Top Witchcraft Crucible Quotes

Browse top 26 famous quotes and sayings about Witchcraft Crucible by most favorite authors.

Favorite Witchcraft Crucible Quotes

1. "And here, she said to herself, is the victim of the witch hunt, or its modern equivalent. Not much has changed. Witchcraft or sexual harassment: the tactics of persecution were much the same - the loathed enemy was identified and then demonised."
Author: Alexander McCall Smith
2. "Look, this job has always been a crucible of conflict."
Author: Bruce Babbitt
3. "Witchcraft isn't about picking up a book, and asking forgiveness.. or learning about spirituality through the words of others. What you learn from those books are the opinions of other people, and not your own. If this is what you believe then you are not an individual. Witchcraft is about accepting that YOU are responsible for the choices that YOU have made, and YOU teaching YOURSELF to make the right choices. Its about learning through YOUR OWN opinions, YOUR OWN life lessons, YOUR OWN inner self, and by doing so.. BECOME an individual."
Author: Carla VanKoughnett
4. "I have to get stronger, harder, and faster. The only way to get hard enough to walk the Apocalypse Road is in the crucible of battle."
Author: Cedric Nye
5. "Wisdom that isn't distilled in our own crucible can't help us."
Author: Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
6. "In the Scotland of the early seventeenth century, an old woman living alone in Kirkcudbrightshire was accused of witchcraft and on conviction was rolled downhill in a blazing tar barrel. One of the charges against her was that she walked withershins round a well near her cottage which was used by other people. The well was afterwards known as the Witch's Well. These episodes must surely serve as cautionary tales to anyone tempted to transgress the usual custom of walking deasil round a holy well."
Author: Colin Bord
7. "Matthew kept hinting that his desire - for blood, chiefly- was so strong that it put everything else at risk. But vampires weren't the only creatures who had to manage such strong impulses. Much of what qualified as magic was simply desire in action. Witchcraft was different- that took spells and rituals. But magic? A wish, a need, a hunger too strong to be denied- these could turn into deeds when they cross a witch's mind."
Author: Deborah Harkness
8. "More accustomed to relying upon himself to shape events, he took the greatest control of the process leading up to the nomination, displaying a fierce ambition, an exceptional political acumen, and a wide range of emotional strengths, forged in the crucible of personal hardship, that took his unsuspecting rivals by surprise."
Author: Doris Kearns Goodwin
9. "I think I was enchantedWhen first a sombre Girl —I read that Foreign Lady** —The Dark — felt beautiful —And whether it was noon at night —Or only Heaven — at Noon —For very Lunacy of LightI had not power to tell —The Bees — became as Butterflies —The Butterflies — as Swans —Approached — and spurned the narrow Grass —And just the meanest TunesThat Nature murmured to herselfTo keep herself in Cheer —I took for Giants — practisingTitanic Opera —The Days — to Mighty Metres stept —The Homeliest — adornedAs if unto a Jubilee'Twere suddenly confirmed —I could not have defined the change —Conversion of the MindLike Sanctifying in the Soul —Is witnessed — not explained —'Twas a Divine Insanity —The Danger to be SaneShould I again experience —'Tis Antidote to turn —To Tomes of solid Witchcraft —Magicians be asleep —But Magic — hath an ElementLike Deity — to keep —"
Author: Emily Dickinson
10. "Witchcraft was hung, in History,But History and IFind all the Witchcraft that we needAround us, every Day -"
Author: Emily Dickinson
11. "Out in the stone-pile the toad squatted with its glowing jewel-eyes and, maybe, its memories. I don't know if you'll admit a toad could have memories. But I don't know, either, if you'll admit there was once witchcraft in America. Witchcraft doesn't sound sensible when you think of Pittsburgh and subways and movie houses, but the dark lore didn't start in Pittsburgh or Salem either; it goes away back to dark olive groves in Greece and dim, ancient forests in Brittany and the stone dolmens of Wales. All I'm saying, you understand, is that the toad was there, under its rocks, and inside the shack Pete was stretching on his hard bed like a cat and composing himself to sleep.("Before I Wake...")"
Author: Henry Kuttner
12. "This was dangerous talk—in these enlightened times, a wise woman would never be too clever. The accusation of witchcraft had rid many men of an ugly wife and yet more women of an attractive rival."
Author: Joss Alexander
13. "Prose—it might be speculated—is discourse; poetry ellipsis. Prose is spoken aloud; poetry overheard. The one is presumably articulate and social, a shared language, the voice of "communication"; the other is private, allusive, teasing, sly, idiosyncratic as the spider's delicate web, a kind of witchcraft unfathomable to ordinary minds."
Author: Joyce Carol Oates
14. "A mage's soul is forged in the crucible of the magic"
Author: Margaret Weis
15. "The case for the humanities is not hard to make, though it can be difficult--to such an extent have we been marginalized, so long have we acceded to that marginalization--not to sound either defensive or naive. The humanities, done right, are the crucible within which our evolving notions of what it means to be fully human are put to the test; they teach us, incrementally, endlessly, not what to do but how to be. Their method is confrontational, their domain unlimited, their "product" not truth but the reasoned search for truth, their "success" something very much like Frost's momentary stay against confusion."
Author: Mark Slouka
16. "Of course, I'm not quite ready to forsake all the products of society, just yet. I have my clothes, my books, etc... But more and more I can see myself leaving much of the rest behind - leaving their makers, and the crucible from which they proceed. If at times, after all, I might benefit by the rays of the sun, must I seek also to reside in its nuclear core?"
Author: Mark X.
17. "When the Negro cries with pain from his deep hurt and lays his petition for elemental justice before the nation, he is calling upon the American people to kindle about that crucible of race relationships the fires of American faith."
Author: Mordecai Wyatt Johnson
18. "Most books on witchcraft will tell you that witches work naked. This is because most books on witchcraft were written by men."
Author: Neil Gaiman
19. "I can cite a few cases of where people have tampered around with magic and witchcraft that they've been very severely frightened and traumatised by some of the outcomes. I mean we are playing with fire, and I had to say that."
Author: Peter Hollingworth
20. "Does not… the ear of Handel predict the witchcraft of harmonic sound?"
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
21. "Well in those parts (upcountry India) they have were-tigers, or think they have, and I must say that in this case, so far as sworn and uncontested evidence went, they had every ground for thinking so. However, as we gave up witchcraft prosecutions about three hundred years ago, we don't like to have other people keeping on our discarded practices; it doesn't seem respectful to our mental and moral position."
Author: Saki
22. "...that witchcraft requires no potions, familiar spirits, or magic wands. Language upon a silver tongue affords enchantment enough."
Author: Salman Rushdie
23. "War, not peace, produces virtue. War, not peace, purges vice. War, and preparation for war, call forth all that is noble and honorable in a man. It unites him with his brothers and binds them in selfless love, eradicating in the crucible of necessity all which is base and ignoble. There in the holy mill of murder the meanest of men may seek and find that part of himself, concealed beneath the corrupt, which shines forth brilliant and virtuous, worthy of honor before the gods. Do not despise war, my young friend, nor delude yourself that mercy and compassion are virtues superior to andreia, to manly valor."
Author: Steven Pressfield
24. "I would wish this book could take the form of a plea for everlasting peace, a plea from one who knows... Or it would be fine to confirm the odd beliefs about war: it's horrible, but it's a crucible of men and events and, in the end, it makes more of a man out of you.But, still, none of these notions seems right. Men are killed, dead human beings are heavy and awkward to carry, things smell different in Vietnam, soldiers are afraid and often brave, drill sergeants are boors, some men think the war is proper and just and others don't and most don't care. Is that the stuff for a morality lesson, even for a theme?Do dreams offer lessons? Do nightmares have themes, do we awaken and analyze them and live our lives and advise others as a result? Can the foot soldier teach anything important about war, merely for having been there? I think not. He can tell war stories."
Author: Tim O'Brien
25. "Perhaps evil is the crucible of goodness... and perhaps even Satan - Satan, in spite of himself - somehow serves to work out the will of God."
Author: William Peter Blatty
26. "Fear no more the heat o' the sun,Nor the furious winter's rages;Thou thy worldly task hast done,Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;Golden lads and girls all must,As chimney-sweepers, come to dust.Fear no more the frown o' the great;Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:Care no more to clothe and eat;To thee the reed is as the oak:The sceptre, learning, physic, mustAll follow this, and come to dust.Fear no more the lightning-flash,Nor the all-dreaded thunder-stone;Fear not slander, censure rash;Thou hast finished joy and moan;All lovers young, all lovers mustConsign to thee, and come to dust. No exorciser harm thee! Nor no witchcraft charm thee! Ghost unlaid forbear thee! Nothing ill come near thee! Quiet consummation have; And renownéd be thy grave!"
Author: William Shakespeare

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Today's Quote

Now I often think of the first time I received artillery fire, and the subsequent obliteration of the enemy observation post. I'll never know how many men manned the OP, but in memory I fix the number at two, and though at the time I was angry that the pompus captain took the handset from me and stole m y kills, I have lately been thankful he insisted on calling the fire mission, ans sometimes when I am feeling hopeful or even religious, I think that buy taking my two kills the pompous captain handed me life, some extra moments of living for myself or that I can offer others, though I have no idea to use or disuse these extra moments, or if I've wasted them already."
Author: Anthony Swofford

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