "A well-read highwayman, who would have thought?" the dowager commented."Oh, he absolutely adores books. He plans to retire when he has enough money and furnish his library with hundreds of books. He has already started a collection by stealing all he can find off lords and such."
Author: Anya Wylde
4. "At the far end of this infinite distance a coin is being spun which will come down heads or tails. How will you wager? Reason cannot make you choose either, reason cannot prove either wrong."
Author: Blaise Pascal
5. "Once Incarceron became a dragon, and a Prisoner crawled into his lair. They made a wager. They would ask each other riddles, and the one who could not answer would lose. It it was the man, he would give his life. The Prison offered a secret way of Escape. But even as the man agreed, he felt its hidden laughter.They played for a year and a day. The lights stayed dark. The dead were not removed. Food was not provided. The Prison ignored the cries of its inmates.Sapphique was the man. He had one riddle left. He said, "What is the Key that unlocks the heart?"For a day Incarceron thought. For two days. For three. Then it said, "If I ever knew the answer, I have forgotten it."--Sapphique in the Tunnels of Madness"
Author: Catherine Fisher
6. "All of life is a wager"
Author: Christopher Hitchens
7. "All other trades are contained in that of war.Is that why war endures?No. It endures because young men love it and old men love it in them. Those that fought, those that did not.That's your notion.The judge smiled. Men are born for games. Nothing else. Every child knows that play is nobler than work. He knows too that the worth or merit of a game is not inherent in the game itself but rather in the value of that which is put at hazard. Games of chance require a wager to have meaning at all. Games of sport involve the skill and strength of the opponents and the humiliation of defeat and the pride of victory are in themselves sufficient stake because they inhere in the worth of the principals and define them. But trial of chance or trial of worth all games aspire to the condition of war for here that which is wagered swallows up game, player, all."
Author: Cormac McCarthy
8. "Her Majesty to the theatre. The performance took place on a stage erected in the courtyard, and Her Majesty closed in one part of her veranda for the use of the guests and Court ladies. During the performance I began to feel very drowsy, and eventually fell fast asleep leaning against one of the pillars. I awoke rather suddenly to find that something had been dropped into my mouth, but on investigation I found it was nothing worse than a piece of candy, which I immediately proceeded to eat. On approaching Her Majesty, she asked me how I had enjoyed the candy, and told me not to sleep, but to have a good time like the rest. I never saw Her Majesty in better humor. She played with us just like a young girl, and one could hardly recognize in her the severe Empress Dowager we knew her to be."
Author: Der Ling
9. "And I'll wager you thought him the handsomest thing that ever you saw in your life.""I did. And if you stuck him, and stuffed him, and hung him on the wall, I'd be very glad to admire him. But in life he's an arrogant pig, and I didn't care for him at all. ‘Mind who you look at, wench.' Foo!"
Author: Diane Stanley
10. "Nobody ever," said the Dowager sorrowfully, "credits me with normal thought processes. When a mysterious man creates a royal scandal on the banks of the Lake of Menteith with the keenest ears in Scotland strolling utterly oblivious—by her own account—in the locality, I begin to wonder. I also wonder when a delicately reared child sends a court into fits with a riddle which I invented myself."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
11. "Swirling furiously among the stairs and corridors of her exquisite home like a small and angry white bat Sybilla, Dowager Lady Culter, was not above spitting at her unfortunate son when he chose to sit down in his own great hall to take his boots off. ‘If Madge Mumblecrust comes down those stairs once again for a morsel of fowl's liver with ginger, or pressed meats with almond-milk, I shall retire to a little wicker house in the forest and cast spells which will sink Venice into the sea for ever, and Madame Donati with it. The Church,' said Sybilla definitely, ‘should excommunicate girls who do not replace lids on sticky jars and wash their hair every day with the best towels."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
12. "His leaf-gold tresses on end, his eyes in baskets from the long night without sleep, Phelim O'LiamRoe smacked his two fists together and cursed. The Queen Dowager, hardly aware of him, had turned her erect body to the window, followed by Margaret Erskine's wide eyes. But Michel Hérisson, who had arrived so unexpectedly on the Irishman's heels, ran his hacked and gouty hands through the wild white hair and said through his teeth, ‘Liam aboo, son, Liam aboo! My Gaelic's all out in holes, the way my arse is ridden out through my breeches; but if you are saying what I hope you are saying, Liam aboo, my son, Liam aboo!"
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
13. "Tais-toi. Your glove. Madame Erskine, procure me a large pin,' said the Queen Dowager of Scotland. ‘I have yet to meet a man who can lay hands on a pin when there is need for it."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
14. "Jerott, for God's sake! Are you doing this for a wager?' said Lymond, his patience gone at last. ‘What does anyone want out of life? What kind of freak do you suppose I am? I miss books and good verse and decent talk. I miss women, to speak to, not to rape; and children, and men creating things instead of destroying them. And from the time I wake until the time I find I can't go to sleep there is the void—the bloody void where there was no music today and none yesterday and no prospect of any tomorrow, or tomorrow, or next God-damned year."
Author: Dorothy Dunnett
15. "Sophia looked down her long nose at the girl. "Who are you?""I'm Abigail, ma'am," she said, curtsying. "This is my brother, Jamie. I apologize for him."Sophia arched an eyebrow. "I'll wager you do that quite a lot."Abigail sighed, sounding world-weary. "Yes, I do.""Good girl." Sophia almost smiled. "Younger brothers can be a chore sometimes, but one must persevere.""Yes, ma'am," Abigail said solemnly."Come on, Jamie," Alistair said. "Let's go into dinner before they form a Society for Bossy Older Sisters."
Author: Elizabeth Hoyt
16. "And the flames are every colour of the rainbow.""They can't be," observed Daffy."Well, they are," she said cheekily. "Have you been there, that you know so much about it?""No," said Daffy, very calm, "but I'd wager I know more than you about the chemical processes of combustion."Mary rolled her eyes. Did he hope to dazzle her with syllables?"
Author: Emma Donoghue
17. "O Voltaire! O humanity! O idiocy! There is something ticklish in "the truth," and in the SEARCH for the truth; and if man goes about it too humanely—"il ne cherche le vrai que pour faire le bien"—I wager he finds nothing!"
Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
18. "You haven't said yet weather I may help you while I am here"Elnora hesitated.You better say 'yes,'" he persisted. It would be a real kindness. It would keep me out doors all day and give an incentive to work. I'm good at it. I'll show you if I am not in a week or so. I can 'sugar' manipulate lights, and mirrors, and all the expert methods. I'll wager moths are think int the old swamp over there"They are," said Elnora. "Most I have I took there. A few nights ago my mother caught a good many, but we don't dare go alone"All the more reason why you need me. Where do you live? I can't get an answer from you, I'll just go tell your mother who I am and ask her if I may help you. I warn you young lady, I have a very effective way with mothers. They almost never turn me down."Then it's probable you will have a new experience when you meet mine," said Elnora. "She never was known to do what anyone expected she surely would."
Author: Gene Stratton Porter
19. "Mrs. Cadwallader said, privately, 'You will certainly go mad in that house alone, my dear. You will see visions. We have all got to exert ourselves a little to keep sane, and call things by the same names as other people call them by. To be sure, for younger sons and women who have no money, it is a sort of provision to go mad: they are taken care of then. But you must not run into that. I daresay you are a little bored here with our good dowager; but think what a bore you might become yourself to your fellow-creatures if you were always playing tragedy queen and taking things sublimely. Sitting alone in that library at Lowick you may fancy yourself ruling the weather; you must get a few people round you who wouldn't believe you if you told them. That is a good lowering medicine."
Author: George Eliot
20. "Lord Snow wants to take my place now.' He sneered. 'I'd have an easier time teaching a wolf to juggle than you will training this aurochs.''I'll take that wager, Ser Alliser', Jon said. 'I'd love to see Ghost juggle."
Author: George R.R. Martin
21. "There, at the top of the table, alone amongst all these women, stooped over his ample plateful, with his napkin tied around his neck like a child, an old man sat eating, drips of gravy drbibbling gravy from him lips. His eyes were bloodshot and he had a little pigtail tied up with a black ribbon. This was the Marquis' father-in-law... he had led a... Read more tumultuous life of debauchery and duelling, of wagers made and women abducted, had squandered his fortune and terrified his whole family... Emma's eyes kept coming back to this old man with the sagging lips, as though to something wonderfully majestic. He had lived at court and slept in the bed of a queen!"
Author: Gustave Flaubert
22. "The dowager said, "I was tremendously struck by what you said at the gym the other day. About powerlessness. About how powerlessness inflicts such damage on people. Do you remember?" Aomame nodded. "I do." "Do you mind if I ask you a question? It will be a very direct question. To save time." "Ask whatever you like," Aomame said. "Are you a feminist, or a lesbian?" Aomame blushed slightly and shook her head. "I don't think so. My thoughts on such matters are strictly my own. I'm not a doctrinaire feminist, and I'm not a lesbian."
Author: Haruki Murakami
23. "Walking to the subway, Aomame kept thinking about the strangeness of the world. If, as the dowager had said, we were nothing but gene carriers, why do so many of us have to lead such strangely shaped lives? Wouldn't our genetic purpose – to transmit DNA – be served just as well if we lived simple lives, not bothering our heads with a lot of extraneous thoughts, devoted entirely to preserving life and procreating? Did it benefit the genes in any way for us to lead such intricately warped, even bizarre, lives?… how could it possibly profit the genes to have such people existing in this world? Did the genes merely enjoy such deformed episodes as colorful entertainment, or were these episodes utilized by them for some greater purpose?"
Author: Haruki Murakami
24. "I can't imagine finding anybody to take your place.""You might not find a person that easily, but you could probably find a way without too much trouble," Aomama noted.The dowager looked at Aomame calmly, her lips forming a satisfied smile. "That may be true," she said, "but I almost surely could never find anthing to take the place of what we are sharing here and now. You are you and only you. I'm very grateful for that. More grateful than I can say."
Author: Haruki Murakami
25. "If, as the dowager had said, we are nothing but gene carriers, why do so many of us have to lead such strangely shaped lives? Wouldn't our genetic purpose—to transmit DNA—be served just as well if we lived simple lives, not bothering our heads with a lot of extraneous thoughts, devoted entirely to preserving life and procreating? Did it benefit the genes in any way for us to lead such intricately warped, even bizarre, lives?"
Author: Haruki Murakami
26. "Gregory picks up his little dog. He hugs her, and nuzzles the fur at the back of her neck. He waits. ‘Rafe and Richard say that when my education is sufficient you mean to marry me to some old dowager with a great settlement and black teeth, and she will wear me out with lechery and rule me with her whims, and she will leave her estate away from the children she has and they will hate me and scheme against my life and one morning I shall be dead in my bed.'The spaniel swivels in his son's arms, turns on him her mild, round, wondering eyes. ‘They are making sport of you, Gregory. If I knew such a woman, I would marry her myself."
Author: Hilary Mantel
27. "I suspect you're thinking of Pascal,' Finkler said, finally.'Only he said the opposite. He said you might as well wager on God because that way, even if He doesn't exist, you've nothing to lose. Whereas if you wager against God and He does exist...' 'You're in the shit."
Author: Howard Jacobson
28. "She drew in a huge breath and let it out all at once. "I never thought anyone would want me."Such plain, simple words, and so eloquent a declaration. In that moment he shared all the pain, all the insecurities of an awkward lass made to believe she was worthless to any man but a feckless father who preferred whisky and wagers to pride in himself and his daughter.He reached out and caught her hand, fingered it gently, then carried her hand to his mouth and kissed her palm. "I want you," he said.This time when she cried he knew it was for joy."
Author: Jennifer Roberson
29. "A few years ago, Tor Wager, a neuroscientist at Columbia University, wanted to figure out why placebos were so effective. His experiment was brutally straightforward: he gave college students electric shocks while they were stuck in an fMRI machine. (The subjects were well compensated, at least by undergraduate standards.)"
Author: Jonah Lehrer
30. "A true Englishman doesn't joke when he is talking about so serious a thing as a wager."
Author: Jules Verne
31. "I'd wager you have a vengeful streak a mile wide," he muttered."I am the least vengeful person I know," she said with a sniff. "And if you think otherwise, then perhaps you ought not to marry me.""You're marrying me," he ground out, "if I have to drag you to the altar bound and gagged."Ellie smiled waspishly. "You could try," she taunted, "but in your condition you couldn't drag a flea.""And you say you're not vengeful.""I seem to be developing a taste for it."
Author: Julia Quinn
32. "She inched forward, although she wasn't sure why. If the dowager started spouting off about the highwayman and his resemblance to her favorite son, it wasn't as if she would be able to stop her. But still, the proximity at least gave the illusion that she might be able to prevent disaster."
Author: Julia Quinn
33. "And I hope you will not think me foolish when I also extend my thanks.Thank you, Michael, for letting my son love her first.—from Janet Stirling, dowager Countess of Kilmartin, to Michael Stirling, Earl of Kilmartin"
Author: Julia Quinn
34. "Five years with the dowager - Good God, she ought to be given a title in her own right as a penance for such as that. No one had done more for England."
Author: Julia Quinn
35. "Is my gardener's pride to be sacrificed on the altar of Mr Molesley's ambitions?- The Dowager Countess(Maggie Smith)"
Author: Julian Fellowes
36. "I find you too charming by half.""And I find you too annoying by far. If you do not release me, I cannot be held responsible for your well-being."He chuckled at that. "A fiery little bundle,aren't you? I'll wager you like-"She brought her foot down hard on his instep.He yelped and released her, his face contorted in pain.Sophia stepped past him, but he grabbed her arm and yanked her back toward him. "You tease!" he gasped.She used her forward motion to shove him back against the settee.One moment, he was standing before her; the next, he was lying upside down on the rug behind the setee, his legs in the air.Sophia gathered her skirts and ran for the door. She was only steps away when it flew open and Dougal stood in the opening.He was dressed in his riding clothes, and she couldn't help but compare his elegance with Sir Reginald's flashy attire, with his exaggerated riding coat and gaudy gold-tassled boots-which were sill waving in the air."
Author: Karen Hawkins
37. "And you always do your duty. Doesn't it ever get boring? I think that's why you're so attracted to me, because I've shaken your reasonable, rational, ordered life. I'd wager that you've felt more excitement with me in the last week than in centuries."That hit far too close to home. "And I think I've never known anyone as egotistical as you.""Egotistical? Try self-confident. Should I be meek instead? Would you like me better then?"
Author: Kresley Cole
38. "I have a plan," he said."Yes," she said."Let's get married," he said."Yes," she said."Let's conquer the world," he said."Yes," she said. No one in her family had ever been accused of dreaming small."Let's bring the beau monde to its knees.""Yes.""Let's make them beg for your creations.""Yes," she said. "Yes, yes, yes.""Is tomorrow too soon?" he said."No." she said. "We've a great deal to do, you and I, conquering the world. We must start at once. We've not a minute to lose.""I love hearing you say that," he said.He kissed her. It lasted a long time. And they would last, she was sure, a lifetime. On that she'd wager anything."
Author: Loretta Chase
39. "She should let one of the gentlemen with their little wager and steal a kiss. That would help her cause far more than beating them.But what if Mr. Pinter won? What if he kissed her as he had last night? It would be just the sort of thing he'd do, to put off her suitors by making it appear she had an interest elsewhere. That perhaps he had an interest in her, too.Perhaps he does.She snorted. The only interest he had was in ruining her life. He still reported to her about her suitors. He would much rather be here, trying to upset all her plans, than doing his job.He shot well, though. She'd give him that. The man knew his way around a firearm."
Author: Sabrina Jeffries
40. "Ralston stiffened at the reference to the stupid wager that caused so much pain and unhappiness. He ignored Oxford's proffered hand, and instead met the baron's concerned gaze, and said, "Keep the money. I have her. She's all I want."
Author: Sarah MacLean
41. "Saint took a seat at the main faro table at the Society club. "What the devil is a ladies' political tea?"Tristan Carroway, Viscount Dare, finished placing his wager, then sat back, reaching for his glass ofport. "Do I look like a dictionary?""You're domesticated." Saint motioned for a glass of his own, despite unfriendly looks from the tables'other players. "What is it?""I'm not domesticated; I'm in love. You should try it. Does wonders for your outlook on life.""I'll take your word for it, thank you."
Author: Suzanne Enoch
42. "So you intend to spend the remainder of your life whoring, drinking, wagering, and being as outrageous as you can manage?"Bram shook himself. He made it a point to be serious as little as possible, and neither did he want to argue with two newly married men about the meruts of being leg-shackled."Please Phin," he said aloud. "I would never think so small. You know my ultimate goal is to lower the standards of morality enough that everything I do becomes acceptable."
Author: Suzanne Enoch
43. "Wager: It's good to see you smiling.Connor: There's not a whole hell of a lot to smile about. Some freak of nature attacked me today, my best friend has run off with the key, and I need to get laid."
Author: Sylvia Day
44. "Maybe it is like Pascal's Wager, but I want to believe in the immortality of the soul because consciousness is such a fantastic gift that is feels cruel and unfair to end it so quickly."
Author: Thomm Quackenbush
45. "Caelum goes: "There have been studies done on this topic, gentlemen. You could wager a bet and look it up." Caelum always talks like someone's dad when he's high."
Author: Tiffanie DeBartolo
46. "My, how foolish I am!" my friend cries, suddenly alert, like a woman remembering too late she has biscuits in the over. "You know what I've always thought?" She asks in a tone of discovery, and not smiling at me but at a point beyond. "I've always thought a body would have to be sick and dying before they saw the Lord. And I imagined that when He came it would be like looking at the Baptist window; pretty as colored glass with the sun pouring through, such a shrine you don't know it's getting dark. And it's been a comfort: to think of that shine taking away all the spooky feeling. But I'll wager it never happens. I'll wager at the very end a body realizes that the Lord has already shown Himself. That things as they are" – her hand circles in a gesture that gathers clouds and kites and grass and Queenie pawing earth over bone – "just what they've always seen, was seeing Him. As for me, I could leave the world with today in my eyes."
Author: Truman Capote
47. "The Adoption When Paul Jobs was mustered out of the Coast Guard after World War II, he made a wager with his crewmates. They had arrived in San Francisco, where their ship was decommissioned, and Paul bet that he would find himself a wife within two weeks. He was a taut, tattooed engine mechanic, six feet tall, with a passing resemblance to James Dean. But it wasn't his looks that got him a date"
Author: Walter Isaacson
48. "What Pascal overlooked was the hair-raising possibility that God might out-Luther Luther. A special area in hell might be reserved for those who go to mass. Or God might punish those whose faith is prompted by prudence. Perhaps God prefers the abstinent to those who whore around with some denomination he despises. Perhaps he reserves special rewards for those who deny themselves the comfort of belief. Perhaps the intellectual ascetic will win all while those who compromised their intellectual integrity lose everything.There are many other possibilities. There might be many gods, including one who favors people like Pascal; but the other gods might overpower or outvote him, à la Homer. Nietzsche might well have applied to Pascal his cutting remark about Kant: when he wagered on God, the great mathematician 'became an idiot."
Author: Walter Kaufmann
49. "HAMLET I will receive it sir with all diligence of spirit. Put your bonnet to his right use, 'tis for the head.OSRIC I thank you lordship, it is very hot.HAMLET No believe me, 'tis very cold, the wind is northerly.OSRIC It is indifferent cold my lord, indeed.HAMLET But yet methinks it is very sultry and hot for my complexion.OSRIC Exceedingly my lord, it is very sultry, as 'twere - I cannot tell how. But my lord, his majesty bade me signify to you that a has laid a great wager on your head. Sir, this is the matter -HAMLET I beseech you remember.(Hamlet moves him to put on his hat)"
Author: William Shakespeare
50. "Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hourDraws on apace; four happy days bring inAnother moon: but, O, methinks, how slowThis old moon wanes! she lingers my desires,Like to a step-dame or a dowagerLong withering out a young man revenue."
Author: William Shakespeare

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