Top Pierre Quotes

Browse top 103 famous quotes and sayings about Pierre by most favorite authors.

Favorite Pierre Quotes

1. "Dans les épaisseurs de la nuit sèche et froide, des milliers d'étoiles se formaient sans trêve et leurs glaçons étincelants, aussitôt détachés, commençaient de glisser insensiblement vers l'horizon. Janine ne pouvait s'arracher à la contemplation de ces feux à la dérive. Elle tournait avec eux et le même cheminement immobile la réunissait peu à peu à son être le plus profond, où le froid et le désir maintenant se combattaient. Devant elle, les étoiles tombaient, une à une, puis s'éteignaient parmi les pierres du désert, et à chaque fois Janine s'ouvrait un peu plus à la nuit. Elle respirait, elle oubliait le froid, le poids des êtres, la vie démente ou figée, la longue angoisse de vivre et de mourir."
Author: Albert Camus
2. "The Frenchman sat up with that strange energy which comes often as the harbinger of death. "(...) This I tell you - I, Raoul de la Roche Pierre de Bras, dying upon the field of honour. And now kiss me, sweet friend, and lay me back, for the mists closes round me and I am gone!"With tender hands the squire [Nigel] lowered his comrade's head, but even as he did so there came a choking rush of blood, and the soul had passed. So died a gallant cavalier of France, and Nigel, as he knelt in the ditch beside him, prayed that his own end might be as noble and as debonair."
Author: Arthur Conan Doyle
3. "Waaant equity," hisses the alien intruder."You can't be Pamela Macx," says Pierre, his back to the wall, keeping the sword point before the lobster-woman-thing. "She's in a nunnery in Armenia or something. You pulled that out of Glashwiecz's memories - he worked for her, didn't he?"Claws go snicker-snack before his face. "Investment partnership!" screeches the harridan. "Seat on the board! Eat brains for breakfast!" It lurches sideways, trying to get past his guard."
Author: Charles Stross
4. "This just gets worse and worse," Rob Pierre sighed as he skimmed Leonard Boardman's synopsis of his latest gleanings from the Solarian League reporters covering the PRH. "How can one person—one person, Oscar!—do this much damage? She's like some damned elemental force of nature!""Harrington?" Oscar Saint-Just quirked an eyebrow and snorted harshly at Pierre's nodded confirmation."She's just happened to be in the right places—or the wrong ones, I suppose, from our perspective—for the last, oh, ten years or so. That's the official consensus from my analysts, at least. The other theory, which seems to have been gaining a broader following of late, is that she's in league with the Devil."
Author: David Weber
5. "Ici aussi, j'ai beaucoup attendu.""Attendu quoi ?""Une femme vive. L'incarnation étourdissante d'un mouvement perpétuel. Elle voulait parcourir le monde. Moi, j'étais déjà lourd. Je n'ai su ni la retenir ni la suivre. Je suis juste parvenu à lui faire deux enfants. J'aimais l'amener au Louvre. Un jour, nous étions ici, elle m'a dit... 'Reste là, si tu les aimes tant, ces femmes de pierre. Moi, je reviendrai te voir quand je serais vieille.'Alors voilà.J'attends."
Author: Étienne Davodeau
6. "...my longing was for Russia...Not Soviet Russia. But nineteenth-century Russia, the Russia of Dostoevsky's saintly prostitutes and Alyosha; of Tolstoy's Pierre; and Aksionov, the sufferer in "God Sees the Truth But Waits." A country where the characters in books were allowed to ask one another the questions: How must I live to be happy? What is goodness? Why does man suffer? What is to be done?"
Author: Guy Vanderhaeghe
7. "Nos cœurs ne sont pas de pierre. Les pierres peuvent s'effondrer et se briser, perdre leur forme. Mais le cœur ne peut pas s'effondrer. Le cœur n'a pas de forme mais il peut se propager à l'infini."
Author: Haruki Murakami
8. "In Paris the swaying lanterns are lit in the streets; lights shine through water, fuzzy, diffuse. Saint-Just sits by an insufficient fire, in a poor light. He is a Spartan after all, and Spartans don't need home comforts. He has begun his report, his list of accusations; if Robespierre saw it now, he would tear it up, but in a few days' time it will be the very thing he needs. Sometimes he stops, half-glances over his shoulder. He feels someone has come into the room behind him; but when he allows himself to look, there is nothing to see. It is my destiny, he feels, forming in the shadows of the room. It is the guardian angel I had, long ago when I was a child. It is Camille Desmoulins, looking over my shoulder, laughing at my grammar. He pauses for a moment. He thinks, there are no living ghosts. He takes hold of himself. Bends his head over his task. His pen scratches. His strange letterforms incise the paper. His handwriting is minute. He gets a lot of words to the page."
Author: Hilary Mantel
9. "Ask Robespierre. Ask the man with the conscience which is more important, your friend or your country— ask him how he weighs an individual in the scheme of things. Ask him which comes first, his old pals or his new principles. You ask him, Camille."
Author: Hilary Mantel
10. "As the year goes on, certain deputies—and others, high in public life—will appear unshaven, without coat or cravat; or they will jettison these marks of the polite man, when the temperature rises. They affect the style of men who begin their mornings with a splash under a backyard pump, and who stop off at their street-corner bar for a nip of spirits on their way to ten hours' manual labor. Citizen Robespierre, however, is a breathing rebuketo these men; he retains his buckled shoes, his striped coat of olive green. Can it be the same coat that he wore in the first year of the Revolution? He is not profligate with coats.While Citizen Danton tears off the starched linen that fretted his thick neck, Citizen Saint-Just's cravat grows ever higher, stiffer, more wonderful to behold. He affects a single earring, but he resembles less a corsair than a slightly deranged merchant banker."
Author: Hilary Mantel
11. "In the Convention tomorrow I shall put him up to confront Saint-Just. Imagine it. Our man the picture of starched rectitude, and looking as if he has just devoured a beefsteak; and Camille making a joke or two at our man's expense and then talking about '89. A cheap trick, but the galleries will cheer. This will make Saint-Just lose his temper-not easy, since he cultivates this Greek statue manner of his—but I guarantee that Camille can do it. As soon as our man begins to bawl and roar, Camille will fold up and look helpless. That will get Robespierre on his feet, and we will all generate one of these huge emotional scenes. I always win those."
Author: Hilary Mantel
12. "Talking to Robespierre, one tried to make the right noises; but what is right, these days? Address yourself to the militant, and you find a pacifist giving you a reproachful look. Address yourself to the idealist, and you'll find that you've fallen into the company of a cheerful, breezy professional politician. Address yourself to means, and you'll be told to think of ends: to ends, and you'll be told to think of means. Make an assumption, and you will find it overturned; offer yesterday's conviction, and today you'll find it shredded. What did Mirabeau complain of? He believes everything he says. Presumably there was some layer of Robespierre, some deep stratum, where all the contradictions were resolved."
Author: Hilary Mantel
13. "I resent you—" Robespierre said. His words were lost. "The People," he shouted, "are everywhere good, and if they obstruct the Revolution—even, for example, at Toulon—we must blame their leaders.""What are you going on about this for?" Danton asked him. Fabre launched himself from the wall. "He is trying to enunciate a doctrine," he shrieked. "He thinks the time has come for a bloody sermon." "If only," Robespierre yelled, "there were more vertu.""More what?""Vertu. Love of one's country. Self-sacrifice. Civic spirit.""One appreciates your sense of humor, of course." Danton jerked his thumb in the direction of the noise. "The only vertu those bastards understand is the kind I demonstrate every night to my wife."
Author: Hilary Mantel
14. "You must, of course. Robespierre doesn't lie or cheat or steal, doesn't get drunk, doesn't fornicate—overmuch. He's not a hedonist or a mainchancer or a breaker of promises." Danton grinned. "But what's the use of all this goodness? People don't try to emulate you. Instead they just pull the wool over your eyes."
Author: Hilary Mantel
15. "Inside his copy of The Social Contract he keeps a letter from a young Picard, an enthusiast called Antoine Saint-Just: "I know you, Robespierre, as I know God, by your works."When he suffers, as he does increasingly, from a distressing tightness of the chest and shortness of breath, and when his eyes seem too tired to focus on the printed page, the thought of the letter urges the weak flesh to more Works."
Author: Hilary Mantel
16. "Aurions-Nous échoué ? Au premier jour, Nous avons décidé de sceller la magie pour créer une nouvelle ère de paix pour les Hommes. Nos pouvoirs ont, depuis lors, été emprisonnés dans de vulgaires pierres disséminées dans tout Iriah. Mais l'un d'entre Nous clame que malgré toutes nos précautions, le procédé inverse reste possible. [...] Malheur à celui qui se retrouvera possédé par cette magie…"
Author: Iman Eyitayo
17. "Robespierre, however, was not the type of leader finally destined to emerge from the Revolution."
Author: Irving Babbitt
18. "In Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Canada has at last produced a political leader worthy of assassination."
Author: Irving Layton
19. "Il étouffe - le monde se couche sur lui - et l'étouffe - il est prisonnier - coincé par ses promesses …on lui demande des comptes …En face de lui …une machine à compter - une machine à écrire des lettres d'amour - une machine à souffrir - le saisit …s'accroche à lui …Pierre dis-moi la vérité"
Author: Jacques Prévert
20. "You go to school to get a job, and you get a job to take time off to do nothing. Why not do nothing to begin with?Pierre Anthon"
Author: Janne Teller
21. "The reason dying is so easy is because death has no meaning... And the reason death has no meaning is because life has no meaning. All the same, have fun!Pierre Anthon"
Author: Janne Teller
22. "J'ai commencé ma vie comme je la finirai sans doute : au milieu des livres. Dans le bureau de mon grand-père, il y en avait partout ; défense était de les faire épousseter sauf une fois l'an, avant la rentrée d'octobre. Je ne savais pas encore lire que, déjà, je les révérais, ces pierres levées : droites ou penchées, serrées comme des briques sur les rayons de la bibliothèque ou noblement espacées en allées de menhirs, je sentais que la prospérité de notre famille en dépendait..."
Author: Jean Paul Sartre
23. "To think, analyze and invent, he [Pierre Menard] also wrote me, "are not anomalous acts, but the normal respiration of the intelligence. To glorify the occasional fulfillment of this function, to treasure ancient thoughts of others, to remember with incredulous amazement that the doctor universal is thought, is to confess our languor or barbarism. Every man should be capable of all ideas, and I believe that in the future he will be." (Jorge Luis Borges, "Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote, 1939)"
Author: Jorge Luis Borges
24. "Mi empresa no es difícil, esencialmente. Me bastaría ser inmortal para llevarla a cabo." Pierre Menard, autor del Quijote"
Author: Jorge Luis Borges
25. "Desde su regreso a México, el pasado fluía hacia adelante y la vida fluía hacia atrás. Demasiadas cuentas pendientes. El cambio, del que tanto habló en París con Jean-Pierre, parecía una cripta mal cerrada."
Author: Juan Villoro
26. "Curioso que la gente crea que tender una cama es exactamente lo mismo que tender una cama, que dar la mano es siempre lo mismo que dar la mano, que abrir una lata de sardinas es abrir al infinito la misma lata de sardinas. "Pero si todo es excepcional", piensa Pierre."
Author: Julio Cortázar
27. "Mrs. Levesque will put me to use as witness, as crutch, as Kleenex, as proxy for Jean-Pierre -- a temporary substitute for all the neighbors, church folk, friends, and family members who will soon come bursting through her door to share her grief. I am a transitional love object, an objet d'amour; I am Rab-Rab, Blankie, Jesus, Mama. What a strange privilege it is to be so used."
Author: Kate Braestrup
28. "He left as silently as he'd come. Pierre LaManche favored crepe-soled shoes, kept his pockets empty so nothing jangled or swished. Like a croc in a river he arrived and departed unannounced by auditory cues. Some of the staff found it unnerving."
Author: Kathy Reichs
29. "They say: sufferings are misfortunes," said Pierre. 'But if at once this minute, I was asked, would I remain what I was before I was taken prisoner, or go through it all again, I should say, for God's sake let me rather be a prisoner and erat horseflesh again. We imagine that as soon as we are torn out of our habitual path all is over, but it is only the beginning of something new and good. As long as there is life, there is happiness. There is a great deal, a great deal before us."
Author: Leo Tolstoy
30. "Pierre was one of those people who are strong only when they feel themselves perfectly pure."
Author: Leo Tolstoy
31. "Pierre looked into the sky, into the depths of the retreating, twinkling stars. "And all this is mine, and all this is in me, and all this is me!" thought Pierre. "And all this they've caught and put in a shed and boarded it up!"
Author: Leo Tolstoy
32. "He got up, wishing to go around, but the aunt handed him the snuffbox right over Helene, behind her back. Helene moved forward so as to make room and, smiling, glanced around. As always at soirees, she was wearing a gown in the fashion of the time, quite open in front and back. Her bust, which had always looked like marble to Pierre, was now such a short distance from him that he could involuntarily make out with his nearsighted eyes the living loveliness of her shoulders and neck, and so close to his lips that he had only to lean forward a little to touch her. He sensed the warmth of her body, the smell of her perfume, and the creaking of her corset as she breathed. He saw not her marble beauty, which made one with her gown, he saw and sensed all the loveliness of her body, which was merely covered by clothes. And once he had seen it, he could not see otherwise, as we cannot return to a once-exposed deception."
Author: Leo Tolstoy
33. "But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness."
Author: Leo Tolstoy
34. "[Pierre] involuntarily started comparing these two men, so different and at the same time so similar, because of the love he had for both of them, and because both had lived and both had died."
Author: Leo Tolstoy
35. "This was his acknowledgment of the impossibility of changing a man's convictions by words, and his recognition of the possibility of everyone thinking, feeling, and seeing things each from his own point of view. This legitimate peculiarity of each individual which used to excite and irritate Pierre now became a basis of the sympathy he felt for, and the interest he took in, other people. The difference, and sometimes complete contradiction, between men's opinions and their lives, and between one man and another, pleased him and drew from him an amused and gentle smile."
Author: Leo Tolstoy
36. "Il se servait de son esprit comme d'un coin pour élargir de son mieux les interstices du mur qui de toute part nous confine. Les failles grandissaient, ou plutôt le mur, semblait-il, perdait de lui-même sa solidité sans pour autant cesser d'être opaque, comme s'il s'agissait d'une muraille de fumée au lieu d'une muraille de pierre.(L'abîme)"
Author: Marguerite Yourcenar
37. "To write entire pages of dazzling prose about a tomato -- for Pierre Arthens reviews food as if he were telling a story, and that alone is enough to make him a genius -- without ever seeing or holding the tomato is a troubling display of virtuosity."
Author: Muriel Barbery
38. "Pierre and Marie (then Maria Sklodowska, a penniless Polish immigrant living in a garret in Paris) had met at the Sorbonne and been drawn to each other because of a common interest in magnetism."
Author: Pierre
39. "The only one who is alive today and still being talked about is Pierre Cardin."
Author: Pierre Cardin
40. "For the admirable gift of himself, and for the magnificent service he renders humanity, what reward does our society offer the scientist? Have these servants of an idea the necessary means of work? Have they an assured existence, sheltered from care? The example of Pierre Curiee, and of others, shows that they have none of these things; and that more often, before they can secure possible working conditions, they have to exhaust their youth and their powers in daily anxieties. Our society, in which reigns an eager desire for riches and luxury, does not understand the value of science. It does not realize that science is a most precious part of its moral patrimony. Nor does it take sufficient cognizance of the fact that science is at the base of all the progress that lightens the burden of life and lessens its suffering. Neither public powers nor private generosity actually accord to science and to scientists the support and the subsidies indispensable to fully effective work."
Author: Pierre Curie
41. "I think both Georges St-Pierre and Anderson Silva are establishing legacies just by how long they've maintained their championship runs. I think both of them still have a lot left in their careers."
Author: Randy Couture
42. "You can't go by on hope. It doesn't pay the bills and it doesn't save lives. - Michael St. Pierre"
Author: Richard Doetsch
43. "Le véritable ami est celui qui ôte les pierres et les ronces devant nos pas."
Author: Saadi
44. "I'm afraid Pierre finds me lacking. (Gabrielle) If he's stupid enough to let me know, he'll find his face lacking a nose. (Carlos)"
Author: Sherrilyn Kenyon
45. "Nici nu ar fi numit iubire decat acel sentiment eroic ce se putea intalni in Franta lui Henric al III-lea si Bassompierre, sentiment care nu ceda in fata obstacolelor, ba, departe de asa ceva, dadea nastere unor lucruri marete."
Author: Stendhal
46. "Telle une pierre philosophale, l'authenticité semble ainsi avoir le pouvoir de transformer en or l'assemblage de toile et de pigments que constitue un tableau."
Author: Stéphanie Lequette De Kerbenoaël
47. "- T'as pas apporté des fleurs à Irina?-Offrir des fleurs aux femmes est une hérésie. Les fleurs sont des sexes obscènes, elles symbolisent l'éphémère et l'infidélité, elles s'écartèlent sur le bord des chemins, s'offrent à tous les vents, à la trompe des insectes, aux nuages de graines, aux dents des bêtes; on les foule, on les cueille, on y plonge le nez. A la femme qu'on aime il faudrait offrir des pierres, des fossiles, du gneiss, enfin une de ces choses qui durent éternellement et survivent à la flétrissure.C'est ce que j'aurai aimé répondre à Volodia mais mon russe est trop faible et je dis:-Si! mais elles ont fané en route. Le banya, Volodia, tu l'as préparé?"
Author: Sylvain Tesson
48. "Comme l'ennui. Nous étions devenus des êtres d'ennui, des paquets bourrés d'ennui.L'ennui sentait l'odeur des cimetières quand la pierre est humide. Il tournait autour de nous, rongeait nos paupières, striait la peau et s'enfonçait dans le ventre"
Author: Tahar Ben Jelloun
49. "It's not Adventureland, but you write some poems, the leaves move, and you get laid sometimes." Tom Drury's Pierre Hunter on life."
Author: Tom Drury
50. "Beyler," dedi, "gidip su kulübeyi ölçmenizi rica ediyorum. Tezgahin uzunlugunun 149 santimetre oldugunu göreceksiniz, yani Dünya ile Günes arasindaki uzakligin yüz milyarda biri. Kulübenin arka tarafinin yüksekligini, pencerelerin genisligine bölerseniz 176:56=3,14 çikar. Ön tarafin yüksekligi 19 desimetredir; bu da, Yunan aydönümü yillarinin sayisina esittir. Iki ön kösenin yüksekligi ile iki arka kösenin yüksekliginin toplami ise (190x2)+(176x2)=732'dir; bu da Poitiers zaferinin tarihidir. Tezgahin kalinligi 3,10 santimetre, pencerenin kornisinin genisligi ise 8,8 santimetredir. Tam sayilarin yerine onlara denk düsen alfebe harflerini (3 yerine C, 8 yerine H) koyarsak, C10H8'i elde ederiz. Bu da naftalinin formülüdür.""Olaganüstü!" dedim, "Bütün bu ölçümleri yaptiniz mi?""Hayir," dedi Aglié, "Jean-Pierre Adam diye biri, baska bir kulübe üstünde yapti. Sanirim piyango bileti satilan kulübelerin boyutlari az çok aynidir."
Author: Umberto Eco

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Golf is a spiritual game. It's like Zen. You have to let your mind take over."
Author: Amy Alcott

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