Top Chants Quotes

Browse top 87 famous quotes and sayings about Chants by most favorite authors.

Favorite Chants Quotes

1. "In regards to the price of commodities, the rise of wages operates as simple interest does, the rise of profit operates like compound interest. Our merchants and masters complain much of the bad effects of high wages in raising the price and lessening the sale of goods. They say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits. They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. They complain only of those of other people."
Author: Adam Smith
2. "Apprendre n'est pas savoir; il y a les sachants et les savants : c'est la mémoire qui fait les uns, c'est la philosophie qui fait les autres. (p. 183)"
Author: Alexandre Dumas
3. "Il y a les sachants et les savants: c'est la mémoire qui fait les uns, c'est la philosophie qui fait les autres. La philosophie ne s'apprend pas; la philosophie est la réunion des sciences acquises au génie qui les applique."
Author: Alexandre Dumas
4. "O seasons, O castles,What soul is without flaws?All its lore is known to me,Felicity, it enchants us all."
Author: Arthur Rimbaud
5. "No killing," Jordan said. "We're trying to make you feel peaceful, so you don't go up in flames. Blood, killing, war, those are all non-peaceful things. Isn't there anything else you like? Rainforests? Chirping birds?""Weapons," said Jace. "I like weapons.""I'm starting to think we have a problematic issue of personal philosophy here."Jace leaned forward, his palms flat on the ground. "I'm a warrior," he said. "I was brought up as a warrior. I didn't have toys, I had weapons. I slept with a wooden sword until I was five. My first books were medieval demonologies with illuminated pages. The first songs I learned were chants to banish demons. I know what brings me peace, and it isn't sandy beaches or chirping birds in rainforests. I want a weapon in my hand and a strategy to win."Jordan looked at him levelly. "So you're saying that what brings you peace... is war.""Now you get it."
Author: Cassandra Clare
6. "The increasing importance of Sydney must in some measure be attributed to the flourishing condition of the colony itself, to the industry of its farmers, to the successful enterprise of its merchants, and to particular local causes."
Author: Charles Sturt
7. "Some false representations contravene the law; some do not. ... The sensibilities of no two men are the same. Some would refuse to sell property without carefully explaining all about its merits and defects, and putting themselves in the purchasers' place and inquiring if he himself would buy under the circumstances. But such men never would be prosperous merchants."
Author: Clarence Darrow
8. "Bearing witness from the sides of the room, ten or more lepers shouted at the bizarre scene, "Diable! Diable!" And then chants of some sort, or prayers, followed by more shouts of "Diable!" They were hurling these words at Moreau like stones."
Author: Cole Alpaugh
9. "To reach only for that which pleasantly enchants you is the least of imagination, if even imagination at all, by the obvious reality of remaining within your means. The greater of imagination is parallel to risk. It extends beyond your comfort zone or haven, or sense of beauty, or what you personally believe suits you in exploration of what may not."
Author: Criss Jami
10. "Employers who violate rules of fairness are punished by reduced productivity, and merchants who follow unfair pricing policies can expect to lose sales."
Author: Daniel Kahneman
11. "Nous aimons, sans nous en douter, tout ce qui nous livre à nos penchants, nous séduit et excuse notre faiblesse."
Author: Denis Diderot
12. "Peasants and princes, bailiffs and bakers' boys, merchants and mermaids, the figures were all immediately familiar. I had read these stories a hundred, a thousand, times before. They were stories everyone knew. But gradually, as I read, their familiarity fell away from them. They became strange. They became new. These characters were not the colored manikins I remembered from my childhood picture books, mechanically acting out the story one more time. They were people.... The stories were shot through with an unfamiliar mood. Everyone achieved their heart's desire...but only when it was too late did they realize the price they must pay for escaping their destiny. Every Happy Ever After was tainted."
Author: Diane Setterfield
13. "Having discovered, at the end of her efforts, the realm of non-will, she rejoices, for she knows now that her ruin conceals a pleasure principle, and she intends to profit by it. Abandonment enchants and fulfills her. Time continues to pass? She is not at all alarmed; let others bother about time; it is their business: they do not guess what relief there can be in wallowing in a present that leads nowhere …"
Author: Emil Cioran
14. "A sing-song of shouts filled the air as the merchants tried to attract buyers. Their voices had that end of the workday lift - a false brilliance composed of the hope that old dreams would be fulfilled, yet coloured by the knowledge that life would not change for them."
Author: Frank Herbert
15. "La nuit était merveilleuse – une de ces nuits comme notre jeunesse seule en connut. Un firmament si étoilé, si calme, qu'en le regardant on se demandait involontairement : Peut-il vraiment exister des méchants sous un si beau ciel ?"
Author: Fyodor Dostoyevsky
16. "If a man called Christmas Day a mere hypocritical excuse for drunkenness and gluttony, that would be false, but it would have a fact hidden in it somewhere. But when Bernard Shaw says the Christmas Day is only a conspiracy kept up by poulterers and wine merchants from strictly business motives, then he says something which is not so much false as startling and arrestingly foolish. He might as well say that the two sexes were invented by jewellers who wanted to sell wedding rings."
Author: G.K. Chesterton
17. "The males (of the Hutchinson family that included both religious dissenter Anne and immensely wealthy and politically connected Thomas) were merchants who sought salvation through commerce."
Author: H.W. Brands
18. "It was not Christianity which freed the slave: Christianity accepted slavery; Christian ministers defended it; Christian merchants trafficked in human flesh and blood, and drew their profits from the unspeakable horrors of the middle passage. Christian slaveholders treated their slaves as they did the cattle in their fields: they worked them, scourged them, mated them , parted them, and sold them at will. Abolition came with the decline in religious belief, and largely through the efforts of those who were denounced as heretics."
Author: Hypatia Bradlaugh Bonner
19. "Le seul fait de rêver est déjà très important,Je vous souhaite des rêves à n'en plus finir,Et l'envie furieuse d'en réaliser quelques- uns,Je vous souhaite d'aimer ce qu'il faut aimer,Je vous souhaite d'oublier ce qu'il faut oublier,Je vous souhaite des chants d'oiseaux au réveil,Je vous souhaite des rires d'enfants,Je vous souhaite des silences,Je vous souhaite de résister à l'enlisement,À l'indifférence, aux vertus négatives de notre époque.Je vous souhaite surtout d'être vous."
Author: Jacques Brel
20. "Only merchants have money to waste, and what are they but parasites who create nothing, grow nothing, make nothing but feed off another's labor?"
Author: James Clavell
21. "Could any State on Earth Immortall be,Venice by Her rare Goverment is She;Venice Great Neptunes Minion, still a Mayd,Though by the warrlikst Potentats assayed;Yet She retaines Her Virgin-waters pure,Nor any Forren mixtures can endure;Though, Syren-like on Shore and Sea, Her FaceEnchants all those whom once She doth embrace,Nor is ther any can Her bewty prizeBut he who hath beheld her with his Eyes:Those following Leaves display, if well observed,How she long Her Maydenhead preserved,How for sound prudence She still bore the Bell;Whence may be drawn this high-fetchd parallel,Venus and Venice are Great Queens in their degree,Venus is Queen of Love, Venice of Policie."
Author: James Howell
22. "In the past, poetry came in the form of spells and chants used to effect change."
Author: John Barton
23. "In a society so estranged from animals as ours, we often fail to credit them with any form of language. If we do, it comes under the heading of communication rather than speech. And yet, the great silence we have imposed on the rest of life contains innumerable forms of expression. Where does our own language come from but this unfathomed store that characterizes innumerable species? We are now more than halfway removed from what the unwritten word meant to our ancestors, who believed in the original, primal word behind all manifestations of the spirit. You sang because you were answered. The answers come from life around you. Prayers, chants, and songs were also responses to the elements, to the wind, the sun and stars, the Great Mystery behind them. Life on earth springs from a collateral magic that we rarely consult. We avoid the unknown as if we were afraid that contact would lower our sense of self-esteem."
Author: John Hay
24. "I wanted to do that again but, when I went to look for chants, I didn't want to do it in the exact same way."
Author: Jon Crosby
25. "« Et ces sauvages ? me demanda Conseil. N'en déplaise à monsieur, ils ne me semblent pas très méchants !-- Ce sont pourtant des anthropophages, mon garçon.-- On peut être anthropophage et brave homme, répondit Conseil, comme on peut être gourmand et honnête. L'un n'exclut pas l'autre.-- Bon ! Conseil, je t'accorde que ce sont d'honnêtes anthropophages, et qu'ils dévorent honnêtement leurs prisonniers. Cependant, comme je ne tiens pas à être dévoré, même honnêtement, je me tiendrai sur mes gardes... »"
Author: Jules Verne
26. "Lord Bacchus, can you hear me? Nod if you can hear me."Bacchus dropped his hands and nodded."You have never killed a Druid all by yourself, and you never will. Only with hordes of Bacchants and Roman legionnaires and the aid of Minerva have you ever managed to slay a single one of us. Your lackeys may get me eventually, and I know that I will never be able to slay you, but admit to yourself now that you, alone, will never prove my equal. The earth obeys me, son, not some petty god of grape and goblet." I switched to English for a postscript, "So suck on that, bitch."
Author: Kevin Hearne
27. "As a novelist, I have a somewhat higher soapbox to stand on than most people do when it comes to talking back to the merchants of fear."
Author: L. Neil Smith
28. "In England, coffeehouses were dubbed penny-universities, because for the admission price of one cent, a person could sit and be edified all day long by scholars, merchants, travelers, community leaders, gossips, and poets."
Author: Leah Hager Cohen
29. "Now the day is done,Now the shepherd sunDrives his white flocks from the sky;Now the flowers restOn their mother's breast,Hushed by her low lullaby.Now the glowworms glance,Now the fireflies dance,Under fern-boughs green and high;And the western breezeTo the forest treesChants a tuneful lullaby.Now 'mid shadows deepFalls blessed sleep,Like dew from the summer sky;And the whole earth dreams,In the moon's soft beams,While night breathes a lullaby.Now, birdlings, rest,In your wind-rocked nest,Unscared by the owl's shrill cry;For with folded wingsLittle Brier swings,And singeth your lullaby."
Author: Louisa May Alcott
30. "Si les gens sont si méchants, c'est peut-être seulement parce qu'ils souffrent, mais le temps est long qui sépare le moment où ils ont cessé de souffrir de celui où ils deviennent un peu meilleurs."
Author: Louis Ferdinand Céline
31. "You can't eat beauty, it doesn't feed you...beauty was not a thing that I could acquire or consume, it was something that I just had to be. You can't rely on how you look to sustain you. What actually sustains us, what is fundamentally beautiful, is compassion--for yourself and for those around you. That kind of beauty inflames the heart and enchants the soul."
Author: Lupita Nyong O
32. "He bared thick teeth. ‘I am Zacchariah. My price will be right. You show me now?'In that moment, ten generations of horse-traders counted for more than half a lifetime in the legions. I was my father made young again, itching to make a sale. Abandoning the Eagle – I was a horse-trader, what did I care for a gold bird on a stick, however venerated by the Hebrews? – I gathered Pantera and Horgias about me, and trekked back to the inn of the Cedar Tree.Along the way, we collected Zacchariah's well-muscled younger relatives, three other, unrelated, horse merchants who gazed at him with undisguised venom, a woman who claimed she could more accurately assess the sex of the foal our pregnant mare carried, a bone-setter who set to arguing with Horgias but gave up when his poor Greek met Horgias' worse Greek – and Nicodemus and his seven zealots who stood about as we conducted our business, obviously waiting for a chance to inflict violence upon us."
Author: M.C. Scott
33. "It was Stevenson, I think, who most notably that there are some places that simply demand a story should be told of them. ...After all, perhaps Stevenson had only half of the matter. It is true there are places which stir the mind to think that a story must be told about them. But there are also, I believe, places which have their story stored already, and want to tell this to us, through whatever powers they can; through our legends and lore, through our rumors, and our rites. By its whispering fields and its murmuring waters, by the wailing of its winds and the groaning of its stones, by what it chants in darkness and the songs it sings in light, each place must reach out to us, to tell us, tell us what it holds. ("The Axholme Toll")"
Author: Mark Valentine
34. "Novelists are stamina merchants, grinders, nine-to-fivers, and their career curves follow the usual arc of human endeavour."
Author: Martin Amis
35. "Their educations ended with high school - my father going to work as a clerk and then salesman in a company dealing in printing and stationary, and my mother working as a secretary and then bookkeeper in a firm of wool merchants."
Author: Martin Lewis Perl
36. "Ce qui m'effraie, ce n'est pas l'oppression des méchants; c'est l'indifférence des bons."
Author: Martin Luther King Jr.
37. "I'll always remember being called by my mother who beckoned me to look at the screen where a young man was being tortured by the church. Bag over his head, rolling on the ground, crying, suffocating, vomiting while the congression continues yelling chants, "God will save you!" treating him like the devil's child.It was the first time I've ever doubted God. First time I've ever heard the terms ‘Gays, and ‘Queers.' I went through a lot in my childhood, but this was the first I've ever been so traumatized. My mom tells me they deserved it and the church tries to justify their actions as if it was the most intelligent excuse in the world. At 12 years old, I knew only one thing. I would never be like them."
Author: Merlin
38. "National historical myths are a way of giving identity and more authenticity to a people. Exodus flattered the Jews half a millennium after it allegedly took place by making them feel like heroic refugees from slavery, and righteous conquerors of a land corrupted by paganism, wealth, and sex. The Illiad made the politicians, merchants, sailors, farmers, and schoolteachers of Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. into the heirs of austere, remorseless, honorable, courageous warriors, a race of demigods. Contrast this with the real Athenians of ca. 375 B.C. -- their bellies full of fishcakes, their throats bloated with cheap resined wine, their far-flung sharp commercial deals a laughable, reverse mirror-image of the noble warriors of the Trojan War era."
Author: Norman F. Cantor
39. "The ancient rishis discovered these laws of sound alliance between nature and man. Because nature is an objectification of Aum, the Primal Sound or Vibratory Word, man can obtain control over all natural manifestations through the use of certain mantras or chants."
Author: Paramahansa Yogananda
40. "I represent a rural state and live in a small town. Small merchants make up the majority of Vermont's small businesses and thread our state together. It is the mom-and-pop grocers, farm-supply stores, coffee shops, bookstores and barber shops where Vermonters connect, conduct business and check in on one another."
Author: Peter Welch
41. "Swipe fees have increased steadily since the introduction of debit cards 20 years ago, when there were no swipe fees at all. Merchants can't negotiate or control them. They've tried, but they have no leverage against the big banks and issuers. So they get ignored."
Author: Peter Welch
42. "The snow-banks melt, and the face of the earth becomes green before it, so shall the advancing spirit create its ornaments along its path, and carry with it the beauty it visits, and the song which enchants it; it shall draw beautiful faces, warm hearts, wise discourse, and heroic acts, around its way, until evil is no more seen. The kingdom of"
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
43. "A truly enlightened attitude to language should simply be to let six thousand or more flowers bloom. Subcultures should be allowed to thrive, not just because it is wrong to squash them, because they enrich the wider culture. Just as Black English has left its mark on standard English Culture, South Africans take pride in the marks of Afrikaans and African languages on their vocabulary and syntax. New Zealand's rugby team chants in Maori, dancing a traditional dance, before matches. French kids flirt with rebellion by using verlan, a slang that reverses words' sounds or syllables (so femmes becomes meuf). Argentines glory in lunfardo, an argot developed from the underworld a centyry ago that makes Argentine Spanish unique still today. The nonstandard greeting "Where y'at?" for "How are you?" is so common among certain whites in New Orleans that they bear their difference with pride, calling themselves Yats. And that's how it should be."
Author: Robert Lane Greene
44. "Je compare ton cœur à une ville où les justes et les méchants vivent pêle-mêle. Tu es le sultan de cette ville, et ton vizir est la raison."
Author: Saadi
45. "As I was a stranger in Olondria, I knew nothing of the splendour of its coasts, nor of Bain, the Harbour City, whose lights and colours spill into the ocean like a cataract of roses. I did not know the vastness of the spice markets of Bain, where the merchants are delirious with scents, I had never seen the morning mists adrift above the surface of the green Illoun, of which the poets sing; I had never seen a woman with gems in her hair, nor observed the copper glinting of the domes, nor stood upon the melancholy beaches of the south while the wind brought in the sadness from the sea. Deep within the Fayaleith, the Country of the Wines, the clarity of light can stop the heart: it is the light the local people call 'the breath of angels'..."
Author: Sofia Samatar
46. "Si tu veux nous nous aimeronsAvec tes lèvres sans le direCette rose ne l'interrompsQu'à verser un silence pireJamais de chants ne lancent promptsLe scintillement du sourireSi tu veux nous nous aimeronsAvec tes lèvres sans le direMuet muet entre les rondsSylphe dans la pourpre d'empireUn baiser flambant se déchireJusqu'aux pointe des aileronsSi tu veux nous nous aimerons."
Author: Stéphane Mallarmé
47. "What is magic?There is the wizard's explanation... wizards talk about candles, circles, planets, stars, bananas, chants, runes and the importance of having at least four good meals every day."
Author: Terry Pratchett
48. "The classic hustle is still famous, even today, for the cold purity of its execution: bring opium from India, introduce it into China00howdy Fong, this here's opium, opium, this is Fong—ah, so, me eatee!—no-ho-ho, Fong, you smokee, smokee, see? pretty soon Fong's coming back for more and more, so you create an inelastic demand for that shit, get China to make it illegal, then sucker China into a couple-three disastrous wars over the right of your merchants to sell opium, which by now you are describing as sacred. You win, China loses. Fantastic."
Author: Thomas Pynchon
49. "An artist is the magician put among men to gratify--capriciously--their urge for immortality. The temples are built and brought down around him, continuously and contiguously, from Troy to the fields of Flanders. If there is any meaning in any of it, it is in what survives as art, yes even in the celebration of tyrants, yes even in the celebration of nonentities. What now of the Trojan War if it had been passed over by the artist's touch? Dust. A forgotten expedition prompted by Greek merchants looking for new markets. A minor redistribution of broken pots. But it is we who stand enriched, by a tale of heroes, of a golden apple, a wooden horse, a face that launched a thousand ships--and above all, of Ulysses, the wanderer, the most human, the most complete of all heroes--husband, father, son, lover, farmer, soldier, pacifist, politician, inventor and adventurer..."
Author: Tom Stoppard
50. "Finally, in the midst of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday of November 1863 as Thanksgiving: a day to solemnly acknowledge the sacrifices made for the Union....Shopping was part of the American Dream, too. So in 1939, at the urging of merchants, FDR moved Thanksgiving ahead a week, to lengthen the Christmas shopping season. And there it has remained, a day of national gluttony, retail pageantry, TV football, and remembrance of the Pilgrims, a folk so austere that they regarded Christmas as a corrupt Papist holiday."
Author: Tony Horwitz

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Keep your head up. Keep your heart strong"
Author: Ben Howard

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