Top Vio Quotes

Browse top 3000 famous quotes and sayings about Vio by most favorite authors.

Favorite Vio Quotes

1. "It's obvious we can't all be a Gully Foyle, but most of us energize at such a low level, so far short of our real capabilities, we could all be more, do more."
Author: Alfred Bester
2. "He should've read the contract a little closer before he signed, but being moments from a painful and violent death had provided a necessary sense of urgency."
Author: Andrea Laurence
3. "I learned, too, how it was possible with the help of the picture and action to transform an apparently insignificant violin passage into an incident, and to lift a simple horn call into a thing of stupendous significance by means of scenic emphasis."
Author: Anton Seidl
4. "Obama's economic policies obviously have not worked, and have left the American market place with enormous uncertainty and anxiety."
Author: Bob Beauprez
5. "Okay, little car, you are protesting roads. They are death traps for animals. They are environmentally unsound impervious surfaces that cause runoff. I understand this. But could we protest in the summer?"
Author: Carrie Jones
6. "Any story you've heard of my behavior is probably true."
Author: David Caruso
7. "[...]not even dying a martyr's death is classified as extraordinary obedience when you are following a Savior who died on a cross."
Author: David Platt
8. "In Paris the cashiers sit rather than stand. They run your goods over a scanner, tally up the price, and then ask you for exact change. The story they give is that there aren't enough euros to go around. "The entire EU is short on coins."And I say, "Really?" because there are plenty of them in Germany. I'm never asked for exact change in Spain or Holland or Italy, so I think the real problem lies with the Parisian cashiers, who are, in a word, lazy. Here in Tokyo they're not just hard working but almost violently cheerful. Down at the Peacock, the change flows like tap water. The women behind the registers bow to you, and I don't mean that they lower their heads a little, the way you might if passing someone on the street. These cashiers press their hands together and bend from the waist. Then they say what sounds to me like "We, the people of this store, worship you as we might a god."
Author: David Sedaris
9. "We think of it as a sort of traffic accident of the heart. It is an emotion that scares us more than cruelty, more than violence, more than hatred. We allow ourselves to be foiled by the vagueness of the word. After all, love requires the utmost vulnerability. We equip someone with freshly sharpened knives; strip naked; then invite him to stand close. What could be scarier?"
Author: Diane Ackerman
10. "Life is like a film screen: pictures come, make an impression, go, and then make a place for new pictures with new impressions which obscure the previous ones. Some of those old pictures fade, but the impressions they leave will never pass away. Such an impression is the image of Hein Sietsma -- a joyful Christian who loved life so much but was still willing to give it to the great, good, and holy cause."
Author: Diet Eman
11. "Lo! ye believers in gods all goodness, and in man all ill, lo you! see the omniscient gods oblivious of suffering man; and man, though idiotic, and knowing not what he does, yet full of the sweet things of love and gratitude."
Author: Herman Melville
12. "Seeking nothing, emulating nothing, breathing gently, he moved in an atmosphere of imperishable calm, impresihable light, inviolable peace."
Author: Hermann Hesse
13. "Calling gender violence a women's issue is part of the problem. It gives a lot of men an excuse not to pay attention."
Author: Jackson Katz
14. "They turned to Angel. "We will call you Little One," the leader said, obviously deciding to dispense with the whole confusing name thing."Okay," said Angel agreeably. "I'll call you Guy in a White Lab Coat." He frowned."That can be his Indian name," I suggested."
Author: James Patterson
15. "Mrs. Norris had been talking to her the whole way from Northampton of her wonderful good fortune, and the extraordinary degree of gratitude and good behaviour which it ought to produce, and her consciousness of misery was therefore increased by the idea of its being a wicked thing for her not to be happy."
Author: Jane Austen
16. "'She's Country' obviously changed a lot of things for us and pretty much, I think, doubled our crowd size in just a few months time."
Author: Jason Aldean
17. "Tablets generally have made it pretty obvious that magazines have a new lease on life."
Author: Jeffrey Bewkes
18. "You smell of winter dew at the first crack of dawn and when you use your power it feels like being submerged in the most intoxicating vanilla cream that I lose myself in it every time and … and you were beautiful,? he blurted out, catching us both by surprise. But he went on, ignoring the fact that my hand was still slipping. „So stunning in that dress the other night I could hardly look at you it hurt so much. You are the thing I dread in myself, Violet, because … I love you so much that I can?t trust myself. I?d die for you, give up all my power for you, I?d give my soul in an instant, even if it meant I had to spend eternity in torment - just for one moment with you as mine. Wanting you consumes me. I dread you because I know the risk but I?m so selfish I want you anyway. I?d take you even though it could kill you"
Author: Jessica Shirvington
19. "England is a fairly envious little country and it's embodied in the press. They don't like anyone being more distinguished than they are."
Author: John Cleese
20. "No longer was she merely the dancing-girl who extorts a cry of lust and concupiscence from an old man by the lascivious contortions of her body; who breaks the will, masters the mind of a King by the spectacle of her quivering bosoms, heaving belly and tossing thighs; she was now revealed in a sense as the symbolic incarnation of world-old Vice, the goddess of immortal Hysteria, the Curse of Beauty supreme above all other beauties by the cataleptic spasm that stirs her flesh and steels her muscles, - a monstrous Beast of the Apocalypse, indifferent, irresponsible, insensible, poisoning."
Author: Joris Karl Huysmans
21. "I hope I will always have the chance to play the violin."
Author: Joshua Bell
22. "The written word, obviously, is very inward, and when we're reading, we're thinking. It's a sort of spiritual, meditative activity. When we're looking at visual objects, I think our eyes are obviously directed outward, so there's not as much reflective time. And it's the reflectiveness and the spiritual inwardness about reading that appeals to me."
Author: Joyce Carol Oates
23. "Violent resistance and nonviolent resistance share one very important thing in common: They are both a form of theater seeking an audience to their cause."
Author: Julia Bacha
24. "J.D. scoffed at this. "Please—as if I'm worried about anything Payton has to say. What's she going to do, give me another one of her little pissed-off hair flips?" He flung imaginary long hair off his shoulders, exaggerating. "I'll tell you, one of these days I'm going to grab her by that hair and . . ." He gestured as if throttling someone.Without breaking stride, he returned Tyler's serve. The two smashed a few back and forth, concentrating on the game when—Is violence always part of your sexual fantasies?" Tyler interjected.J.D. whipped around—Sexual—?"—and got hit smack in the face with the squash ball. He toppled back and sprawled ungracefully across the court.Tyler stepped over and twirled his racquet. "This is nice. We should talk like this more often."
Author: Julie James
25. "Le pareció que dulcemente una de las dos lloraba. Debía ser ella porque sintió mojadas las mejillas, y el pómulo mismo doliéndole como si tuviera allí un golpe. También el cuello, y de pronto los hombros, agobiados por fatigas incontables. Al abrir los ojos (tal vez gritaba ya) vio que se habían separado. Ahora sí gritó. De frío, porque la nieve le estaba entrando por los zapatos rotos, porque yéndose camino de la plaza iba Alina Reyes lindísima en su sastre gris, el pelo un poco suelto contra el viento, sin dar vuelta la cara y yéndose. (Lejana)"
Author: Julio Cortázar
26. "Whether the story reflects the facts is obviously a different matter."
Author: Kenneth Starr
27. "There is a point at which the law becomes immoral and unethical. That point is reached when it becomes a cloak for the cowardice that dares not stand up against blatant violations of justice."
Author: Kurt Huber
28. "A true Christian is made by faith and love toward Christ. Our sins do not in the least hinder our Christianity, according to the word of the Savior Himself. He deigned to say: not the righteous have I come to call, but sinners to salvation; there is more joy in heaven over one who repents than over ninety righteous ones. Likewise concerning the sinful woman who touched His feet, He deigned to say to the Pharisee Simon: to one who has love, a great debt is forgiven, but from one who has no love, even a small debt will be demanded. From these judgments a Christian should bring himself to hope and joy, and not in the least accept an inflicted despair. Here one needs the shield of faith."
Author: Letters Of St. Herman Of Alaska
29. "May we not succumb to thoughts of violence and revenge today, but rather to thoughts of mercy and compassion. We are to love our enemies that they might be returned to their right minds."
Author: Marianne Williamson
30. "The state calls its own violence law, but that of the individual crime."
Author: Max Stirner
31. "Codependents are reactionaries. They overreact. They under-react. But rarely do they act. They react to the problems, pains, lives, and behaviors of others. They react to their own problems, pains, and behaviors."
Author: Melody Beattie
32. "U prevelikom zanosu, zbog mrve savršenstva dogadalo se da pocinim obilje neoprostivih grešaka. Najveca od njih je bila sto sam se bavio znacima,umesto da pazim na predznak."
Author: Miroslav Antić
33. "You have responsibilities, now, Bob. You must lose this naive understanding of violence! You are embarrassin' me in front of the lads! You can't play by their rules or they'll win unfailingly! You don't engage in courtly play-fightin' with one such as this. You get a great friggin' tree-branch and keep hittin' him with it until he dies."
Author: Neal Stephenson
34. "Isis, I am envious of every male that sets his sight on you, and if I could, I would tear out their eyes."
Author: Nely Cab
35. "The next two who are called are also related. These are the brothers, James and John, James the just, the righteous judge, and his brother John, the beloved. Justice to be wise must be administered with love, ever turning the other cheek and at all times returning good for evil, love for hate, nonviolence for violence."
Author: Neville Goddard
36. "The older Puritans had trampled down all fleshly impulses; these newer Puritans trampled no less self-righteously upon the spiritual cravings. But in the increasingly spiritistic inclination of physics itself, Behaviorism and Fundamentalism had found a meeting place. Since the ultimate stuff of the physical universe was now said to be multitudinous and arbitrary "quanta" of the activity "spirits", how easy was it for the materialistic and the spiritistic to agree? At heart, indeed, they were never very far apart in mood, though opposed in doctrine. The real cleavage was between the truly spiritual view on the one hand, and the spiritistic and materialistic on the other. Thus the most materialistic of Christian sects and the most doctrinaire of scientific sects were not long in finding a formula to express their unity, their denial of all those finer capacities which had emerged to be the spirit of man."
Author: Olaf Stapledon
37. "For the various spiritual forms of the imagination have a natural affinity with certain sensuous forms of art - and to discern the qualities of each art, to intensify as well its limitations as its powers of expression, is one of the aims that culture sets before us. It is not an increased moral sense, an increased moral supervision that your literature needs. Indeed, one should never talk of a moral or an immoral poem - poems are either well written or badly written, that is all. And, indeed, any element of morals or implied reference to a standard of good or evil in art is often a sign of a certain incompleteness of vision, often a note of discord in the harmony of an imaginative creation; for all good work aims at a purely artistic effect. ‘We must be careful,' said Goethe, ‘not to be always looking for culture merely in what is obviously moral. Everything that is great promotes civilisation as soon as we are aware of it."
Author: Oscar Wilde
38. "Guy cradled his tux, stroking it, running his fingers incestuously over the satin stripe on the trousers. There is a satisfaction that only superb clothing can offer, the joy of man raising himself from the mud, vindicating evolution. Life cannot lack purpose if a tuxedo exists—this is the obvious reply to the Samuel Beckett canon."
Author: Paul Rudnick
39. "Vanity, right?" Nash reappeared in the living room with an open bag of potato chips. "I nominate my venerable brother. He likes to play hero, and one look at him should establish the vanity angle.""Nash!" I really shouldn't have been surprised by the dig. But I was."What?" He raised one brow at me in challenge. "It's okay to call me jealous, but not to call him vain?""Awareness of one's obvious advantages doesn't imply vanity," Tod insisted calmly.Nash turned on him. "Does it imply narcissism?"Tod huffed. "This coming from the guy who owns more hair products than his girlfriend."
Author: Rachel Vincent
40. "Philosophers are people who do violence, but have no army at their disposal, and so subjugate the world by locking it into a system."
Author: Robert Musil
41. "What are we after when we open one of those books? What is it that makes a classic a classic? ... in old-fashioned terms, the answer is that it wll elevate your spirit. And that's why I can't take much stock in the idea of going through a list of books or 'covering' a fixed number of selections, or anyway striving for the blessed state of having read this, or the other. Having read a book means nothing. Reading a book may be the most tremendous experience of your life; having read it is an item in your memory, part of your receding past... Why we have that odd faith in the magic of having read a book, I don't know. We don't apply the same principle elsewhere: We don't believe in having heard Mendelssohn's violin concerto...I say, don't read the classics -- try to discover your own classics; every life has its own."
Author: Rudolf Flesch
42. "Early impressions are hard to eradicate from the mind. When once wool has been dyed purple, who can restore it to its previous whiteness?"
Author: Saint Jérôme
43. "Both expectations and memories are more than mere images founded on previous experience."
Author: Samuel Alexander
44. "As I ponder on what Spirituality means, I am seeing that True Spirituality is a total and complete surrender to All that is and All that will be. All that We Are and All that We Will Be. It is a Total and Complete acceptance to All of Life and comes without judgment, without violence, but with Unconditional Love. Spirituality is Awakening to the true nature of the self without fear but with an Inner Peace stemming from Immense Love of Self and All other. When we discovery that our inner peace does not depend on events or circumstances in the world but on a quiet and profound inner fulfillment, we become less self-centered, less needy of others' approval or recognition, less focused on material things and social status and fame. We Become Much Happier, Healthier and More Loving Individuals who are less likely to cause suffering to ourselves and others." With My Love and Friendship Always!"
Author: Sean D. Hamilton
45. "Jerusalem was capital of southern Israel, known then as Judah. Isn't it true that there's always a rivalry between north and south? North and South Korea, North and South Vietnam, Northern and Southern Ireland, Yankees and Rebels, uptown and downtown. Somebody please tell me why that is? Maybe southerners get too much sun, like Mr. Sock over there, frying his threads, and northerners don't get enough (although I hardly think northern Israel a cool spot in the shade), but southern peoples--tropical and downtown types--always seem to lean toward decadence, whereas uptown, in the north, progress is favored. Decadence and progress obviously are at odds."
Author: Tom Robbins
46. "If nature leads us to mathematical forms of great simplicity and beauty—by forms, I am referring to coherent systems of hypotheses, axioms, etc.—to forms that no one has previously encountered, we cannot help thinking that they are "true," that they reveal a genuine feature of nature…. You must have felt this too: the almost frightening simplicity and wholeness of the relationships which nature suddenly spreads out before us and for which none of us was in the least prepared."
Author: Werner Heisenberg
47. "You have been speaking about William Carey. When I am gone, say nothing about William Carey-speak only about Willam Carey's Saviour."
Author: William Carey
48. "She carried her head high enough - even when we believed that she was fallen. It was as if she demanded more than ever the recognition of her dignity as the last Grierson; as if it had wanted that touch of earthiness to reaffirm her imperviousness"
Author: William Faulkner
49. "But, indeed, words are very rascals, since bonds [vows] disgraced them."Viola: "Thy reason, man?"Feste: "Troth [Truthfully], sir, I can yield you none without words, and words are grown so false, I am loathe to prove reason with them."
Author: William Shakespeare
50. "Where lies your text?Viola: In Orsino's bosom.Olivia: In his bosom! In what chapter of his bosom?Viola: To answer by the method, in the first of his heart."
Author: William Shakespeare

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Every writer seeking a present audience necessarily enters into a servile position under it. This is true not only of those who seek a large audience, the popular writers, who whether consciously or by disposition, expand their ideal reader to include all possible types, keeping their vocabulary and ideas small, augmenting their cheerfulness to aid digestion. It is true also of the avant-gardes who long for recognition, appealing to the critics and to their fellow ‘sensitives', creating a work quiet, infinitely subtle, a work under which the bohemians can band together and decry the demand for meaning, or which the professors, that pity-proletariat class, hail as a rallying point for ‘social justice'. In such cases, writers render up their skill and toil to scaring away the common reader with boredom and impotence. Artful writing is the most private of professions."
Author: Bauvard

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