Top English Quotes

Browse top 1601 famous quotes and sayings about English by most favorite authors.

Favorite English Quotes

1. "In an English village, you turn over a stone and have no idea what will crawl out.Miss Marple"
Author: Agatha Christie
2. "If your computer speaks English, it was probably made in Japan."
Author: Alan Perlis
3. "Do you realise that people die of boredom in London suburbs? It's the second biggest cause of death amongs the English in general. Sheer boredom..."
Author: Alexander McCall Smith
4. "At a conference of sociologists in America in 1977, love was defined as "the cognitive-affective state characterized by intrusive and obsessive fantasizing concerning reciprocity of amorant feelings by the object of the amorance." That is jargon - the practice of never calling a spade a spade when you might instead call it a manual earth-restructuring implement - and it is one of the great curses of modern English."
Author: Bill Bryson
5. "Now, I know I'm going to break your hearts, but I am forced to leave you. You must call up all your fortitude, and try to bear it... "Bob swore!" - as the Englishman said for "Good night", when he first learnt French, and thought it so like English. "Bob swore," my ducks!" (Chapter XXII)"
Author: Charles Dickens
6. "I wasn't drunk," Alynwick grumbled. "I tchin' for a fight, aye, but no' drunk.""Careful," Black said with some amusement, "your cultured English accent is giving way to your heathen Highland one."
Author: Charlotte Featherstone
7. "We've been speaking English as a second language so long that we've forgotten it as our first."
Author: Chuck Palahniuk
8. "The English were infuriating. Everything was designed to put an outsider at a disadvantage. If you had to ask, you didn't belong."
Author: Daisy Goodwin
9. "I want to have the whole English experience. High tea, supervising manifestations, taking the waters, going to Harrods, discussing possible international conspiracies."
Author: Daniel O'Malley
10. "He belonged to a walled city of the fifteenth century, a city of narrow, cobbled streets, and thin spires, where the inhabitants wore pointed shoes and worsted hose. His face was arresting, sensitive, medieval in some strange inexplicable way, and I was reminded of a portrait seen in a gallery I had forgotten where, of a certain Gentleman Unknown. Could one but rob him of his English tweeds, and put him in black, with lace at his throat and wrists, he would stare down at us in our new world from a long distant past—a past where men walked cloaked at night, and stood in the shadow of old doorways, a past of narrow stairways and dim dungeons, a past of whispers in the dark, of shimmering rapier blades, of silent, exquisite courtesy."
Author: Daphne Du Maurier
11. "My freshman English professor at Kent State University in 1984 told me I was a good writer, and she loved all the silly pictures I drew in my notebook. She said I should try writing children's books, and so I did."
Author: Dav Pilkey
12. "A feature of English that makes it different compared with all other languages is its global spread."
Author: David Crystal
13. "Best of all, Galignani's, the English bookstore and reading room, a favorite gathering place, stood across the street from the hotel. There one could pass long, comfortable hours with a great array of English and even American newspapers. Parisians were as avid readers of newspapers as any people on earth. Some thirty-four daily papers were published in Paris, and many of these, too, were to be found spread across several large tables. The favorite English-language paper was Galignani's own Messenger, with morning and evening editions Monday through Friday. For the newly arrived Americans, after more than a month with no news of any kind, these and the American papers were pure gold. Of the several circulating libraries in Paris, only Galignani's carried books in English, and indispensable was Galignani's New Paris Guide in English. Few Americans went without this thick little leather-bound volume, fully 839 pages of invaluable insights and information, plus maps."
Author: David McCullough
14. "After my daughter was born, I'd considered buying a shotgun to ward off potential suitors fourteen or so years up the road. Now, as I listened to these girls babble and imagined Gabby one day talking with the same banality and ignorance of the English language, I thought of buying the same shotgun to blow my own fucking head off."
Author: Dennis Lehane
15. "Will non-English-speaking students start speaking English because their teachers were fired? Will children come to school ready to learn because their teachers were fired?It would be good if our nation's education leaders recognized that teachers are not solely responsible for student test scores. Other influences matter, including the students' effort, the family's encouragement, the effects of popular culture, and the influence of poverty. A blogger called "Mrs. Mimi" wrote the other day that we fire teachers because "we can't fire poverty." Since we can't fire poverty, we can't fire students, and we can't fire families, all that is left is to fire teachers."
Author: Diane Ravitch
16. "I came up with new leads for game stories by being observant and clever, by using the many gifts of the English language to intrigue and hook a reader."
Author: Dick Schaap
17. "Jamie let go of me. "Shut your mucky gob, man." He stepped close to our fearless leader in the dark, took hold of his jacket by the collar, and in a dead quiet voice that had gone dangerously Scots, threatened heatedly, "Talk like that again wi' these brave lassies listenin' an' Ah'll tear the filthy English tongue frae yer heid, so Ah will."
Author: Elizabeth Wein
18. "When I write a word in English, a simple one, such as, say, 'chief,' I have unwittingly ushered a querulous horde into the room. The Roman legionary is there, shaking his cap, or head, and Andy Capp is there, slouching in his signature working man's headgear."
Author: Geraldine Brooks
19. "Plus there was the standard French insult of ignoring your French and answering in English."
Author: Glen Duncan
20. "I think now, more than anytime I can remember, bands are sounding pretty similar whether they're English or American, from Manchester or London... or Leeds or Welsh or Irish."
Author: Graham Coxon
21. "Tea. He watched her while she made it, made it, of course, all wrong: the water not on the boil, the teapot unheated, too few leaves. She said, "I never quite understand why English people like teas so."
Author: Graham Greene
22. "I know all about you. You're the people waiting on the shoreline with the warm towels and the hot chocolate after the woman swims the English Channel."
Author: Gwen Moore
23. "The neglected pioneer of one revolution, the honoured victim of another, brave to the point of folly, and as humane as he was brave, no man in his generation preached republican virtue in better English, nor lived it with a finer disregard of self.{On American founding father and hero, Thomas Paine}"
Author: He
24. "Carlyle's genius was many-sided. He touched and ennobled the national life at all points. He lifted a whole generation of young men out of the stagnating atmosphere of materialism and dead orthodoxy into the region of the ideal. With the Master of Balliol, we believe that 'no English writer has done more to elevate and purify our ideas of life and to make us conscious that the things of the spirit are real, and that in the last resort there is no other reality."
Author: Hector Carsewell Macpherson
25. "I get some heat for what English people call 'overproduction.' I don't think my older stuff was overproduced, but I do think that sound has dated."
Author: Jackson Browne
26. "Maria looked at the TARDIS... 'Is that really your carriage?' She asked. 'It is not very good, monsieur. It has no wheels.''It doesn't need them,' laughed Amy. 'It's an English carriage. They don't have wheels.'Does Monsieur Rory push it?''When necessary,' laughed Amy."
Author: James Goss
27. "I am an American. I adore Britain and have a strong English half, but my roots are here in the U.S. - it is not a matter of choice; it is simply fact."
Author: Jennifer Ehle
28. "She liked things that had been written by people who had lived short, ugly, and tragic lives. Or, who at least, were English."
Author: Joe Hill
29. "Listeners will wonder what an Englishman is doing on the German radio tonight. You can imagine that before taking this step I hoped that someone better qualified than me would come forward."
Author: John Amery
30. "It was not the way Curve smelled that Colin liked - not exactly. It was the way the air smelled just as Lindsey began to jog away from him. The smell of perfume left behind. There's not a word for that in English, but Colin knew the French word: sillage. What Colin liked about Curve was not its smell on the skin but its sillage, the fruity sweet smell of its leaving."
Author: John Green
31. "Reading with an eye towards metaphor allows us to become the person we're reading about, while reading about them. That's why there is symbols in books and why your English teacher deserves your attention. Ultimately, it doesn't matter if the author intended the symbol to be there because the job of reading is not to understand the author's intent. The job of reading is to use stories as a way into seeing other people as a we ourselves."
Author: John Green
32. "I can scarcely manage to scribble a tolerable English letter. I know that I am not a scholar, but meantime I am aware that no man living knows better than I do the habits of our birds."
Author: John James Audubon
33. "Always when I write my music, I take my guitar, and I improvise always with a melody, you know, lyrics in Spanish. But sometimes I use some words in English. I don't know why. Maybe because I listen to a lot of music in English."
Author: Juanes
34. "English is a beautiful language, a remarkably precise language with a million words to choose from to deliver your exact shade of meaning."
Author: Laura Fraser
35. "Lots of English people say exactly the opposite of what they mean."
Author: Leon Krier
36. "So much of the literature we had to read for high school English class was filled with victimized, tragic, symbolic women who spurred the plot forward with their inevitable shunning/death/shunning-followed-by-pregnancy-followed-by-death timelines."
Author: Libba Bray
37. "I will find you another long-forgotten Queen Mab poem in no time. Depend on it. I refuse to let Cody or anyone else know more about English Literature than me. So calm yourself, Elfish, and let an expert take over."
Author: Martin Millar
38. "In English we must use adjectives to distinguish the different kinds of love for which the ancients had distinct names."
Author: Mortimer Adler
39. "I would love to spend more time in Britain one day. In my heart, I still feel that I'm English, and when I think of home, I think of England."
Author: Olivia Hussey
40. "After I'd been in college for a couple years I'd read Shakespeare and Frost and Chaucer and the poets of the Harlem Renaissance. I'd come to appreciate how gorgeous the English language could be. But most fantasy novels didn't seem to make the effort."
Author: Patrick Rothfuss
41. "Irish and English are so widely separated in their mode of expression that nothing like a literal rendering from one language to the other is possible."
Author: Robin Flower
42. "At the negotiations in Irvine, it became clear to me that there was no side I could stand on. The English despise me and my countrymen don't trust me. Wallace and the others are rebelling in the name of Balliol. I cannot fight with them. It would be as much a betrayal of my oath as when I was fighting for England. I know what I must do. What I should have done months ago.'Robert felt embarrassed, about to say the words. Inside, his father's voice berated him, but he silenced it. ‘I want you to weave my destiny,' he finished. ‘As you did for my grandfather.'When she spoke, her voice was low. ‘And what is your destiny?'He met her eyes now, all hesitation and embarrassment gone. ‘To be King of Scotland.'A smile appeared at the corners of her mouth. It wasn't a soft smile. It was hard and dangerous. ‘I will need something of yours,' she said, rising."
Author: Robyn Young
43. "There was, Katherine speculated, no possible way of concealing his Englishness, or any English person's Englishness for that matter. You could spot them immediately - pasty white; muffin bellied; Rorschached with quasi-Celtic tattoos."
Author: Sam Byers
44. "The lively oral storytelling scene in Scots and Gaelic spills over into the majority English-speaking culture, imbuing it with a strong sense of narrative drive that is essential to the modern novel, screenplay and even non-fiction."
Author: Sara Sheridan
45. "An English traveller relates how he lived upon intimate terms with a tiger; he had reared it and used to play with it, but always kept a loaded pistol on the table."
Author: Stendhal
46. "Stephen Burt is Professor of English at Harvard."Butterfly with Parachute"Stephen BurtA real one wouldn't need one,but the one Nathan draws surely does:four oblongs the size and color of popsicles,green apple, toasted coconut and grape,flanked, two per side, by billowing valentine hearts,in a frame of Scotch tape.Alive, it could stay off the floorfor a few unaerodynamic minutes;thrown as a paper airplane, for a few more.Very sensibly, therefore,our son gave it something, not to keep it apartfrom the ground forever, but rather to make safe its descent.When we ask that imagination discover the limitsof the realworld only slowly,maybe this is what we meant."
Author: Stephen Burt
47. "If you turned in a paper with writing on it, you were guaranteed a hook from Jake Epping of the LHS English Department, and if the writing was organized into actual paragraphs, you got at least a B-minus."
Author: Stephen King
48. "Or a White Englishman would rather smash a White Frenchman than a Jew! Crazy!"
Author: Tom Metzger
49. "As Brother Francis readily admitted, his mastery of pre-Deluge English was far from masterful yet. The way nouns could sometimes modify other nouns in that tongue had always been one of his weak points. In Latin, as in most simple dialects of the region, a construction like servus puer meant about the same thing as puer servus, and even in English slave boy meant boy slave. But there the similarity ended. He had finally learned that house cat did not mean cat house, and that a dative of purpose or possession, as in mihi amicus, was somehow conveyed by dog food or sentry box even without inflection. But what of a triple appositive like fallout survival shelter? Brother Francis shook his head. The Warning on Inner Hatch mentioned food, water, and air; and yet surely these were not necessities for the fiends of Hell. At times, the novice found pre-Deluge English more perplexing than either Intermediate Angelology or Saint Leslie's theological calculus."
Author: Walter M. Miller Jr.
50. "But Kate, dost thou understand thus much English? Canst thou love me?"Catherine: "I cannot tell."Henry: "Can any of your neighbours tell, Kate? I'll ask them."
Author: William Shakespeare

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